Search results for 'Men' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Aaron Smuts (2007). The Joke is the Thing: 'In the Company of Men' and the Ethics of Humor. Film and Philosophy 11 (1):49-66.score: 24.0
    Any analysis of "In the Company of Men" is forced to answer three questions of central importance to the ethics of humor: (1) What does it (...) mean to find sexist humor funny? (2) What are the various sources of humor? And, (3) can moral flaws with attempts at humor increase their humorousness? I argued that although merely finding a joke funny in a neutral context cannot tell you anything reliable about a person's beliefs, in context, a joke may reveal a great deal about ones social attitudes, or feelings of insecurity. Especially in its portrayal of Howard, the film exposes the role of insecurity as a source of humor. Not only can insecurity make one more prone to laugh, but it can also make someone seem funnier in some contexts. I contended that this shows that a strong version of the superiority theory of humor is clearly wrong. Furthermore, the disparate audience reactions to Chad's jokes showed that the morally sensitive who were aware of the purpose of his jokes would see them as ethically flawed. Rather than making the jokes more amusing, the fact that the jokes were considered to be ethically flawed made them less funny. Hence, immoralism is most likely false. (shrink)
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  2. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2014). Paternal-Fetal Harm and Men's Moral Duty to Use Contraception: Applying the Principles of Nonmaleficence and Beneficence to Men's Reproductive Responsibility. Medicine Studies 4 (1-4):1-13.score: 24.0
    Discussions of reproductive responsibility generally draw heavily upon the principles of nonmaleficence and beneficence. However, these principles are typically only applied to women due to the incorrect (...)
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  3. Eddy S. Ng & Willi H. Wiesner (2007). Are Men Always Picked Over Women? The Effects of Employment Equity Directives on Selection Decisions. Journal of Business Ethics 76 (2):177 - 187.score: 24.0
    This study replicates and extends previous work by Oppenheimer and Wiesner [1990, Sex discrimination: Who is hired and do employment equity statements make a difference? Proceedings of (...)
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  4. Stephen B. Kennedy, Sherry Nolen, Zhenfeng Pan, Betty Smith, Jeffrey Applewhite & Kenneth J. Vanderhoff (2013). Effectiveness of a Brief Condom Promotion Program in Reducing Risky Sexual Behaviours Among African American Men. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (2):408-413.score: 21.0
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  5. Melina Gattellari & Jeanette E. Ward (2005). Measuring Men's Preferences for Involvement in Medical Care: Getting the Question Right. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 11 (3):237-246.score: 21.0
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  6. Loren E. Pedersen (1991). Dark Hearts: The Unconscious Forces That Shape Men's Lives. Shambhala.score: 21.0
  7. Toni Adleberg, Morgan Thompson & Eddy Nahmias (forthcoming). Do Men and Women Have Different Philosophical Intuitions? Further Data. Philosophical Psychology:1-27.score: 18.0
    To address the underrepresentation of women in philosophy effectively, we must understand the causes of the loss of women after their initial philosophy classes. In this paper (...)
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  8. Allan Mazur & Alan Booth (1998). Testosterone and Dominance in Men. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):353-363.score: 18.0
    In men, high levels of endogenous testosterone (T) seem to encourage behavior intended to dominate other people. Sometimes dominant behavior is aggressive, its apparent intent being to (...)
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  9. Hugh LaFollette (1992). Real Men. In Larry May & Robert Strikwerda (eds.), Masculinity. Rowman and Littlefield. 59--74.score: 18.0
    "Ah, for the good old days, when men were men and women were women." Men who express such sentiments long for the world where homosexuals were (...) ensconced in their closets and women were sexy, demure, and subservient. That is a world well lost -- though not as lost as I would like. More than a few men still practice misogyny and homophobia. The defects of such attitudes are obvious. My concern here is not to document these defects but to ask how real men, men who reject stereotypical male-female roles -- men who are sensitive to the insights of feminism -- should relate with women. In particular, how should men and women relate in intimate, sexually oriented, i.e., "romantic," relationships. (shrink)
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  10. Alan Soble (1999). Loose Women, Lecherous Men. Teaching Philosophy 22 (4):411-416.score: 18.0
  11. Rani Lill Anjum & Johan Arnt Myrstad, All Men Are Animals: Hypothetical, Categorical, or Material?score: 18.0
    The conditional interpretation of general categorical statements likeAll men are animalsas universally quantified material conditionalsFor all x, if x is F, then x is (...)
