Search results for 'Mental Process' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert Langs (2014). An Archetypal Mental Coding Process. Biosemiotics 7 (2):299-307.score: 168.0
    This paper presents evidence for a psychological coding process that meets the criteria that define such processes in organic nature and culture. The recognition of these previously unknown encoding sequences is derived from the recent formulation of an adaptive mental module of the mind—the emotion processing mind—that has evolved to cope with traumatic events and the unique, language derived, explicit human awareness of personal mortality. The emergent awareness of death has served as a selection factor for the evolution (...)
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  2. A. M. Bodkin (1907). The Subconscious Factors of Mental Process Considered in Relation to Thought (I). Mind 16 (62):209-228.score: 150.0
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  3. John Laird (1923). Mental Process and the Conscious Quality. Mind 32 (127):273-288.score: 150.0
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  4. A. M. Bodkin (1907). The Subconscious Factors of Mental Process Considered in Relation to Thought (II). Mind 16 (63):362-382.score: 150.0
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  5. Hugh A. Reyburn (1919). Mental Process. Mind 28 (109):19-40.score: 150.0
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  6. Camillo Padoa-Schioppa, Lucia Jandolo & Elisabetta Visalberghi (2006). Multi-Stage Mental Process for Economic Choice in Capuchins. Cognition 99 (1):B1-B13.score: 150.0
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  7. J. W. Scott (1929). Mental Process. Mind 38 (152):534-536.score: 150.0
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  8. Michael D. Rugg (1985). Are the Origins of Any Mental Process Available to Introspection? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):552.score: 150.0
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  9. R. Norman, D. Sellman & C. Warner (2006). Mental Capacity, Good Practice and the Cyclical Consent Process in Research Involving Vulnerable People. Clinical Ethics 1 (4):228-233.score: 144.0
    The Mental Capacity Act 2005 gives statutory force to the common law principle that all adults are assumed to have capacity to make decisions unless proven otherwise. In accord with best practice, this principle places the evidential burden on researchers rather than participants and requires researchers to take account of short-term and transient understandings common among some research populations. The aim of this paper is to explore some of the implications of the MCA 2005 for researchers working with 'vulnerable' (...)
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  10. David E. Guinn (2002). Mental Competence, Caregivers, and the Process of Consent: Research Involving Alzheimer's Patients or Others with Decreasing Mental Capacity. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (03):230-245.score: 120.0
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  11. J. M. Atkinson (2007). Protecting or Empowering the Vulnerable? Mental Illness, Communication and the Research Process. Research Ethics 3 (4):134-138.score: 120.0
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  12. Tiaan Schutte & Ugasvaree Subramaney (2013). 'Single' V. 'Panel' Appointed Forensic Mental Observations: Is the Referral Process Ethically Justifiable? South African Journal of Bioethics and Law 6 (2):64.score: 120.0
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  13. Brian V. Funt (1983). A Parallel‐Process Model of Mental Rotation. Cognitive Science 7 (1):67-93.score: 120.0
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  14. D. W. Green (1993). Mental Models: Rationality, Representation and Process. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):352.score: 120.0
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  15. Tobias U. Hauser, Stephanie Rotzer, Roland H. Grabner, Susan Mérillat & Lutz Jäncke (2013). Enhancing Performance in Numerical Magnitude Processing and Mental Arithmetic Using Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 108.0
    The ability to accurately process numerical magnitudes and solve mental arithmetic is of highest importance for schooling and professional career. Although impairments in these domains in disorders such as developmental dyscalculia (DD) are highly detrimental, remediation is still sparse. In recent years, transcranial brain stimulation methods such as transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) have been suggested as a treatment for various neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is known to be crucially involved in numerical magnitude (...)
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  16. Itay Shani (2013). Making It Mental: In Search for the Golden Mean of the Extended Cognition Controversy. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):1-26.score: 102.0
    This paper engages the extended cognition controversy by advancing a theory which fits nicely into an attractive and surprisingly unoccupied conceptual niche situated comfortably between traditional individualism and the radical externalism espoused by the majority of supporters of the extended mind hypothesis. I call this theory moderate active externalism, or MAE. In alliance with other externalist theories of cognition, MAE is committed to the view that certain cognitive processes extend across brain, body, and world—a conclusion which follows from a theory (...)
