Search results for 'Melody Isinger' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Melody Isinger (2002). The State of Graduate Education: One Student's View. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (4):1-2.score: 240.0
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  2. Psyche Loui (2012). Learning and Liking of Melody and Harmony: Further Studies in Artificial Grammar Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):554-567.score: 24.0
    Much of what we know and love about music is based on implicitly acquired mental representations of musical pitches and the relationships between them. While previous studies have shown that these mental representations of music can be acquired rapidly and can influence preference, it is still unclear which aspects of music influence learning and preference formation. This article reports two experiments that use an artificial musical system to examine two questions: (1) which aspects of music matter most for learning, and (...)
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  3. Jeremy Marozeau, Hamish Innes-Brown & Peter J. Blamey (2013). The Acoustic and Perceptual Cues Affecting Melody Segregation for Listeners with a Cochlear Implant. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Our ability to listen selectively to single sound sources in complex auditory environments is termed ‘auditory stream segregation.’ This ability is affected by peripheral disorders such as hearing loss, as well as plasticity in central processing such as occurs with musical training. Brain plasticity induced by musical training can enhance the ability to segregate sound, leading to improvements in a variety of auditory abilities. The melody segregation ability of 12 cochlear-implant recipients was tested using a new method to determine (...)
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  4. Rafael De Clercq (2007). Melody and Metaphorical Movement. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):156-168.score: 18.0
    In recent issues of this journal, Roger Scruton and Malcolm Budd have debated the question whether hearing a melody in a sequence of sounds necessarily involves an ‘unasserted thought’ about spatial movement. According to Scruton, the answer is ‘yes’; according to Budd, the answer is ‘no’. The conclusion of this paper is that, while Budd may have underestimated the viability of Scruton's thesis in one of its possible interpretations, there is no good reason to assume that the thesis is (...)
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  5. Kathleen Wermke & Werner Mende (2006). Melody as a Primordial Legacy From Early Roots of Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):300-300.score: 18.0
    The stormy development of vocal production during the first postnatal weeks is generally underestimated. Our longitudinal studies revealed an amazingly fast unfolding and combinatorial complexification of pre-speech melodies. We argue that relying on “melody” could provide for the immature brain a kind of filter to extract life-relevant information from the complex speech stream.
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  6. Carl Thomen (2011). Sublime Kinetic Melody: Kelly Slater and the Extreme Spectator. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (3):319-331.score: 18.0
    This paper aims to examine the awesome, almost spiritual feeling I experience as an ?extreme spectator? while watching Kelly Slater ride the monstrous waves of Pipeline. Drawing on the aesthetics of Kant and Schopenhauer, I examine the experience of the sublime and how it, in conjunction with the perceived kinetic melody of Slater's movements and his karmic connection to the environment in which he thrives, gives rise to the deeply felt awe of the extreme spectator. My intention is to (...)
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  7. Charles H. Cosgrove & Mary C. Meyer (2006). Melody and Word Accent Relationships in Ancient Greek Musical Documents: The Pitch Height Rule. Journal of Hellenic Studies 126:66-81.score: 18.0
    It has long been known from the extant ancient Greek musical documents that some composers correlated melodic contour with word accents. Up to now, the evidence of this compositional technique has been judged impressionistically. In this article a statistical method of interpretation through computer simulation is set forth and applied to the musical texts, focusing on the convention of correlating a word¿s accent with the highest pitch level in the melody for that word: the Pitch Height Rule. The results (...)
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  8. Susan A. J. Stuart (2010). Conscious Machines: Memory, Melody and Muscular Imagination. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):37-51.score: 16.0
    A great deal of effort has been, and continues to be, devoted to developing consciousness artificially (A small selection of the many authors writing in this area includes: Cotterill (J Conscious Stud 2:290–311, 1995 , 1998 ), Haikonen ( 2003 ), Aleksander and Dunmall (J Conscious Stud 10:7–18, 2003 ), Sloman ( 2004 , 2005 ), Aleksander ( 2005 ), Holland and Knight ( 2006 ), and Chella and Manzotti ( 2007 )), and yet a similar amount of effort has (...)