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  12. Leslie M. Dawson (1997). Ethical Differences Between Men and Women in the Sales Profession. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (11):1143-1152.score: 18.0
    This research addresses the question of whether men and women in sales differ in their ethical attitudes and decision making. The study asked 209 subjects to respond (...)
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  13. Larry May & Robert Strikwerda (1994). Men in Groups: Collective Responsibility for Rape. Hypatia 9 (2):134 - 151.score: 18.0
    We criticize the following views: only the rapist is responsible since only he committed the act; no one is responsible since rape is a biological response to (...)
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  14. A. Degryse (2011). Sensus Communis as a Foundation for Men as Political Beings: Arendt's Reading of Kant's Critique of Judgment. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (3):345-358.score: 18.0
    In the literature on Hannah Arendts Lectures on Kants Political Philosophy, two sorts of claim have been made by different interpreters. First, there is Beiners (...)
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  15. Linda Lemoncheck (1998). Loose Women, Lecherous Men: A Feminist Philosophy of Sex. Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):369-373.score: 18.0
    Linda LeMoncheck introduces a new way of thinking and talking about women's sexual pleasures, preferences, and desires. Using the tools of contemporary analytic philosophy, she discusses (...)methods for mediating the tensions among apparently irreconcilable feminist perspectives on women's sexuality and shows how a feminist epistemology and ethic can advance the dialogue in women's sexuality across a broad political spectrum. She argues that in order to capture the diversity and complexity of women's sexual experience, women's sexuality must be examined from two equally compelling perspectives: that of women's sexual oppression under conditions of individual and institutional male dominance; and that of women's sexual liberation, both in terms of each woman's pursuit of sexual agency and self-definition, and in terms of women's sexual liberation as a class. Loose Women, Lecherous Men sheds crucial new light on such much-debated topics as promiscuity, adultery, sexual deviance, prostitution, pornography, sexual harassment, and sexual violence against women. Her book supports a dialogue that encourages both women and men to take up a feminist perspective in exploring the meaning and value of sexuality in their lives. (shrink)
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  16. Bertha Alvarez Manninen (2007). Pleading Men and Virtuous Women: Considering the Role of the Father in the Abortion Debate. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (1):1-24.score: 18.0
    Far too often in our society, the input of a potential father is not deemed relevant in a womans abortion decision. Men, however, can suffer emotional (...)strains due to the abortion of their potential child, and given this harm it seems that morality must make room for a potential fathers voice in the abortion decision. I will argue that a man cannot have the right to veto a womans decision to procure an abortion, yet there may be times where a woman may exercise her right to an abortion in a manner not indicative of a virtuous character. This is especially a danger in the face of a dissenting man who may suffer greatly if his potential child is abortedand thus I will delineate circumstances where a virtuous woman would concede to carrying a fetus to term in order to give a man the child he so desperately desires. In addition to using virtue ethics to make the argument, I will incorporate certain aspects of care ethics in order to further what may seem to some to be a rather contentious claim. (shrink)
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  17. Judith N. Shklar (1969). Men and Citizens: A Study of Rousseau's Social Theory. London, Cambridge U.P..score: 18.0
    This book, first published in 1969 and now made available in paperback with a new foreword by the author, is widely regarded as one of the best (...)
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  18. Bob Brecher, Pornography: Men Possessing Women. A Reassessment.score: 18.0
    For a few years in the 1980s, Andrea Dworkins Pornography: Men Possessing Women appeared to have changed the intellectual landscapeas well as some peoples (...)lives. Pornography, she argued, not only constitutes violence against women; it constitutes also the main conduit for such violence, of which rape is at once the prime example and the central image. In short, it is patriarchys most powerful weapon. Given that, feministssingle most important task is to deal with pornography. By the early 1990s, however, the consensus had become that her project was a diversion, both politically and intellectually. Today, who would argue that pornography is a crucial political issue? I shall argue that Dworkin has in fact a great deal to teach usperhaps even more today, as we are going through the neo-liberal revolution, than thirty years ago. Her argument is not a causal one, despite in places reading as if it were. The legal route she chose as the ground on which to fight may well be a dead end, but that does nothing to undermine the force of her analysis. Nor does the fact that she makes arguments that might not be recognized as professionally philosophical or social scientific undermine their substantive force. It may even be that pornography itself is not the sole key she thought it was to understanding and dealing with political realities; but even if that were so, the form of her analysis, far from rhetorical and/or fallacious, is exactly what is needed to counter the depredations of neo-liberalcommon sense”. That she herself found it difficult to find a language beyond that of liberalism to express her argument is no reason either for ignoring or misinterpreting it. (shrink)
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  19. Andreas Vrahimis (2013). "Was There a Sun Before Men Existed?": A. J. Ayer and French Philosophy in the Fifties. Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 1 (9).score: 18.0
    In contrast to many of his contemporaries, A. J. Ayer was an analytic philosopher who had sustained throughout his career some interest in developments in the work (...)
