Search results for 'Mental Act' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David Gurnham (2008). “Reader, I Detained Him Under the Mental Health Act”: A Literary Response to Professor Fennell's Best Interests and Treatment for Mental Disorder. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (3):268-278.score: 192.0
    This is a response to Professor Fennell's paper on the recent influence and impact of the best interests test on the treatment of patients detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 (MHA) for mental disorder. I discuss two points of general ethical significance raised by Professor Fennell. Firstly, I consider his argument on the breadth of the best interests test, incorporating as it does factors considerably wider than those of medical justifications and the risk of harm. Secondly, I (...)
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  2. Joëlle Proust (2001). A Plea for Mental Acts. Synthese 129 (1):105-128.score: 156.0
    A prominent but poorly understood domain of human agency is mental action, i.e., thecapacity for reaching specific desirable mental statesthrough an appropriate monitoring of one's own mentalprocesses. The present paper aims to define mentalacts, and to defend their explanatory role againsttwo objections. One is Gilbert Ryle's contention thatpostulating mental acts leads to an infinite regress.The other is a different although related difficulty,here called the access puzzle: How can the mindalready know how to act in order to reach (...)
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  3. Larry Hickman (1979). Three Consequences of Ockham's “Mental-Act” Theory. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):99-105.score: 150.0
  4. Natalie F. Banner (2011). The 'Bournewood Gap' and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards in the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (2):123-126.score: 144.0
    The Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DOLS) were recently introduced into the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) via an amendment to mental health legislation in England and Wales. As Shah (2011) discusses, the rationale behind creating these protocols was to close what is commonly referred to as the ‘Bournewood gap’; a legislative loophole that allowed a severely autistic man (H.L.) who did not initially dissent to admission to be detained in a hospital and deprived of his liberty in his ‘best (...)
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  5. Carolyn Johnston (2007). The Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Advance Decisions. Clinical Ethics 2 (2):80-84.score: 144.0
    This article considers the provisions of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 in respect of advance decisions. It considers the new statutory regulation of advance directives (termed 'advance decisions' in the Act) and the formalities necessary to effect an advance decision purporting to refuse life-sustaining treatment. The validity and applicability of advance decisions is discussed with analogy to case law and the clinician's reasonable belief in following an advance decision is considered. The article assesses the new personal welfare Lasting Powers (...)
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  6. Ajit Shah (2011). The Paradox of the Assessment of Capacity Under the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (2):111-115.score: 144.0
    The mental capacity Act 2005 (MCA; Department of Constitutional Affairs 2005) was partially implemented on April 1, 2007, and fully implemented on October 1, 2007, in England and Wales. The MCA provides a statutory framework for people who lack decision-making capacity (DMC) or who have capacity and want to plan for the future when they may lack DMC. Health care and social care providers need to be familiar with the MCA and the associated legal structures and processes. The MCA (...)
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  7. T. Hope, A. Slowther & J. Eccles (2009). Best Interests, Dementia and the Mental Capacity Act (2005). Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (12):733-738.score: 144.0
    The Mental Capacity Act (2005) is an impressive piece of legislation that deserves serious ethical attention, but much of the commentary on the Act has focussed on its legal and practical implications rather than the underlying ethical concepts. This paper examines the approach that the Act takes to best interests. The Act does not provide an account of the underlying concept of best interests. Instead it lists factors that must be considered in determining best interests, and the Code of (...)
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  8. Anthony Maden (2007). England's New Mental Health Act Represents Law Catching Up with Science: A Commentary on Peter Lepping's Ethical Analysis of the New Mental Health Legislation in England and Wales. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):16-.score: 144.0
    When seen in the historical context of psychiatry's relatively recent discovery of violence and risk, along with society's adoption of more risk-averse attitudes, the Mental Health Act 2007 in England and Wales is an ethical and proportionate measure.
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  9. Julian Sheather (2006). The Mental Capacity Act 2005. Clinical Ethics 1 (1):33-36.score: 144.0
    The Mental Capacity Act, which received Royal Assent in April 2005, will come into force in April 2007. The Act puts into statute the legality of interventions in relation to adults who lack capacity to make decisions on their own behalf. The aim of this paper is to outline the main features of the legislation and its impact on those health care professionals who provide care and treatment for incapacitated adults. The paper sets out the underlying ethical principles that (...)
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  10. N. Glover-Thomas (2007). A New 'New' Mental Health Act? Reflections on the Proposed Amendments to the Mental Health Act 1983. Clinical Ethics 2 (1):28-31.score: 144.0
    Since 1998, several attempts have been made to reform the existing mental health legislation - the Mental Health Act 1983. However, all efforts thus far have been resoundingly rejected by mental health charities, psychiatrists and related professions. Following the Government's decision to abandon the draft Mental Health Bill in March 2006, plans to introduce new legislation designed to amend the existing 1983 Act have been published. This shorter bill was introduced before Parliament in November 2006. The (...)