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  9. Leon Y. Deouell, Diana Deutsch, Donatella Scabini, Nachum Soroker & Robert T. Knight (2007). No Disillusions in Auditory Extinction: Perceiving a Melody Comprised of Unperceived Notes. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 16.0
    The formation of coherent percepts requires grouping together spatio-temporally disparate sensory inputs. Two major questions arise: (1) is awareness necessary for this process; and (2) can non-conscious elements of the sensory input be grouped into a conscious perceptµ To address this question, we tested two patients suffering from severe left auditory extinction following right hemisphere damage. In extinction, patients are unaware of the presence of left side stimuli when they are presented simultaneously with right side stimuli. We used the ‘scale (...)
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  10. Gerald J. Postema (2004). Melody and Law's Mindfulness of Time. Ratio Juris 17 (2):203-226.score: 15.0
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  11. Andrew Barker (2005). The Journeying Voice: Melody and Metaphysics in Aristoxenian Science. Apeiron 38 (3):161 - 184.score: 15.0
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  12. Régine Kolinsky, Pascale Lidji, Isabelle Peretz, Mireille Besson & José Morais (2009). Processing Interactions Between Phonology and Melody: Vowels Sing but Consonants Speak. Cognition 112 (1):1-20.score: 15.0
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  13. Richard L. Moreland & Sascha Topolinski (2010). The Mere Exposure Phenomenon: A Lingering Melody by Robert Zajonc. Emotion Review 2 (4):329-339.score: 15.0
    The mere exposure phenomenon (repeated exposure to a stimulus is sufficient to improve attitudes toward that stimulus) is one of the most inspiring phenomena associated with Robert Zajonc’s long and productive career in social psychology. In the first part of this article, Richard Moreland (who was trained by Zajonc in graduate school) describes his own work on exposure and learning, and on the relationships among familiarity, similarity, and attraction in person perception. In the second part, Sascha Topolinski (a recent graduate (...)
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  14. Daniel Bowling Bowling (2013). A Vocal Basis for the Affective Character of Musical Mode in Melody. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 15.0
    Why does major music sound happy and minor music sound sad? The idea that different musical modes are best suited to the expression of different emotions has been prescribed by composers, music theorists, and natural philosophers for millennia. However, the reason we associate musical modes with emotions remains a matter of debate. On one side there is considerable evidence that mode-emotion associations arise through exposure to the conventions of a particular musical culture, suggesting a basis in lifetime learning. On the (...)
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  15. Oswald Hanfling (1990). 'I Heard a Plaintive Melody': ( Philosophical Investigations, P. 209). Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 28:117-133.score: 15.0
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  16. Suominen Kalervo (2011). Brain Responses to Out-of-Key Modification in Familiar Melody in Musician and Non-Musician Children. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 15.0
  17. Nobuaki Minematsu & Tazuko Nishimura (2008). Consideration of Infants' Vocal Imitation Through Modeling Speech as Timbre-Based Melody. In. In Satoh (ed.), New Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence. Springer. 26--39.score: 15.0
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  18. Judy Plantinga & Laurel J. Trainor (2005). Memory for Melody: Infants Use a Relative Pitch Code. Cognition 98 (1):1-11.score: 15.0
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  19. Crinuţa Popescu (2011). Knowledge in Music Theory by Logical Constants of Melody. Analysis and Metaphysics 10:144-149.score: 15.0
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  20. Bruno H. Repp (2007). Hearing a Melody in Different Ways: Multistability of Metrical Interpretation, Reflected in Rate Limits of Sensorimotor Synchronization. Cognition 102 (3):434-454.score: 15.0
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  21. E. Schellenberg (1996). Expectancy in Melody: Tests of the Implication-Realization Model. Cognition 58 (1):75-125.score: 15.0
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  22. David Temperley (2008). A Probabilistic Model of Melody Perception. Cognitive Science 32 (2):418-444.score: 15.0
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  23. Mireille Besson, Cyrille Magne & Daniele Schön (2002). Emotional Prosody: Sex Differences in Sensitivity to Speech Melody. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (10):405-407.score: 15.0
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  24. James J. Crile (2012). A Silent Melody. Newman Studies Journal 9 (2):79-90.score: 15.0
    Although Newman’s Fifteenth Oxford University Sermon is often considered a precursor to An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine (1845), the following essay views this Sermon as an expression of Newman’s personal struggle from 1839 to 1845: in the midst of confusion, he pondered; against the threat of liberal skepticism, he defended truth; in the face of doubt, he reaffirmed his relationship with God.