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  20. Linda McDowell (2001). 'It's That Linda Again': Ethical, Practical and Political Issues Involved in Longitudinal Research with Young Men. Ethics, Place and Environment 4 (2):87 – 100.score: 18.0
    In the last few years, geographers have begun to develop a research interest in children's and young people's attitudes to and relationship with place and locality (...). While a range of different types of work has been undertaken, most studies are united by their concern for the ethical and practical issues that are raised when children and young people are the subjects of research. In a thought-provoking paper in this journal, Valentine suggested that five main areas of ethical concern might be distinguished: consent; access and structures of compliance; privacy and confidentiality; methodologies and issues of power; and dissemination and advocacy. As she noted, many of these issues are not unique to research with children but are refracted in particular ways because of the particular legal position of children and the inequalities of power between children and adult research workers. In my own work with working class young men aged 15-17, who were no longer children but not yet adults, I found similarities to but also differences from the concerns identified by Valentine, especially as the research I undertook involved repeat interviews. Issues of access, power and dissemination took a different form. In Valentine's paper, the significance of the class, gender, ethnic, age and other social characteristics of both the interviewer(s) and the interviewees and the impact on their interaction were not considered, whereas I found that they were a significant part of the relationships that took place during the course of the research. I also discuss questions of access and of the location of interviewing, ethical issues that arise in representing the views of young people and in returning the research material to them and the problems of trying to undertake critical social research. (shrink)
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  21. Camilla Flodin (2011). Of Mice and Men: Adorno on Art and the Suffering of Animals. Estetika 48 (2):139-156.score: 18.0
    Theodor W. Adornos criticism of human beingsdomination of nature is a familiar topic to Adorno scholars. Its connection to the central relationship between art and (...)nature in his aesthetics has, however, been less analysed. In the following paper, I claim that Adornos discussion of arts truth content (Wahrheitsgehalt) is to be understood as arts ability to give voice to nature (both human and non-human) since it has been subjugated by the growth of civilization. I focus on repressed non-human nature and examine Adornos interpretation of Eduard Mörikes poemMausfallen-Sprüchlein’ (Mousetrap rhyme). By giving voice to the repressed animal, Mörikes poem manages to point towards the possibility of a changed relationship between mice and men, between nature and humanity, which is necessary in order to achieve reconciliation amongst humans as well. (shrink)
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  22. Timothy F. Murphy (2010). The Ethics of Helping Transgender Men and Women Have Children. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (1):46-60.score: 18.0
    A transgender man legally married to a woman has given birth to two children, raising questions about the ethics of assisted reproductive treatments (ARTs) for people with (...)
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  23. Piers J. Hale (2013). Monkeys Into Men and Men Into Monkeys: Chance and Contingency in the Evolution of Man, Mind and Morals in Charles Kingsley's Water Babies. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 46 (4):551-597.score: 18.0
    The nineteenth century theologian, author and poet Charles Kingsley was a notable populariser of Darwinian evolution. He championed Darwins cause and that of honesty in science (...)for more than a decade from 1859 to 1871. Kingsleys interpretation of evolution shaped his theology, his politics and his views on race. The relationship between men and apes set the context for Kingsleys consideration of these issues. Having defended Darwin for a decade in 1871 Kingsley was dismayed to read Darwins account of the evolution of morals in Descent of Man. He subsequently distanced himself from Darwins conclusions even though he remained an ardent evolutionist until his death in 1875. (shrink)
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  24. Mitchell Aboulafia (2011). Through the Eyes of Mad Men: Simulation, Interaction, and Ethics. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PRAGMATISM AND AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY (2):133-147.score: 18.0
    Traditionally pragmatists have been favorably disposed to improving our understanding of agency and ethics through the use of empirical research. In the last two decades simulation theory (...)