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  11. Jonathan Parker, Bridget Penhale & David Stanley (2011). Research Ethics Review: Social Care and Social Science Research and the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (4):380-400.score: 144.0
    This paper considers concerns that social care research may be stifled by health-focused ethical scrutiny under the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the requirement for an ?appropriate body? to determine ethical approval for research involving people who are deemed to lack capacity under the Act to make decisions concerning their participation and consent in research. The current study comprised an online survey of current practice in university research ethics committees (URECs), and explored through semi-structured interviews the views of social (...)
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  12. Christine Rowley, Dexter Perry, Rebecca Brickwood & Nicola Mellor (2013). A Mental Capacity Act 2005 Questionnaire. Clinical Ethics 8 (1):15-18.score: 144.0
    The hospital's clinical ethics committee sought to gauge health-care professionals’ level of knowledge and usage of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 within the hospital trust. The hospital's personnel were asked to complete a 10 part questionnaire relating to the basic contents of the Act. Four hundred questionnaires were distributed and 249 (62%) were returned completed and valid for analysis. A ‘pass-mark’ of 70% (7/10) was assumed; the results showed that 48% of respondents scored ≤50% (≤5/10), 74% of respondents scored (...)
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  13. T. Lucas (2008). Implementing the Mental Capacity Act and the Code of Practice – a Developing Scenario. Clinical Ethics 3 (2):63-68.score: 144.0
    This article sets out a scenario highlighting some of the issues to be faced by NHS hospitals when dealing with patients who may require treatment under the Mental Capacity Act 2005. The article sets out matters to consider when dealing with patients in A&E, assessments of best interests, emergency treatment, lasting powers of attorney and transferring patients to nursing homes. All of these matters come under the remit of the Act.
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  14. Peter T. Geach (1957). Mental Acts: Their Content And Their Objects. Humanities Press.score: 136.0
    ACT, CONTENT, AND OBJECT THE TITLE I have chosen for this work is a mere label for a set of problems; the controversial views that have historically been ...
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  15. Richard W. Taylor (1963). The Stream of Thoughts Versus Mental Acts. Philosophical Quarterly 13 (October):311-321.score: 130.0
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  16. Alfred C. Ewing (1948). Mental Acts. Mind 57 (April):201-220.score: 130.0
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  17. W. B. Gallie (1948). Dr Ewing on Mental Acts. Mind 57 (October):480-487.score: 130.0
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  18. Richard E. Aquila (1976). Intentionality: A Study Of Mental Acts. Penn St University Press.score: 130.0
  19. W. B. Gallie (1947). Does Psychology Study Mental Acts or Dispositions, Part I. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 134:134-153.score: 130.0
     
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  20. C. A. Mace (1947). Does Psychology Study Mental Acts or Dispositions, Part III. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 164:164-174.score: 130.0
     
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  21. W. J. H. Sprott (1947). Does Psychology Study Mental Acts or Dispositions, Part II. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 154:154-163.score: 130.0
     
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  22. Elizabeth Fistein (2012). The Mental Capacity Act and Conceptions of the Good. In Lubomira Radoilska (ed.), Autonomy and Mental Disorder. Oxford University Press.score: 126.0
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  23. Jean-Francois Bonnefon (2007). Reasons to Act and the Mental Representation of Consequentialist Aberrations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):453-454.score: 126.0
    If imagination is guided by the same principles as rational thoughts, then we ought not to stop at the way people make inferences to get insights about the workings of imagination; we ought to consider as well the way they make rational choices. This broader approach accounts for the puzzling effect of reasons to act on the mutability of actions.
