Search results for 'Mental Process' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. R. Norman, D. Sellman & C. Warner (2006). Mental Capacity, Good Practice and the Cyclical Consent Process in Research Involving Vulnerable People. Clinical Ethics 1 (4):228-233.score: 48.0
    The Mental Capacity Act 2005 gives statutory force to the common law principle that all adults are assumed to have capacity to make decisions unless proven otherwise. In accord with best practice, this principle places the evidential burden on researchers rather than participants and requires researchers to take account of short-term and transient understandings common among some research populations. The aim of this paper is to explore some of the implications of the MCA 2005 for researchers working with 'vulnerable' (...)
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  2. Itay Shani (2013). Making It Mental: In Search for the Golden Mean of the Extended Cognition Controversy. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):1-26.score: 45.0
    This paper engages the extended cognition controversy by advancing a theory which fits nicely into an attractive and surprisingly unoccupied conceptual niche situated comfortably between traditional individualism and the radical externalism espoused by the majority of supporters of the extended mind hypothesis. I call this theory moderate active externalism, or MAE. In alliance with other externalist theories of cognition, MAE is committed to the view that certain cognitive processes extend across brain, body, and world—a conclusion which follows from a theory (...)
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  3. A. M. Bodkin (1907). The Subconscious Factors of Mental Process Considered in Relation to Thought (I). Mind 16 (62):209-228.score: 45.0
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  4. John Laird (1923). Mental Process and the Conscious Quality. Mind 32 (127):273-288.score: 45.0
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  5. A. M. Bodkin (1907). The Subconscious Factors of Mental Process Considered in Relation to Thought (II). Mind 16 (63):362-382.score: 45.0
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  6. Hugh A. Reyburn (1919). Mental Process. Mind 28 (109):19-40.score: 45.0
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  7. J. W. Scott (1929). Mental Process. Mind 38 (152):534-536.score: 45.0
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  8. Camillo Padoa-Schioppa, Lucia Jandolo & Elisabetta Visalberghi (2006). Multi-Stage Mental Process for Economic Choice in Capuchins. Cognition 99 (1):B1-B13.score: 45.0
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  9. Michael D. Rugg (1985). Are the Origins of Any Mental Process Available to Introspection? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):552.score: 45.0
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  10. Ian Tucker (2013). The Spatial Anticipation of the Future in the Homes of Mental Health Service Users. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 14 (1):26 - 40.score: 45.0
    This paper develops an approach to analysing the importance of anticipations of the future on present actions in the lives of mental health service users, for whom sensing stability in the future is important as part of the recovery process. The work of Henri Bergson and Alfred North Whitehead is drawn upon to argue that temporality is understood spatially, and that past and future experience only exist in relation to their shaping of present activity. This process is (...)
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  11. J. Christopher Maloney (1990). Mental Misrepresentation. Philosophy of Science 57 (September):445-58.score: 42.0
    An account of the contents of the propositional attitudes is fundamental to the success of the cognitive sciences if, as seems correct, the cognitive sciences do presuppose propositional attitudes. Fodor has recently pointed the way towards a naturalistic explication of mental content in his Psychosemantics (1987). Fodor's theory is a version of the causal theory of meaning and thus inherits many of its virtues, including its intrinsic plausibility. Nevertheless, the proposal may suffer from two deficiencies: (1) It seems not (...)
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  12. Tobias U. Hauser, Stephanie Rotzer, Roland H. Grabner, Susan Mérillat & Lutz Jäncke (2013). Enhancing Performance in Numerical Magnitude Processing and Mental Arithmetic Using Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 42.0
    The ability to accurately process numerical magnitudes and solve mental arithmetic is of highest importance for schooling and professional career. Although impairments in these domains in disorders such as developmental dyscalculia (DD) are highly detrimental, remediation is still sparse. In recent years, transcranial brain stimulation methods such as transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) have been suggested as a treatment for various neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is known to be crucially involved in numerical magnitude (...)
