30 found
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  1. A. David Milner & Melvyn A. Goodale (1995). The Visual Brain in Action. Oxford University Press.
    Although the mechanics of how the eye works are well understood, debate still exists as to how the complex machinery of the brain interprets neural impulses...
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  2.  57
    Melvyn A. Goodale & A. David Milner (2004/2005). Sight Unseen: An Exploration of Conscious and Unconscious Vision. Oxford University Press.
    Vision, more than any other sense, dominates our mental life. Our visual experience is just so rich, so detailed, that we can hardly distinguish that experience from the world itself. Even when we just think about the world and don't look at it directly, we can't help but 'imagine' what it looks like. We think of 'seeing' as being a conscious activity--we direct our eyes, we choose what we look at, we register what we are seeing. The series of events (...)
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  3.  97
    Melvyn A. Goodale & A. David Milner (1992). Separate Visual Pathways for Perception and Action. Trends in Neurosciences 15:20-25.
  4.  8
    Robert T. Foley, Robert L. Whitwell & Melvyn A. Goodale (2015). The Two-Visual-Systems Hypothesis and the Perspectival Features of Visual Experience. Consciousness and Cognition 35:225-233.
  5.  5
    A. David Milner & Melvyn A. Goodale (2010). Cortical Visual Systems for Perception and Action. In N. Gangopadhay, M. Madary & F. Spicer (eds.), Perception, Action, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press 71--94.
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  6.  19
    David M. Eagleman & Melvyn A. Goodale (2009). Why Color Synesthesia Involves More Than Color. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (7):288-292.
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  7.  7
    Melvyn A. Goodale (2007). Duplex Vision: Separate Cortical Pathways for Conscious Perception and the Control of Action. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell 616--627.
  8.  10
    Craig S. Chapman, Jason P. Gallivan, Daniel K. Wood, Jennifer L. Milne, Jody C. Culham & Melvyn A. Goodale (2010). Reaching for the Unknown: Multiple Target Encoding and Real-Time Decision-Making in a Rapid Reach Task. Cognition 116 (2):168-176.
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  9.  71
    James Danckert & Melvyn A. Goodale (2000). Blindsight: A Conscious Route to Unconscious Vision. Current Biology 10 (1):31-43.
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  10.  16
    G. K. Humphrey & Melvyn A. Goodale (1998). Probing Unconscious Visual Processing with the Mccollough Effect. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):494-519.
    The McCollough effect, an orientation-contingent color aftereffect, has been known for over 30 years and, like other aftereffects, has been taken as a means of probing the brain's operations psychophysically. In this paper, we review psychophysical, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging studies of the McCollough effect. Much of the evidence suggests that the McCollough effect depends on neural mechanisms that are located early in the cortical visual pathways, probably in V1. We also review evidence showing that the aftereffect can be induced without (...)
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  11.  17
    Melvyn A. Goodale & A. David Milner (2004). Plans for Action. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):37-40.
    It is our contention that the concept of planning in Glover's model is too broadly defined, encompassing both action/goal selection and the programming of the constituent movements required to acquire the goal. We argue that this monolithic view of planning is untenable on neuropsychological, neurophysiological, and behavioural grounds. The evidence demands instead that a distinction be made between action planning and the specification of the initial kinematic parameters, with the former depending on processing in the ventral stream and the latter (...)
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  12. Melvyn A. Goodale, Jonathan S. Cant & Grzegorz Króliczak (2006). Grasping the Past and Present: When Does Visuomotor Priming Occur? In Ögmen, Haluk; Breitmeyer, Bruno G. (2006). The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. (Pp. 51-71). Cambridge, Ma, Us: Mit Press. Xi, 410 Pp.
  13.  15
    Melvyn A. Goodale (2001). Real Action in a Virtual World. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):984-985.
    O'Regan & Noë run into some difficulty in trying to reconcile their “seeing as acting” proposal with the perception and action account of the functions of the two streams of visual projections in the primate cerebral cortex. I suggest that part of the problem is their reluctance to acknowledge that the mechanisms in the ventral stream may play a more critical role in visual awareness and qualia than mechanisms in the dorsal stream.
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  14. David Milner & Melvyn A. Goodale (1998). The Visual Brain in Action (Precis). Psyche 4 (12).
    First published in 1995, The Visual Brain in Action remains a seminal publication in the cognitive sciences. It presents a model for understanding the visual processing underlying perception and action, proposing a broad distinction within the brain between two kinds of vision: conscious perception and unconscious 'online' vision. It argues that each kind of vision can occur quasi-independently of the other, and is separately handled by a quite different processing system. In the 11 years since publication, the book has provoked (...)
     