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  24. Malcolm Kinney (2009). Being Assessed Under the 1983 Mental Health Act—Can It Ever Be Ethical? Ethics and Social Welfare 3 (3):329-336.score: 120.0
  25. C. Johnston & J. Liddle (2007). The Mental Capacity Act 2005: A New Framework for Healthcare Decision Making. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (2):94-97.score: 120.0
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  26. Peter Herissone-Kelly (2010). Capacity and Consent in England and Wales: The Mental Capacity Act Under Scrutiny. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (03):344-352.score: 120.0
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  27. S. Fovargue & J. Miola (2011). Assessing and Detaining Those Who Are Mentally Disordered Under the Mental Health Act 1983 and Mental Capacity Act 2005: Part 1. [REVIEW] Clinical Ethics 6 (1):11-14.score: 120.0
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  28. K. Diesfeld (1997). Consensus for Change: A Report on a Major Conference to Consider the Need for a Fundamental Review of the Mental Health (Scotland) Act 1984. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (5):334-334.score: 120.0
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  29. Anna Hp Kirby (1915). Notes on the Present Working of the Mental Deficiency Act. The Eugenics Review 7 (2):133.score: 120.0
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  30. Jill Peay (1986). The Mental Health Act 1983 (England and Wales): Legal Safeguards in Limbo. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 14 (3-4):180-189.score: 120.0
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  31. P. Bean, W. Bingley, I. Bynoe, A. Faulkner, E. Rassaby & A. Rogers (forthcoming). Out of Harm's Way: National Association for Mental Health's (MIND's) Research Into Police and Psychiatric Action Under Section 136 of the Mental Health Act. Mind.score: 120.0
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  32. N. L. G. Eastman (1985). A Guide to The Mental Health Act 1983. Journal of Medical Ethics 11 (3):163-163.score: 120.0
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  33. R. Langdon-Down (1914). A Guide to the Mental Deficiency Act, 1913. The Eugenics Review 6 (1):65.score: 120.0
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  34. Benjamin Libet (1987). Are the Mental Experiences of Will and Self-Control Significant for the Performance of a Voluntary Act? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):783.score: 120.0
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  35. H. Tasman Lovell (1923). The Tasmanian Mental Deficiency Act. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 1 (4):285 – 289.score: 120.0
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  36. J. V. McHale (2009). Research Ethics Review and Mental Capacity: Where Now After the Mental Capacity Act 2005? Research Ethics 5 (2):65-70.score: 120.0
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  37. R. Wilkinson (2005). Reviewing Research with Mentally Incapacitated Adults: What RECs Need to Consider Under the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Research Ethics 1 (4):127-131.score: 120.0
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  38. Sara Fovargue (2009). Deprivation of Liberty Under the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Clinical Ethics 4 (1):10-11.score: 120.0
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  39. Sara Fovargue & José Miola (2011). Treating Those Who Are Mentally Disordered Under the Mental Health Act 1983: Part 2. Clinical Ethics 6 (2):64-67.score: 120.0
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  40. Evelyn Fox (1918). The Mental Deficiency Act. The Eugenics Review 10 (1):1.score: 120.0
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  41. T. Hope (1999). Reforming the 1983 Mental Health Act. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (5):363-364.score: 120.0
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  42. E. J. Lidbetter (1925). The Present Position of Mental Deficiency Under the Act. The Eugenics Review 16 (4):259.score: 120.0
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  43. Joëlle Proust (forthcoming). Mental Acts as Natural Kinds. In Till Vierkant, Julian Kieverstein & Andy Clark (eds.), Decomposing the will. Oxford University Press.score: 100.0
    This chapter examines whether, and in what sense, one can speak of agentive mental events. An adequate characterization of mental acts should respond to three main worries. First, mental acts cannot have pre-specified goal contents. For example, one cannot prespecify the content of a judgment or of a deliberation. Second, mental acts seem to depend crucially on receptive attitudes. Third, it does not seem that intentions play any role in mental actions. Given these three constraints, (...)
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  44. Indrek Reiland (2012). Propositional Attitudes and Mental Acts. Thought 1 (3):239-245.score: 96.0
    Peter Hanks and Scott Soames have recently developed similar views of propositional attitudes on which they consist at least partly of being disposed to perform mental acts. Both think that to believe a proposition is at least partly to be disposed to perform the primitive propositional act: one the performance of which is part of the performance of any other propositional act. However, they differ over whether the primitive act is the forceless entertaining or the forceful judging. In this (...)
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  45. Andrei A. Buckareff (2005). How (Not) to Think About Mental Action. Philosophical Explorations 8 (1):83-89.score: 96.0
    I examine Galen Strawson's recent work on mental action in his paper, 'Mental Ballistics or The Involuntariness of Spontaneity'. I argue that his account of mental action is too restrictive. I offer a means of testing tokens of mental activity types to determine if they are actional. The upshot is that a good deal more mental activity than Strawson admits is actional.
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  46. Gregory Boudreaux (1977). Freud on the Nature of Unconscious Mental Processes. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 7 (March):1-32.score: 90.0
  47. Richard I. Sikora (1975). Rorty's New Mark of the Mental. Analysis 35 (June):192-94.score: 90.0
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  48. Stuart Silvers (ed.) (1989). Representation: Readings In The Philosophy Of Mental Representation. Dordrecht: Kluwer.score: 90.0
    One kind of philosopher takes it as a working hypothesis that belief/desire psychology (or, anyhow, some variety of prepositional attitude psychology) is ...
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  49. Stephen J. Noren (1979). Anomalous Monism, Events, and 'the Mental'. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 40 (September):64-74.score: 90.0
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  50. Adrian C. Moulyn (1947). Mechanisms and Mental Phenomena. Philosophy of Science 14 (July):242-253.score: 90.0
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