Search results for 'Mental Processes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jerome A. Shaffer (1961). Could Mental States Be Brain Processes? Journal of Philosophy 58 (December):813-22.score: 60.0
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  2. Colin Allen & Marc D. Hauser (1991). Concept Attribution in Nonhuman Animals: Theoretical and Methodological Problems in Ascribing Complex Mental Processes. Philosophy of Science 58 (2):221-240.score: 60.0
    The demise of behaviorism has made ethologists more willing to ascribe mental states to animals. However, a methodology that can avoid the charge of excessive anthropomorphism is needed. We describe a series of experiments that could help determine whether the behavior of nonhuman animals towards dead conspecifics is concept mediated. These experiments form the basis of a general point. The behavior of some animals is clearly guided by complex mental processes. The techniques developed by comparative psychologists and (...)
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  3. Robert C. Coburn (1963). Shaffer on the Identity of Mental States and Brain Processes. Journal of Philosophy 60 (February):89-92.score: 60.0
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  4. Harald Atmanspacher (2010). Acategorial States in a Representational Theory of Mental Processes. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (5-6):5 - 6.score: 60.0
    We propose a distinction between precategorial, acategorial and categorial states within a scientifically oriented understanding of mental processes. This distinction can be specified by approaches developed in cognitive neuroscience and the analytical philosophy of mind. On the basis of a representational theory of mental processes, acategoriality refers to a form of knowledge that presumes fully developed categorial mental representations, yet refers to nonconceptual experiences in mental states beyond categorial states. It relies on a simultaneous (...)
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  5. Nicki Marquardt (2010). Implicit Mental Processes in Ethical Management Behavior. Ethics and Behavior 20 (2):128 – 148.score: 60.0
    This article examines the relationship between implicit mental processes and ethical decisions made by managers. Based on the dual-process view in social and cognitive psychology, it is argued that social cognition (e.g., moral judgments) can rely on two different modes of information processing. On one hand, moral judgments reflect explicit, conscious, and extensive cognitive processes, which are attributed to explicit attitude. On the other hand, moral judgments may also be based on implicit, automatic, and effortless processes (...)
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  6. Jon Driver, Patrick Haggard & Tim Shallice (eds.) (2008). Mental Processes in the Human Brain. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    The scientific study of the human mind and brain has come of age with the advent of technologically advanced methods for imaging brain structure and activity in health and disease, plus computational theories of cognition. These advances are leading to sophisticated new accounts for how mental processes are implemented in the human brain, but they also raise new challenges. -/- Mental Processes in the Human Brain provides an integrative overview of the rapid advances and future challenges (...)
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  7. Jon Driver, Patrick Haggard & Tim Shallice (2008). Lntroduction: Mental Processes in the Human Brain. In Jon Driver, Patrick Haggard & Tim Shallice (eds.), Mental Processes in the Human Brain. Oup Oxford. 1.score: 60.0
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  8. J. R. Knott (1939). Some Effects of 'Mental Set' on the Electrophysiological Processes of the Human Cerebral Cortex. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (4):384.score: 60.0
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  9. George Ainslie (2007). Game Theory Can Build Higher Mental Processes From Lower Ones. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):16-18.score: 57.0
    The question of reductionism is an obstacle to unification. Many behavioral scientists who study the more complex or higher mental functions avoid regarding them as selected by motivation. Game-theoretic models in which complex processes grow from the strategic interaction of elementary reward-seeking processes can overcome the mechanical feel of earlier reward-based models. Three examples are briefly described. (Published Online April 27 2007).
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  10. Richard A. Carlson (1999). Implicit Representation, Mental States, and Mental Processes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):761-762.score: 57.0
    Dienes & Perner's target article constitutes a significant advance in thinking about implicit knowledge. However, it largely neglects processing details and thus the time scale of mental states realizing propositional attitudes. Considering real-time processing raises questions about the possible brevity of implicit representation, the nature of processes that generate explicit knowledge, and the points of view from which knowledge may be represented. Understanding the propositional attitude analysis in terms of momentary mental states points the way toward answering (...)
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  11. Gregory Boudreaux (1977). Freud on the Nature of Unconscious Mental Processes. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 7 (March):1-32.score: 51.0
  12. John A. Bargh (ed.) (2007). Social Psychology and the Unconscious: The Automaticity of Higher Mental Processes. Psychology Press.score: 51.0
  13. K. Kirsner & G. Speelman (eds.) (1998). Implicit and Explicit Mental Processes. Lawrence Erlbaum.score: 48.0
    The need for synthesis in the domain of implicit processes was the motivation behind this book.
