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Melissa A. Koenig [4]Melissa Koenig [3]
  1. Paul L. Harris, Kathleen H. Corriveau, Elisabeth S. Pasquini, Melissa Koenig, Maria Fusaro & Fabrice Clément (2012). Credulity and the Development of Selective Trust in Early Childhood. In Michael Beran, Johannes Brandl, Josef Perner & Joëlle Proust (eds.), The Foundations of Metacognition. Oxford University Press. 193.
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  2. Melissa A. Koenig (2010). Selective Trust in Testimony: Children's Evaluation of the Message, the Speaker, and the Speech Act. In T. Szabo Gendler & J. Hawthorne (eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology. Oxford University Press. 3--253.
     
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  3. Paul L. Harris & Melissa A. Koenig (2007). The Basis of Epistemic Trust: Reliable Testimony or Reliable Sources? Episteme 4 (3):264-284.
    What is the nature of children's trust in testimony? Is it based primarily on evidential correlations between statements and facts, as stated by Hume, or does it derive from an interest in the trustworthiness of particular speakers? In this essay, we explore these questions in an effort to understand the developmental course and cognitive bases of children's extensive reliance on testimony. Recent work shows that, from an early age, children monitor the reliability of particular informants, differentiate between those who make (...)
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  4. Melissa A. Koenig & Paul L. Harris (2005). The Role of Social Cognition in Early Trust. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (10):457-459.
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  5. Fabrice Clément, Melissa Koenig & Paul Harris (2004). The Ontogenesis of Trust. Mind and Language 19 (4):360–379.
    Psychologists have emphasized children's acquisition of information through firsthand observation. However, many beliefs are acquired from others' testimony. In two experiments, most 4yearolds displayed sceptical trust in testimony. Having heard informants' accurate or inaccurate testimony, they anticipated that informants would continue to display such differential accuracy and they trusted the hitherto reliable informant. Yet they ignored the testimony of the reliable informant if it conflicted with what they themselves had seen. By contrast, threeyearolds were less selective in trusting a reliable (...)
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  6. Fabrice Clement, Melissa Koenig & Paul Harris (2004). The Ontogenesis of Trust. Mind and Language 19 (4):360-379.
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  7. Melissa A. Koenig & Catharine H. Echols (2003). Infants' Understanding of False Labeling Events: The Referential Roles of Words and the Speakers Who Use Them. Cognition 87 (3):179-208.
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