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  25. I. Guaitella (1995). Is the Melody of Gesture a Vocal Mimic. Semiotica 103 (3-4):253-276.score: 15.0
     
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  26. John P. McCarthy (1995). The Great Melody: A Thematic Biography and Commented Anthology of Edmund Burke, by Conor Cruise O'Brien. The Chesterton Review 21 (1/2):139-147.score: 15.0
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  27. Iain Morley (2011). A Grand Gesture: Vocal and Corporeal Control in Melody, Rhythm, and Emotion. In Patrick Rebuschat, Martin Rohrmeier, John A. Hawkins & Ian Cross (eds.), Language and Music as Cognitive Systems. Oup Oxford. 110.score: 15.0
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  28. Letitia R. Naigles & Judit Druks (1996). E. Glenn Schellenberg (University of Windsor) Expectancy in Melody: Tests of the Implication-Realization Model, 75-125. Cognition 58:377-378.score: 15.0
     
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  29. Conor Cruise O'Brien (forthcoming). The Great Melody (London. Minerva.score: 15.0
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  30. King Rohan, Kirk Ian & King Chris (2013). Melody and Gamma Oscillations: Processing of Contour and Interval in Musicians and Non-Musicians. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 15.0
  31. M. Serafine (1984). Integration of Melody and Text in Memory for Songs. Cognition 16 (3):285-303.score: 15.0
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  32. Ted Toadvine (2005). The Melody of Life and the Motif of Philosophy. Chiasmi International 7:263-278.score: 15.0
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  33. J. Merrill, D. Sammler, M. Bangert, D. Goldhahn, G. Lohmann, R. Turner & A. D. Friederici (2011). Perception of Words and Pitch Patterns in Song and Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 3:76-76.score: 9.0
    This fMRI study examines shared and distinct cortical areas involved in the auditory perception of song and speech at the level of their underlying constituents: words, pitch and rhythm. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on the brain activity patterns of six conditions, arranged in a subtractive hierarchy: sung sentences including words, pitch and rhythm; hummed speech prosody and song melody containing only pitch patterns and rhythm; as well as the pure musical or speech rhythm. Systematic contrasts between these (...)
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  34. J. P. Guilford & H. M. Nelson (1936). Changes in the Pitch of Tones When Melodies Are Repeated. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (2):193.score: 7.0
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  35. J. P. Guilford & R. A. Hilton (1933). Some Configurational Properties of Short Musical Melodies. Journal of Experimental Psychology 16 (1):32.score: 7.0
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  36. J. P. Guilford & Helen M. Nelson (1937). The Pitch of Tones in Melodies as Compared with Single Tones. Journal of Experimental Psychology 20 (4):309.score: 7.0
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  37. Roger T. Dean Freya Bailes, Laura Bishop, Catherine J. Stevens (2012). Mental Imagery for Musical Changes in Loudness. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 7.0
    Musicians imagine music during mental rehearsal, when reading from a score, and while composing. An important characteristic of music is its temporality. Among the parameters that vary through time is sound intensity, perceived as patterns of loudness. Studies of mental imagery for melodies (i.e. pitch and rhythm) show interference from concurrent musical pitch and verbal tasks, but how we represent musical changes in loudness is unclear. Theories suggest that our perceptions of loudness change relate to our perceptions of force or (...)