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  25. Robert P. George (1993). Making Men Moral: Civil Liberties and Public Morality. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Contemporary liberal thinkers commonly suppose that there is something in principle unjust about the legal prohibition of putatively victimless crimes. Here Robert P. George defends the traditional (...)
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  26. Alford A. Young Jr (1999). The (Non) Accumulation of Capital: Explicating the Relationship of Structure and Agency in the Lives of Poor Black Men. Sociological Theory 17 (2):201-227.score: 18.0
    The concepts of habitus and capital are crucial in the research tradition of social and cultural reproduction. This article applies both terms to an analysis of aspects (...)
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  27. Walter E. Block & Violet Obioha (2012). War on Black Men: Arguments for the Legalization of Drugs. Criminal Justice Ethics 31 (2):106-120.score: 18.0
    Abstract The leadership of the black community is concerned with welfare, with equality, with unemployment, with discrimination, with racism, with the pay gap, and with dozens of (...)
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  28. Anna-Maija Lämsä, Meri Vehkaperä, Tuomas Puttonen & Hanna-Leena Pesonen (2008). Effect of Business Education on Women and Men Students' Attitudes on Corporate Responsibility in Society. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):45 - 58.score: 18.0
    This article describes a survey among Finnish business students to find answers to the following questions: How do business students define a well-run company? What are (...)their attitudes on the responsibilities of business in society? Do the attitudes of women students differ from those of men? What is the influence of business education on these attitudes? Our sample comprised 217 students pursuing a masters degree in business studies at two Finnish universities. The results show that, as a whole, students valued the stakeholder model of the company more than the shareholder model. However, attitudes differed according to gender: women students were more in favor of the stakeholder model and placed more weight on corporate ethical, environmental, and societal responsibilities than their men counterpartsboth at the beginning and at the end of their studies. Thus, no gender socialization effect of business school education could be observed in this sense. Business school education was found to shape women and men studentsattitudes in two ways. Firstly, valuation of the shareholder model increased and, secondly, the importance of equal-opportunity employment decreased in the course of education. This raises the question whether the educational context is creating an undesirable tendency among future business professionals. The results further suggest that the sociocultural context can make a difference in how corporate social responsibility is perceived. The article also discusses possible ways to influence the attitudes of business students. (shrink)
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  29. Harry Brod (1987). The New Men's Studies: From Feminist Theory to Gender Scholarship. Hypatia 2 (1):179 - 196.score: 18.0
    The paper situates the new field of men's studies in the context of the evolution of women's studies. It argues that men's studies' distinctive feminist (...)
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  30. Benjamin Barber (2013). Expositions of Sacrificial Logic: Girard, Žižek, and Cormac McCarthy's No Country for Old Men. Contagion 20 (1):163-179.score: 18.0
    Cormac McCarthys No Country for Old Men, and Joel and Ethan Coens film adaptation of the same name, deliver two separate critiques of sacrificial violence through (...) their particular renderings of Carla Jean Mosss death scene, as they correspond, respectively, to the theories of René Girard and Slavoj Žižek. In both film and novel, the chase narrative offers a concrete representation of runaway acquisitive mimesis engendering resentment and cathartic violence. This violence is symbolically manifest in the character of Anton Chigurh. An assassin whose killings often employ a ritual of chance, Chigurh is a symbol for both the violence foundational to culture and the fascinating draw such violence continues to have .. (shrink)
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  31. Terrell Carver (2004). Men in Political Theory. Published Exclusively in the Usa by Palgrave.score: 18.0
    Men in Political Theory builds on feminist re-readings of the traditional canon of male writers in political philosophy by turning the "gender lens" on to the (...)representation of men in widely studied texts. It explains the distinction between "man" as an apparently de-gendered "individual" or "citizen" and "man" as an overtly gendered being in human society. The ten chapters on Plato, Aristotle, Jesus, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx and Engels show the operation of the "gender lens" in different ways, depending on how each philosopher deploys concepts of men and masculinity to pose and solve classic problems. (shrink)
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  32. Elisa Audo (2009). A Review ofThe Macho Paradox: Why Some Men Hurt Women and How All Men Can Help”. [REVIEW] World Futures 65 (5):442-446.score: 18.0
    (2009). A Review ofThe Macho Paradox: Why Some Men Hurt Women and How All Men Can Help”. World Futures: Vol. 65, Sustainable Development in Practice, pp. (...)