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  13. Daniel C. Dennett (1983). Styles of Mental Representation. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 83:213-226.score: 39.0
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  14. Donald Levy (1983). Post-Hypnotic Suggestion and the Existence of Unconscious Mental Activity. Analysis 43 (October):184-189.score: 39.0
  15. Bjorn Ramberg (2004). Naturalizing Idealizations: Pragmatism and the Interpretivist Strategy. Contemporary Pragmatism 1 (2):1-63.score: 37.0
    Following Quine, Davidson, and Dennett, I take mental states and linguistic meaning to be individuated with reference to interpretation. The regulative principle of ideal interpretation is to maximize rationality, and this accounts for the distinctiveness and autonomy of the vocabulary of agency. This rationality-maxim can accommodate empirical cognitive-psychological investigation into the nature and limitations of human mental processing. Interpretivism is explicitly anti-reductionist, but in the context of Rorty's neo-pragmatism provides a naturalized view of agents. The interpretivist strategy affords (...)
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  16. David E. Guinn (2002). Mental Competence, Caregivers, and the Process of Consent: Research Involving Alzheimer's Patients or Others with Decreasing Mental Capacity. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (03):230-245.score: 36.0
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  17. Grant R. Gillett (1988). Consciousness and Brain Function. Philosophical Psychology 1 (3):325-39.score: 36.0
    Abstract The language of consciousness and that of brain function seem vastly different and incommensurable ways of approaching human mental life. If we look at what we mean by consciousness we find that it has a great deal to do with the sensitivity and responsiveness shown by a subject toward things that happen. Philosophically, we can understnd ascriptions of consciousness best by looking at the conditions which make it true for thinkers who share the concept to say that one (...)
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  18. J. M. Atkinson (2007). Protecting or Empowering the Vulnerable? Mental Illness, Communication and the Research Process. Research Ethics 3 (4):134-138.score: 36.0
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  19. Brian V. Funt (1983). A Parallel‐Process Model of Mental Rotation. Cognitive Science 7 (1):67-93.score: 36.0
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  20. D. W. Green (1993). Mental Models: Rationality, Representation and Process. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):352.score: 36.0
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  21. Tiaan Schutte & Ugasvaree Subramaney (2013). 'Single' V. 'Panel' Appointed Forensic Mental Observations: Is the Referral Process Ethically Justifiable? South African Journal of Bioethics and Law 6 (2):64.score: 36.0
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  22. Nicki Marquardt (2010). Implicit Mental Processes in Ethical Management Behavior. Ethics and Behavior 20 (2):128 – 148.score: 34.0
    This article examines the relationship between implicit mental processes and ethical decisions made by managers. Based on the dual-process view in social and cognitive psychology, it is argued that social cognition (e.g., moral judgments) can rely on two different modes of information processing. On one hand, moral judgments reflect explicit, conscious, and extensive cognitive processes, which are attributed to explicit attitude. On the other hand, moral judgments may also be based on implicit, automatic, and effortless processes referring to (...)
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  23. Alfred C. Ewing (1948). Mental Acts. Mind 57 (April):201-220.score: 33.0
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  24. Alastair Hannay (1971). Mental Images: A Defense. Allen & Unwin.score: 33.0
    Reissue from the classic Muirhead Library of Philosophy series (originally published between 1890s - 1970s).
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  25. Thomas K. Metzinger (2013). The Myth of Cognitive Agency Subpersonal Thinking as a Cyclically Recurring Loss of Mental Autonomy. Frontiers in Psychology 4:931.score: 33.0
    This metatheoretical paper investigates mind wandering from the perspective of philosophy of mind. It has two central claims. The first is that on a conceptual level, mind wandering can be fruitfully described as a specific form of mental autonomy loss. The second is that most of what we call “conscious thought” is better analysed as a subpersonal process that more often than not lacks crucial properties traditionally taken to be the hallmark of personal-level cognition, such as mental (...)
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  26. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (1980). Computation and Cognition: Issues in the Foundation of Cognitive Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):111-32.score: 33.0
    The computational view of mind rests on certain intuitions regarding the fundamental similarity between computation and cognition. We examine some of these intuitions and suggest that they derive from the fact that computers and human organisms are both physical systems whose behavior is correctly described as being governed by rules acting on symbolic representations. Some of the implications of this view are discussed. It is suggested that a fundamental hypothesis of this approach (the "proprietary vocabulary hypothesis") is that there is (...)
