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  1. Melissa S. Baucus, William I. Norton, David A. Baucus & Sherrie E. Human (2008). Fostering Creativity and Innovation Without Encouraging Unethical Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):97 - 115.
    Many prescriptions offered in the literature for enhancing creativity and innovation in organizations raise ethical concerns, yet creativity researchers rarely discuss ethics. We identify four categories of behavior proffered as a means for fostering creativity that raise serious ethical issues: (1) breaking rules and standard operating procedures; (2) challenging authority and avoiding tradition; (3) creating conflict, competition and stress; and (4) taking risks. We discuss each category, briefly identifying research supporting these prescriptions for fostering creativity and then we delve (...)
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  2. Julie A. B. Cagle & Melissa S. Baucus (2006). Case Studies of Ethics Scandals: Effects on Ethical Perceptions of Finance Students. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 64 (3):213 - 229.
    Ethics instructors often use cases to help students understand ethics within a corporate context, but we need to know more about the impact a case-based pedagogy has on students’ ability to make ethical decisions. We used a pre- and post-test methodology to assess the effect of using cases to teach ethics in a finance course. We also wanted to determine whether recent corporate ethics scandals might have impacted students’ perceptions of the importance and prevalence of ethics in business, so we (...)
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  3. Melissa S. Baucus & Caryn L. Beck-Dudley (2005). Designing Ethical Organizations: Avoiding the Long-Term Negative Effects of Rewards and Punishments. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 56 (4):355 - 370.
    Ethics researchers advise managers of organizations to link rewards and punishments to ethical and unethical behavior, respectively. We build on prior research maintaining that organizations operate at Kohlbergs stages of moral reasoning, and explain how the over-reliance on rewards and punishments encourages employees to operate at Kohlbergs lowest stages of moral reasoning. We advocate designing organizations as ethical communities and relying on different assumptions about employees in order to foster ethical reasoning at higher levels. Characteristics associated with ethical communities are (...)
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  4. Terry Morehead Dworkin & Melissa S. Baucus (1998). Internal Vs. External Whistleblowers: A Comparison of Whistleblowering Processes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (12):1281 - 1298.
    We conduct quantitative and qualitative analysis of 33 cases of internal and external whistleblowers wrongfully fired for reporting wrongdoing. Our results show external whistleblowers have less tenure with the organization, greater evidence of wrongdoing, and they tend to be more effective in changing organizational practices. External whistleblowers also experience more extensive retaliation than internal whistleblowers, and patterns of retaliation by management against the whistleblower vary depending on whether the whistleblower reports internally or externally. We discuss implications for organizations and whistleblowers, (...)
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  5. TerryMorehead Dworkin & Melissa S. Baucus (1998). Internal Vs. External Whistleblowers: A Comparison of Whistleblowering Processes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (12):1281-1298.
    We conduct quantitative and qualitative analysis of 33 cases of internal and external whistleblowers wrongfully fired for reporting wrongdoing. Our results show external whistleblowers have less tenure with the organization, greater evidence of wrongdoing, and they tend to be more effective in changing organizational practices. External whistleblowers also experience more extensive retaliation than internal whistleblowers, and patterns of retaliation by management against the whistleblower vary depending on whether the whistleblower reports internally or externally. We discuss implications for organizations and whistleblowers, (...)
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  6. Melissa S. Baucus (1995). Commentary Halo-Adjusted Residuals-Prolonging the Life of a Terminally Ill Measure of Corporate Social Performance. Business and Society 34 (2):227-235.
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