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  33. Melissa Hines (1998). Adult Testosterone Levels Have Little or No Influence on Dominance in Men. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):377-378.score: 18.0
    There is substantial evidence that psychological factors influence human testosterone levels, but little support if any for an influence of circulating testosterone on dominance in men. Persistent (...)
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  34. Mary A. Konovsky & Frank Jaster (1989). Blaming the Victimand Other Ways Business Men and Women Account for Questionable Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 8 (5):391 - 398.score: 18.0
    Impression management refers to behaviors used by individuals to control the impressions they make on audiences. This study demonstrated that business men and women were more likely (...)
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  35. Elizabeth Cashdan (1998). Why is Testosterone Associated with Divorce in Men? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):366-366.score: 18.0
    There is evidence that in women high levels of testosterone are associated with more sexual partners and more permissive sexual attitudes. If a similar relationship holds true (...)
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  36. Satoshi Kanazawa & Mary C. Still (2000). Why Men Commit Crimes (and Why They Desist). Sociological Theory 18 (3):434-447.score: 18.0
    Hirschi and Gottfredson (1983) claim that the relationship between age and crime is similar in all social and cultural conditions and that no current sociological or criminological (...)
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  37. Anthony Ashley Cooper Shaftesbury (1963). Characteristics of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times, Etc. Gloucester, Mass.,Peter Smith.score: 18.0
    Between the two men there is perhaps little to choose on the point of principle, since Berkeley implicitly justifies the subordination of truth to supposed ...
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  38. Harry Brod (1987). Does Manning Men's Studies Emasculate Women's Studies? Hypatia 2 (2):153 - 156.score: 18.0
    Defends "The New Men's Studies: From Feminist Theory to Gender Scholarship" (Hypatia 2:1, Winter 1987) against what is argued are Mary Libertin's misreadings. The argument (...)
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  39. Michael R. Dietrich (2000). Of Moths and Men: Theo Lang and the Persistence of Richard Goldschmidt's Theory of Homosexuality, 1916-1960. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 22 (2):219 - 247.score: 18.0
    Using an analogy between moths and men, in 1916, Richard Goldschmidt proposed that homosexuality was a case of genetic intersexuality. As he strove to create a unified (...)
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  40. Alice H. Eagly (2000). Do Don Juans Have Better Genes Than Family Men? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):601-602.score: 18.0
    An alternative interpretation of Gangestad & Simpson's findings features the assumption that only a subgroup of those men who are low in fluctuating asymmetry are typically available (...)
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  41. Leslie Rebecca Bloom (1997). A Feminist Reading of Men's Health: Or, When Paglia Speaks, the Media Listens. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 18 (1):59-73.score: 18.0
    In this paper Bloom analyzes the popular magazine, Men's Health, from a feminist perspective, locating ways that the magazine participates in an insidious form of anti-feminist (...) backlash. She specifically analyzes the magazine to make sense of how its writers discursively position women in their relationships to heterosexual men and how they use the voices of women who call themselves feminists to promote an anti-feminist, pro-patriarchy agenda. She demonstrates that thehealthof men being promoted in this magazine is a mental health grounded in the maintenance of male privilege and power. (shrink)
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  42. Mary Libertin (1987). The Politics of Women's Studies and Men's Studies. Hypatia 2 (2):143 - 152.score: 18.0
    This paper is a response to the problematic relation between men's studies and women's studies; it is also a particular response to Harry Brod's discussion (...)
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  43. Ray Over & Gabriel Phillips (1997). Differences Between Men and Women in Age Preferences for a Same-Sex Partner. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):138-140.score: 18.0
    We show through analysis of personal advertisements that age preferences for a homosexual or lesbian partner are similar to differences found between men and women in age (...)
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  44. János M. Réthelyi & Mária S. Kopp (2004). Hierarchy Disruption: Women and Men. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):305-307.score: 18.0
    The application of evolutionary perspectives to analyzing sex differences in aggressive behavior and dominance hierarchies has been found useful in multiple areas. We draw attention to the (...)