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  17. Ian Tucker (2013). The Spatial Anticipation of the Future in the Homes of Mental Health Service Users. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 14 (1):26 - 40.score: 102.0
    This paper develops an approach to analysing the importance of anticipations of the future on present actions in the lives of mental health service users, for whom sensing stability in the future is important as part of the recovery process. The work of Henri Bergson and Alfred North Whitehead is drawn upon to argue that temporality is understood spatially, and that past and future experience only exist in relation to their shaping of present activity. This process is (...)
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  18. J. Christopher Maloney (1990). Mental Misrepresentation. Philosophy of Science 57 (September):445-58.score: 96.0
    An account of the contents of the propositional attitudes is fundamental to the success of the cognitive sciences if, as seems correct, the cognitive sciences do presuppose propositional attitudes. Fodor has recently pointed the way towards a naturalistic explication of mental content in his Psychosemantics (1987). Fodor's theory is a version of the causal theory of meaning and thus inherits many of its virtues, including its intrinsic plausibility. Nevertheless, the proposal may suffer from two deficiencies: (1) It seems not (...)
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  19. Nicki Marquardt (2010). Implicit Mental Processes in Ethical Management Behavior. Ethics and Behavior 20 (2):128 – 148.score: 96.0
    This article examines the relationship between implicit mental processes and ethical decisions made by managers. Based on the dual-process view in social and cognitive psychology, it is argued that social cognition (e.g., moral judgments) can rely on two different modes of information processing. On one hand, moral judgments reflect explicit, conscious, and extensive cognitive processes, which are attributed to explicit attitude. On the other hand, moral judgments may also be based on implicit, automatic, and effortless processes referring to (...)
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  20. Daniel C. Dennett (1983). Styles of Mental Representation. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 83:213-226.score: 90.0
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  21. Donald Levy (1983). Post-Hypnotic Suggestion and the Existence of Unconscious Mental Activity. Analysis 43 (October):184-189.score: 90.0
  22. Nicole A. Roberts & Mary H. Burleson (2013). Processes Linking Cultural Ingroup Bonds and Mental Health: The Roles of Social Connection and Emotion Regulation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 84.0
    Cultural and ethnic identities influence the relationships individuals seek out and how they feel and behave in these relationships, which can strongly affect mental and physical health through their impacts on emotions, physiology, and behavior. We proposed and tested a model in which ethnocultural identifications and ingroup affiliations were hypothesized explicitly to enhance social connectedness, which would in turn promote expectancy for effective regulation of negative emotions and reduce self-reported symptoms of depression and anxiety. Our sample comprised women aged (...)
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  23. Alfred C. Ewing (1948). Mental Acts. Mind 57 (April):201-220.score: 78.0
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  24. Alastair Hannay (1971). Mental Images: A Defense. Allen & Unwin.score: 78.0
    Reissue from the classic Muirhead Library of Philosophy series (originally published between 1890s - 1970s).
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  25. Thomas K. Metzinger (2013). The Myth of Cognitive Agency Subpersonal Thinking as a Cyclically Recurring Loss of Mental Autonomy. Frontiers in Psychology 4:931.score: 78.0
    This metatheoretical paper investigates mind wandering from the perspective of philosophy of mind. It has two central claims. The first is that on a conceptual level, mind wandering can be fruitfully described as a specific form of mental autonomy loss. The second is that most of what we call “conscious thought” is better analysed as a subpersonal process that more often than not lacks crucial properties traditionally taken to be the hallmark of personal-level cognition, such as mental (...)