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  27. Jean-Pierre Royet, Chantal Delon-Martin & Jane Plailly (2013). Odor Mental Imagery in Non-Experts in Odors: A Paradox? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 33.0
  28. Tyler Burge (1986). Individualism and Psychology. Philosophical Review 95 (January):3-45.score: 30.0
  29. Gilbert Ryle (1949/2002). The Concept of Mind. Hutchinson and Co.score: 30.0
    This now-classic work challenges what Ryle calls philosophy's "official theory," the Cartesians "myth" of the separation of mind and matter. Ryle's linguistic analysis remaps the conceptual geography of mind, not so much solving traditional philosophical problems as dissolving them into the mere consequences of misguided language. His plain language and esstentially simple purpose place him in the traditioin of Locke, Berkeley, Mill, and Russell.
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  30. Jerome A. Shaffer (1961). Could Mental States Be Brain Processes? Journal of Philosophy 58 (December):813-22.score: 30.0
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  31. John Haugeland (1985). Artificial Intelligence: The Very Idea. Cambridge: Mit Press.score: 30.0
    The idea that human thinking and machine computing are "radically the same" provides the central theme for this marvelously lucid and witty book on...
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  32. Robert C. Coburn (1963). Shaffer on the Identity of Mental States and Brain Processes. Journal of Philosophy 60 (February):89-92.score: 30.0
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  33. Robert van Gulick (1989). What Difference Does Consciousness Make? Philosophical Topics 17 (1):211-30.score: 30.0
  34. Andrew A. Brennan (1987). Discontinuity and Identity. Noûs 21 (June):241-60.score: 30.0
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  35. Todd Jones (1991). Staving Off Catastrophe: A Critical Notice of Jerry Fodor's Psychosemantics. Mind and Language 6 (1):58-82.score: 30.0
  36. Bill Wringe (2003). Simulation, Co-Cognition, and the Attribution of Emotional States. European Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):353-374.score: 30.0
  37. Holger Schultheis & Thomas Barkowsky (2011). Casimir: An Architecture for Mental Spatial Knowledge Processing. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):778-795.score: 30.0
    Mental spatial knowledge processing often uses spatio-analogical or quasipictorial representation structures such as spatial mental models or mental images. The cognitive architecture Casimir is designed to provide a framework for computationally modeling human spatial knowledge processing relying on these kinds of representation formats. In this article, we present an overview of Casimir and its components. We briefly describe the long-term memory component and the interaction with external diagrammatic representations. Particular emphasis is placed on Casimir’s working memory and (...)
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  38. Herbert R. Otto (ed.) (1988). Perspectives On Mind. Dordrecht: Kluwer.score: 30.0
    INTRODUCTION Phenomenology and analytic philosophy have skirmished often, but seldom in ways conducive to dialectical progress. ...
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  39. Jerry A. Fodor (1987). A Situated Grandmother. Mind and Language 2 (1):64-81.score: 30.0
  40. John Heil & Alfred Mele (eds.) (1993). Mental Causation. Clarendon Press.score: 30.0
    I argue that the two standard models of mental causation fail to capture the crucial causal relevance of the reason-giving relations involved. Their common error is an exclusively mechanical conception of causation, on which any justification is bound to be independent of the causal process involved, based upon a general rule from which the correctness of the particular case follows only by subsumption. I establish possibility of an alternative model, by sketching an account of the causal dependence of (...)
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  41. Witold Marciszewski (1997). Rational Beliefs as Produced by Computational Processes. Foundations of Science 2 (1):87-106.score: 30.0
    Intelligent problem-solving depends on consciously applied methods of thinking as well as inborn or trained skills. The latter are like resident programs which control processes of the kind called (in Unix) daemons. Such a computational process is a fitting reaction to situations (defined in the program in question) which is executed without any command of a computer user (or without any intention of the conscious subject). The study of intelligence should involve methods of recognizing those beliefs whose existence is (...)