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  45. Slhaw-Niw Shih & Fu-Jin Shih (1999). Health Needs of Lone Elderly Chinese Men with Heart Disease During Their Hospitalization. Nursing Ethics 6 (1):58-72.score: 18.0
    Hospitalization is a unique health-illness transition for most elderly people. Whether the patient's health-related needs are met or not often iiifluence his or her appraisal (...)
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  46. Marshall Schminke & Maureen L. Ambrose (1997). Asymmetric Perceptions of Ethical Frameworks of Men and Women in Business and Nonbusiness Settings. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (7):719-729.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the relationship between individuals' gender and their ethical decision models. The study seeks to identify asymmetries in men's and women's approaches to ethical (...) decision making and differences in their perceptions of how same-sex and other-sex managers would likely act in business and nonbusiness situations that present an ethical dilemma. Results indicate that the models employed by men and women differ in both business and nonbusiness settings, that both sexes report changing models when leaving business settings, and that women were better predictors of both sex's likely ethical models. (shrink)
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  47. Rebecca Bliege Bird, Brian F. Codding & Douglas W. Bird (2009). What Explains Differences in Men's and Women's Production? Human Nature 20 (2):105-129.score: 18.0
    Researchers commonly use long-term average production inequalities to characterize cross-cultural patterns in foraging divisions of labor, but little is known about how the strategies of individuals (...) shape such inequalities. Here, we explore the factors that lead to daily variation in how much men produce relative to women among Martu, contemporary foragers of the Western Desert of Australia. We analyze variation in foraging decisions on temporary foraging camps and find that the percentage of total camp production provided by each gender varies primarily as a function of mens average bout successes with large, mobile prey. When men target large prey, either their success leads to a large proportional contribution to the daily harvest, or their failure results in no contribution. When both men and women target small reliable prey, production inequalities by gender are minimized. These results suggest that production inequalities among Martu emerge from stochastic variation in mens foraging success on large prey measured against the backdrop of womens consistent production of small, low-variance resources. (shrink)
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  48. Kaye V. Cook, Daniel C. Larson & Monique D. Boivin (2003). Moral Voices of Women and Men in the Christian Liberal Arts College: Links Between Views of Self and Views of God. Journal of Moral Education 32 (1):77-89.score: 18.0
    Views of self (using Gilligan's paradigm) and of the Christian God (using a similar, newly-developed paradigm) were explored in 44 first-year and senior Christian college (...)
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  49. Lynne Layton (1984). The Hearts of Men. American Dreams and the Flight From Commitment. Telos 1984 (61):181-186.score: 18.0
    Ask any of your single female friendsand some of your married onesabout men, and they will likely complain that the men they meet avoid (...)commitment like rats avoid electric shock. Although the therapists of these women may say that they choose men who avoid commitment, a recent television show on being single in America treated millions of viewers to scenarios one hears women repeat a thousand times: a man comes onto a woman like she's water in the desert, smothers her in the first few weeks with flowers, balloon-o-grams, phone calls, and professions of love, says he's never felt so wonderful with a woman in his over-thirty life, and then, as quickly and suddenly as he came on, he disappears. (shrink)
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  50. D. S. (2001). Of Stones, Men and Angels: The Competing Myth of Isabelle Duncan's Pre-Adamite Man (1860). Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (1):59-104.score: 18.0
    Published within weeks of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species, Isabelle Duncan's Pre-Adamite Man (1860) is the first full-length treatment of preadamism by an evangelical. (...)Intended as a reconciliation of Genesis and geology, Duncan's work gained immediacy when it was published shortly after the September 1859 revelations that men had walked among the mammoths. Written in the tradition of evangelical 'Christian philosophy', Pre-Adamite Man deploys innovative biblical hermeneutics and recent trends in geology to set out both a biblical preadamite theory, and an unorthodox angelology. Duncan responded to contemporary secular interpretations of geology by pushing evangelical concordist strategies to new frontiers, filling out an acceptance of an ancient earth with new biblically informed catastrophist proposals and extensions of salvation history, while simultaneously retaining a firm commitment to plenary inspiration. The product is a highly readable book that operates both as an accessible treatment of geology and a theological discourse. Running through six printings between 1860 and 1866, the book was reviewed by many of the period's leading journals and created a minor controversy among evangelicals. This study both brings to life this previously neglected episode in scriptural geology, and adds to recent work on Victorian popular science writing. (shrink)
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