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  26. Jean-Pierre Royet, Chantal Delon-Martin & Jane Plailly (2013). Odor Mental Imagery in Non-Experts in Odors: A Paradox? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 78.0
  27. Bjorn Ramberg (2004). Naturalizing Idealizations: Pragmatism and the Interpretivist Strategy. Contemporary Pragmatism 1 (2):1-63.score: 74.0
    Following Quine, Davidson, and Dennett, I take mental states and linguistic meaning to be individuated with reference to interpretation. The regulative principle of ideal interpretation is to maximize rationality, and this accounts for the distinctiveness and autonomy of the vocabulary of agency. This rationality-maxim can accommodate empirical cognitive-psychological investigation into the nature and limitations of human mental processing. Interpretivism is explicitly anti-reductionist, but in the context of Rorty's neo-pragmatism provides a naturalized view of agents. The interpretivist strategy affords (...)
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  28. John Heil & Alfred Mele (eds.) (1993). Mental Causation. Clarendon Press.score: 72.0
    I argue that the two standard models of mental causation fail to capture the crucial causal relevance of the reason-giving relations involved. Their common error is an exclusively mechanical conception of causation, on which any justification is bound to be independent of the causal process involved, based upon a general rule from which the correctness of the particular case follows only by subsumption. I establish possibility of an alternative model, by sketching an account of the causal dependence of (...)
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  29. Grant R. Gillett (1988). Consciousness and Brain Function. Philosophical Psychology 1 (3):325-39.score: 72.0
    Abstract The language of consciousness and that of brain function seem vastly different and incommensurable ways of approaching human mental life. If we look at what we mean by consciousness we find that it has a great deal to do with the sensitivity and responsiveness shown by a subject toward things that happen. Philosophically, we can understnd ascriptions of consciousness best by looking at the conditions which make it true for thinkers who share the concept to say that one (...)
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  30. Jerome A. Shaffer (1961). Could Mental States Be Brain Processes? Journal of Philosophy 58 (December):813-22.score: 70.0
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  31. Robert C. Coburn (1963). Shaffer on the Identity of Mental States and Brain Processes. Journal of Philosophy 60 (February):89-92.score: 70.0
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  32. Gregory Boudreaux (1977). Freud on the Nature of Unconscious Mental Processes. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 7 (March):1-32.score: 68.0
  33. Holger Schultheis & Thomas Barkowsky (2011). Casimir: An Architecture for Mental Spatial Knowledge Processing. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):778-795.score: 68.0
    Mental spatial knowledge processing often uses spatio-analogical or quasipictorial representation structures such as spatial mental models or mental images. The cognitive architecture Casimir is designed to provide a framework for computationally modeling human spatial knowledge processing relying on these kinds of representation formats. In this article, we present an overview of Casimir and its components. We briefly describe the long-term memory component and the interaction with external diagrammatic representations. Particular emphasis is placed on Casimir’s working memory and (...)
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  34. M. Patharkar (2011). From Data Processing to Mental Organs: An Interdisciplinary Path to Cognitive Neuroscience. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):218.score: 68.0
    Human brain is a highly evolved coordinating mechanism in the species Homo sapiens. It is only in the last 100 years that extensive knowledge of the intricate structure and complex functioning of the human brain has been acquired, though a lot is yet to be known. However, from the beginning of civilisation, people have been conscious of a 'mind' which has been considered the origin of all scientific and cultural development. Philosophers have discussed at length the various attributes of consciousness. (...)
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  35. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2008). The Reality and Classification of Mental Disorders. Dissertation, University of Chicagoscore: 66.0
    This dissertation examines psychiatry from a philosophy of science perspective, focusing on issues of realism and classification. Questions addressed in the dissertation include: What evidence is there for the reality of mental disorders? Are any mental disorders natural kinds? When are disease explanations of abnormality warranted? How should mental disorders be classified? -/- In addressing issues concerning the reality of mental disorders, I draw on the accounts of realism defended by Ian Hacking and William Wimsatt, arguing (...)
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  36. Galen Strawson (1994). Mental Reality. MIT Press.score: 66.0
    Introduction -- A default position -- Experience -- The character of experience -- Understanding-experience -- A note about dispositional mental states -- Purely experiential content -- An account of four seconds of thought -- Questions -- The mental and the nonmental -- The mental and the publicly observable -- The mental and the behavioral -- Neobehaviorism and reductionism -- Naturalism in the philosophy of mind -- Conclusion: The three questions -- Agnostic materialism, part 1 -- Monism (...)