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  15. Melvyn A. Goodale (2004). Perceiving the World and Grasping It: Dissociations Between Conscious and Unconscious Visual Processing. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press 1159-1172.
     
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  16.  11
    A. David Milner, Tzvi Ganel & Melvyn A. Goodale (2012). Does Grasping in Patient DF Depend on Vision? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (5):256-257.
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  17.  21
    David A. Westwood & Melvyn A. Goodale (2001). Perception and Action Planning: Getting It Together. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):907-908.
    Hommel et al. propose that high-level perception and action planning share a common representational domain, which facilitates the control of intentional actions. On the surface, this point of view appears quite different from an alternative account that suggests that “action” and “perception” are functionally and neurologically dissociable processes. But it is difficult to reconcile these apparently different perspectives, because Hommel et al. do not clearly specify what they mean by “perception” and “action planning.” With respect to the visual control of (...)
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  18.  4
    Rixin Tang, Robert L. Whitwell & Melvyn A. Goodale (2015). The Influence of Visual Feedback From the Recent Past on the Programming of Grip Aperture is Grasp-Specific, Shared Between Hands, and Mediated by Sensorimotor Memory Not Task Set. Cognition 138:49-63.
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  19.  3
    Melvyn A. Goodale & Philip Servos (1992). Now You See It, Now You Don't: How Delaying an Action System Can Transform a Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):335-336.
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  20.  7
    Gavin Buckingham & Melvyn A. Goodale (2013). When the Predictive Brain Gets It Really Wrong. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):208-209.
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  21.  21
    Melvyn A. Goodale & Jonathan S. Cant (2007). Coming to Grips with Vision and Touch. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):209-210.
    Dijkerman & de Haan (D&dH) propose a convincing model of somatosensory organization that is inspired by earlier perception-action models of the visual system. In this commentary, we suggest that the dorsal and ventral visual streams both contribute to the control of action, but in different ways. Using the example of grip and load force calibration, we show how the ventral stream can invoke stored information about the material properties of objects originally derived from the somatosensory system.
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  22.  4
    Melvyn A. Goodale & Lorna S. Jakobson (1992). Action Systems in the Posterior Parietal Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):747-747.
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  23.  7
    Melvyn A. Goodale (2001). Why Vision is More Than Seeing. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (Supplement):187-214.
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  24.  2
    Melvyn A. Goodale & Kelly J. Murphy (2000). Pulv i s. In T. Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press 189.
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  25.  2
    D. P. Carey, Melvyn A. Goodale & E. G. Sprowl (1990). Blindsight in Rodents: The Use of a "High-Level" Distance Cue in Gerbils with Lesions of Primary Visual Cortex. Behavioural Brain Research 38:283-289.
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  26. James Danckert, Patrice Revol, Laure Pisella, Pierre Krolak-Salmon, Alain Vighetto, Melvyn A. Goodale & Yves Rosetti (2003). Measuring Unconscious Actions in Action-Blindsight: Exploring the Kinematics of Pointing Movements to Targets in the Blind Field of Two Patients with Cortical Hemianopia. Neuropsychologia 41 (8):1068-1081.
     
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  27. Claudia Lr Gonzalez, Tzvi Ganel & Melvyn A. Goodale (2009). Hemispheric Specialization for the Visual Control Of. Mind 118 (472):995-1011.
     
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  28. Melvyn A. Goodale, Jonathan S. Cant & Grzegorz Króliczak (2006). Ögmen, Haluk; Breitmeyer, Bruno G. (2006). The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. (Pp. 51-71). Cambridge, MA, US: MIT Press. Xi, 410 Pp. [REVIEW]
  29. Melvyn A. Goodale & K. Murphy (2000). Space in the Brain: Different Neural Substrates for Allocentric and Egocentric Frames of Reference. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press
     
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  30. Melvyn A. Goodale (1997). The Cognitive Neuroscience of Action. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (6):238-238.
     
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