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  42. Ronit Goldman, Joseph Tzelgov, Tamar Ben-Shalom & Andrea Berger (2013). Two Separate Processes Affect the Development of the Mental Number Line. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 30.0
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  43. J. R. Knott (1939). Some Effects of 'Mental Set' on the Electrophysiological Processes of the Human Cerebral Cortex. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (4):384.score: 30.0
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  44. M. Patharkar (2011). From Data Processing to Mental Organs: An Interdisciplinary Path to Cognitive Neuroscience. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):218.score: 30.0
    Human brain is a highly evolved coordinating mechanism in the species Homo sapiens. It is only in the last 100 years that extensive knowledge of the intricate structure and complex functioning of the human brain has been acquired, though a lot is yet to be known. However, from the beginning of civilisation, people have been conscious of a 'mind' which has been considered the origin of all scientific and cultural development. Philosophers have discussed at length the various attributes of consciousness. (...)
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  45. Nicole A. Roberts & Mary H. Burleson (2013). Processes Linking Cultural Ingroup Bonds and Mental Health: The Roles of Social Connection and Emotion Regulation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 30.0
    Cultural and ethnic identities influence the relationships individuals seek out and how they feel and behave in these relationships, which can strongly affect mental and physical health through their impacts on emotions, physiology, and behavior. We proposed and tested a model in which ethnocultural identifications and ingroup affiliations were hypothesized explicitly to enhance social connectedness, which would in turn promote expectancy for effective regulation of negative emotions and reduce self-reported symptoms of depression and anxiety. Our sample comprised women aged (...)
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  46. Fernando Broncano (2007). Sujeto y subjetividad en la mente extensa. Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 31 (2):109-133.score: 29.0
    In this paper we aim to defend a version of the thesis of “extended mind” against the criticism of some authors that consider that the “extracraneal” devices cannott acomplish the requirements that the components of mental processes must meet. We propose a quality of integration as a criterion to be a mental process, and we consider that, in some situations, external devices can be considered as meeting this criterion.
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  47. Marcelino Ocaña García (1985). Sujeto y subjetividad en S. Kierkegaard. Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 5 (2):59-80.score: 29.0
    In this paper we aim to defend a version of the thesis of “extended mind” against the criticism of some authors that consider that the “extracraneal” devices cannott acomplish the requirements that the components of mental processes must meet. We propose a quality of integration as a criterion to be a mental process, and we consider that, in some situations, external devices can be considered as meeting this criterion.
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  48. M. Zorzi, M. Bonato, B. Treccani, G. Scalambrin, R. Marenzi & K. Priftis (2011). Neglect Impairs Explicit Processing of the Mental Number Line. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:125-125.score: 28.0
    Converging evidence suggests that visuospatial attention plays a pivotal role in numerical processing, especially when the task involves the manipulation of numerical magnitudes. Visuospatial neglect impairs contralesional attentional orienting not only in perceptual but also in numerical space. Indeed, patients with left neglect show a bias towards larger numbers when mentally bisecting a numerical interval, as if they were neglecting its leftmost part. In contrast, their performance in parity judgements is unbiased, suggesting a dissociation between explicit and implicit processing of (...)
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  49. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2008). The Reality and Classification of Mental Disorders. Dissertation, University of Chicagoscore: 27.0
    This dissertation examines psychiatry from a philosophy of science perspective, focusing on issues of realism and classification. Questions addressed in the dissertation include: What evidence is there for the reality of mental disorders? Are any mental disorders natural kinds? When are disease explanations of abnormality warranted? How should mental disorders be classified? -/- In addressing issues concerning the reality of mental disorders, I draw on the accounts of realism defended by Ian Hacking and William Wimsatt, arguing (...)
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  50. Galen Strawson (1994). Mental Reality. MIT Press.score: 27.0
    Introduction -- A default position -- Experience -- The character of experience -- Understanding-experience -- A note about dispositional mental states -- Purely experiential content -- An account of four seconds of thought -- Questions -- The mental and the nonmental -- The mental and the publicly observable -- The mental and the behavioral -- Neobehaviorism and reductionism -- Naturalism in the philosophy of mind -- Conclusion: The three questions -- Agnostic materialism, part 1 -- Monism (...)
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