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  37. Jim Stone (2001). What is It Like to Have an Unconscious Mental State? Philosophical Studies 104 (2):179-202.score: 66.0
    HOST is the theory that to be conscious of a mental state is totarget it with a higher-order state (a `HOS'), either an innerperception or a higher-order thought. Some champions of HOSTmaintain that the phenomenological character of a sensory stateis induced in it by representing it with a HOS. I argue that thisthesis is vulnerable to overwhelming objections that flow largelyfrom HOST itself. In the process I answer two questions: `What isa plausible sufficient condition for a quale's belonging (...)
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  38. Lewis Mehl-Madrona & Gordon Pennycook (2009). Construction of an Aboriginal Theory of Mind and Mental Health. Anthropology of Consciousness 20 (2):85-100.score: 66.0
    Most research on aboriginal mind and mental health has sought to apply or confirm preexisting European-derived theories among aboriginal people. Culture has been underappreciate. An understanding of uniquely aboriginal models for mind and mental health might lead to more effective and robust interventions. To address this issue, a core group of elders from five separate regions of North America was developed to help determine how aboriginal people conceived of mind, self, and identity before European contact. The process (...)
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  39. Philip Gerrans (2007). Mental Time Travel, Somatic Markers and "Myopia for the Future". Synthese 159 (3):459 - 474.score: 66.0
    Patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) are often described as having impaired ability for planning and decision making despite retaining intact capacities for explicit reasoning. The somatic marker hypothesis is that the VMPFC associates implicitly represented affective information with explicit representations of actions or outcomes. Consequently, when the VMPFC is damaged explicit reasoning is no longer scaffolded by affective information, leading to characteristic deficits. These deficits are exemplified in performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) in which (...)
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  40. Enric J. Novella (2010). Mental Health Care and the Politics of Inclusion: A Social Systems Account of Psychiatric Deinstitutionalization. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (6):411-427.score: 66.0
    This paper provides an interpretation, based on the social systems theory of German sociologist Niklas Luhmann, of the recent paradigmatic shift of mental health care from an asylum-based model to a community-oriented network of services. The observed shift is described as the development of psychiatry as a function system of modern society and whose operative goal has moved from the medical and social management of a lower and marginalized group to the specialized medical and psychological care of the whole (...)
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  41. Patricia Backlar & Bentson H. McFarland (1993). A National Survey of Ethics Committees in State Mental Hospitals. HEC Forum 5 (5):272-288.score: 66.0
    In June 1992, a national mail survey was directed to 204 state inpatient psychiatric institutions. This study was implemented following the 1992 Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) requirement that hospitals put in place some means with which to address ethical issues. The goals of the study were: 1. to examine state mental hospital characteristics and their response to the JCAHO requirements; 2. to describe healthcare ethics committee (HEC) composition, function, and role; 3. to study patient and (...)
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  42. Lisanne Weelden, Joost Schilperoord & Alfons Maes (2014). Evidence for the Role of Shape in Mental Representations of Similes. Cognitive Science 38 (2):303-321.score: 66.0
    People mentally represent the shapes of objects. For instance, the mental representation of an eagle is different when one thinks about a flying or resting eagle. This study examined the role of shape in mental representations of similes (i.e., metaphoric comparisons). We tested the prediction that when people process a simile they will mentally represent the entities of the comparison as having a similar shape. We conducted two experiments in which participants read sentences that either did (experimental (...)
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  43. Michael McCubbin & David Cohen (1999). A Systemic and Value-Based Approach to Strategic Reform of the Mental Health System. Health Care Analysis 7 (1):57-77.score: 66.0
    Most writers now recognize that mental health policy and the mental health system are extremely resistant to real changes that reflect genuine biopsychosocial paradigms of mental disorder. Writers bemoaning the intransigence of the mental health system tend to focus on a small analytical level, only to find themselves mired in the rationalities of the existing system. Problems are acknowledged to be system-wide, yet few writers have used a method of analysis appropriate for systemic problems. Drawing upon (...)