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  38. Marcus T. Pearce & Geraint A. Wiggins (2012). Auditory Expectation: The Information Dynamics of Music Perception and Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):625-652.score: 6.0
    Following in a psychological and musicological tradition beginning with Leonard Meyer, and continuing through David Huron, we present a functional, cognitive account of the phenomenon of expectation in music, grounded in computational, probabilistic modeling. We summarize a range of evidence for this approach, from psychology, neuroscience, musicology, linguistics, and creativity studies, and argue that simulating expectation is an important part of understanding a broad range of human faculties, in music and beyond.
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  39. Jamila Andoh & Robert J. Zatorre (2011). Interhemispheric Connectivity Influences the Degree of Modulation of TMS-Induced Effects During Auditory Processing. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 6.0
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  40. André Charrak (2001). Rousseau et la musique : passivité et activité dans l'agrément. Archives de Philosophie 2:325-342.score: 6.0
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  41. R. P. Carroll (1931). Practice in Rating. Journal of Experimental Psychology 14 (3):299.score: 6.0
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  42. Raghunath Ghosh (1994). Sura, Man, and Society: Philosophy of Harmony in Indian Tradition. Academic Enterprise.score: 6.0
     
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  43. Ubirajara Rancan de Azevedo Marques (2011). Kant e as analogias musicais. Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 36 (2):25-42.score: 6.0
    Ademais do glossário filosófico, Kant emprega muitos outros repertórios linguísticos; dentre eles, por exemplo, o musical. O presente estudo, considerando o léxico musical kantiano, não tem como objetivo a promoção estética da música no cenário da filosofia crítica, mas o reconhecimento e a análise preliminar de um recurso argumentativo utilizado pelo filósofo, a saber, a analogia musical.
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  44. Stephen Davies (2010). Perceiving Melodies and Perceiving Musical Colors. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):19-39.score: 5.0
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  45. Eleonora Rocconi (2003). Greek Musical Texts E. Pöhlmann, M. L. West (Edd.): Documents of Ancient Greek Music. The Extant Melodies and Fragments Edited and Transcribed with Commentary . Pp. 222, Ills, Pls. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2001. Cased, £40. Isbn: 0-19-815223-X. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (01):69-.score: 5.0
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  46. A. MacC Armstrong (1979). On Melodiousness. British Journal of Aesthetics 19 (2):112-119.score: 5.0
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  47. Steven Runciman (1964). The Kontakia of Romanus Paul Maas and C. A. Trypanis: Sancti Romani Melodi Cantica: Cantica Genuina. Pp. Xxxvi+548. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1963. Cloth, £6. 6s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 14 (02):144-145.score: 5.0
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  48. Jean Mary Zarate Robert J. Zatorre, Karine Delhommeau (2012). Modulation of Auditory Cortex Response to Pitch Variation Following Training with Microtonal Melodies. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 5.0
    We tested changes in cortical functional response to auditory configural learning by training ten human listeners to discriminate micromelodies (consisting of smaller pitch intervals than normally used in Western music). We measured covariation in blood oxygenation signal to increasing pitch-interval size in order to dissociate global changes in activity from those specifically associated with the stimulus feature of interest. A psychophysical staircase procedure with feedback was used for training over a two-week period. Behavioral tests of discrimination ability performed before and (...)
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  49. D. M. Nicol (1972). Paul Maas and G. A. Trypanis: Sancti Romani Melodi Cantica: Cantica Dubia. Pp. Xx and 224. Berlin: De Gruyter, 1970. Cloth, DM. 64. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 22 (02):269-270.score: 5.0
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  50. Ted Toadvine (2005). Résumé: La mélodie de la vie et Ie motif de la philosophie. Chiasmi International 7:279-279.score: 5.0
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