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  44. David A. Pollack, Bentson H. McFarland, Robert A. George & Richard H. Angell (1993). Ethics and Value Strategies Used in Prioritizing Mental Health Services in Oregon. HEC Forum 5 (5):322-339.score: 66.0
    The authors describe the ethical considerations underlying the inclusion of mental health services into a prioritizedhealth care system. The Oregon Health Plan is a process for defining and delivering basic health services to an entire state. As the plan was developed, the mental health community needed to decide whether or not to participate in the process and, if so, how. Lengthy discussions among mental health consumers, family members, and providers led to a strategy that emphasized (...)
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  45. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (1980). Computation and Cognition: Issues in the Foundation of Cognitive Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):111-32.score: 66.0
    The computational view of mind rests on certain intuitions regarding the fundamental similarity between computation and cognition. We examine some of these intuitions and suggest that they derive from the fact that computers and human organisms are both physical systems whose behavior is correctly described as being governed by rules acting on symbolic representations. Some of the implications of this view are discussed. It is suggested that a fundamental hypothesis of this approach (the "proprietary vocabulary hypothesis") is that there is (...)
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  46. Josep E. Corbí & Josep L. Prades (2000). Mental Contents, Tracking Counterfactuals, and Implementing Mechanisms. In The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Volume 9: Philosophy of Mind. Charlottesville: Philosophy Doc Ctr. 1-11.score: 66.0
    In the ongoing debate, there are a set of mind-body theories sharing a certain physicalist assumption: whenever a genuine cause produces an effect, the causal efficacy of each of the nonphysical properties that participate in that process is determined by the instantiation of a well-defined set of physical properties. These theories would then insist that a nonphysical property could only be causally efficacious insofar as it is physically implemented. However, in what follows we will argue against the idea that (...)
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  47. Antoine Lutz Heleen A. Slagter, Richard J. Davidson (2011). Mental Training as a Tool in the Neuroscientific Study of Brain and Cognitive Plasticity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 66.0
    Although the adult brain was once seen as a rather static organ, it is now clear that the organization of brain circuitry is constantly changing as a function of experience or learning. Yet, research also shows that learning is often specific to the trained stimuli and task, and does not improve performance on novel tasks, even very similar ones. This perspective examines the idea that systematic mental training, as cultivated by meditation, can induce learning that is not stimulus or (...)
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  48. Enric J. Novella (2008). Theoretical Accounts on Deinstitutionalization and the Reform of Mental Health Services: A Critical Review. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):303-314.score: 66.0
    This article offers a comprehensive critical review of the most popular theoretical accounts on the recent processes of deinstitutionalization and reform of mental health services and their possible underlying factors, focusing in the sharp contrast between the straightforward ideas and models maintained by mainstream psychiatry and the different interpretations delivered by authors coming from the social sciences or applying conceptual tools stemming from diverse social theories. Since all these appraisals tend to illuminate only some aspects of the process (...)
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  49. Sam S. Rakover (1996). The Place of Consciousness in the Information Processing Approach: The Mental-Pool Thought Experiment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):537-538.score: 66.0
    Velmans (1991a; 1991b) proposed that consciousness plays a minor explanatory role in the information processing approach and that unconscious mechanisms process stimuli and responses and intervene between them. In contrast, the present commentary describes a thought experiment suggesting that, although input information is initially processed unconsciously, subsequent processing involves consciousness, and consciousness plays an important role in the explanation of behavior.
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  50. Aymeric Guillot Tadhg E. MacIntyre, Aidan P. Moran, Christian Collet (2013). An Emerging Paradigm: A Strength-Based Approach to Exploring Mental Imagery. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    Mental imagery, or the ability to simulate in the mind information that is not currently perceived by the senses, has attracted considerable research interest in psychology since the early 1970s. Within the past two decades, research in this field – as in cognitive psychology more generally - has been dominated by neuroscientific methods that typically involve comparisons between the imagery performance of participants from clinical populations with those who exhibit apparently normal cognitive functioning. Although this approach has been valuable (...)
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