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  14. Ronit Goldman, Joseph Tzelgov, Tamar Ben-Shalom & Andrea Berger (2013). Two Separate Processes Affect the Development of the Mental Number Line. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 48.0
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  15. M. M. Pitman (2013). Mental States, Processes, and Conscious Intent in Libet's Experiments. South African Journal of Philosophy 32 (1):71-89.score: 48.0
    The meaning and significance of Benjamin Libet’s studies on the timing of conscious will have been widely discussed, especially by those wishing to draw sceptical conclusions about conscious agency and free will. However, certain important correctives for thinking about mental states and processes undermine the apparent simplicity and logic of Libet’s data. The appropriateness, relevance and ecological validity of Libet’s methods are further undermined by considerations of how we ought to characterise intentional actions, conscious intention, and what it (...)
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  16. Nicole A. Roberts & Mary H. Burleson (2013). Processes Linking Cultural Ingroup Bonds and Mental Health: The Roles of Social Connection and Emotion Regulation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 48.0
    Cultural and ethnic identities influence the relationships individuals seek out and how they feel and behave in these relationships, which can strongly affect mental and physical health through their impacts on emotions, physiology, and behavior. We proposed and tested a model in which ethnocultural identifications and ingroup affiliations were hypothesized explicitly to enhance social connectedness, which would in turn promote expectancy for effective regulation of negative emotions and reduce self-reported symptoms of depression and anxiety. Our sample comprised women aged (...)
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  17. Mark Wexler, Stephen M. Kosslyn & Alain Berthoz (1998). Motor Processes in Mental Rotation. Cognition 68 (1):77-94.score: 48.0
    Much indirect evidence supports the hypothesis that transformations of mental images are at least in part guided by motor processes, even in the case of images of abstract objects rather than of body parts. For example, rotation may be guided by processes that also prime one to see results of a specific motor action. We directly test the hypothesis by means of a dual-task paradigm in which subjects perform the Cooper-Shepard mental rotation task while executing an (...)
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  18. Richard E. Nisbett & Timothy D. Wilson (1977). Telling More Than We Can Know: Verbal Reports on Mental Processes. Psychological Review 84 (3):231-59.score: 45.0
  19. John Mcclure (1983). Telling More Than They Can Know: The Positivist Account of Verbal Reports and Mental Processes. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 13 (1):111–128.score: 45.0
  20. Lucas Bietti (2011). Cognitive Pragmatics: The Mental Processes of Communication. Philosophical Psychology 25 (4):1-5.score: 45.0
    Philosophical Psychology, Volume 25, Issue 4, Page 623-627, August 2012.
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  21. Daniel Kahneman (2000). A Psychological Point of View: Violations of Rational Rules as a Diagnostic of Mental Processes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (5):681-683.score: 45.0
    The target article focuses exclusively on System 2 and on reasoning rationality: the ability to reach valid conclusions from available information, as in the Wason task. The decision-theoretic concept of coherence rationality requires beliefs to be consistent, even when they are assessed one at a time. Judgment heuristics belong to System 1, and help explain the incoherence of intuitive beliefs.
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  22. Howard Shevrin & D. E. Fritzler (1968). Visual Evoked Response Correlates of Unconscious Mental Processes. Science 161:295-298.score: 45.0
  23. Scott Sturgeon (1988). Maximalism and Mental Processes. Philosophical Studies 53 (2):309 - 314.score: 45.0
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  24. Marvina C. Rich (1979). Verbal Reports on Mental Processes: Issues of Accuracy and Awareness. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 9 (1):29–37.score: 45.0
  25. A. Strauss (1955). Unconscious Mental Processes and the Psychosomatic Concept. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 36:307-19.score: 45.0
  26. Howard Shevrin, W. H. Smith & D. E. Fitzler (1971). Average Evoked Response and Verbal Correlates of Unconscious Mental Processes. Psychophysiology 8:149-62.score: 45.0
  27. G. N. A. Vesey (1968). Wittgenstein on the Myth of Mental Processes. Philosophical Review 77 (3):350-355.score: 45.0
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  28. Walter B. Pillsbury (1911). The Role of the Type in Simple Mental Processes. Philosophical Review 20 (5):498-514.score: 45.0
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  29. Fernando Broncano (2007). Sujeto y subjetividad en la mente extensa. Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 31 (2):109-133.score: 45.0
    In this paper we aim to defend a version of the thesis of “extended mind” against the criticism of some authors that consider that the “extracraneal” devices cannott acomplish the requirements that the components of mental processes must meet. We propose a quality of integration as a criterion to be a mental process, and we consider that, in some situations, external devices can be considered as meeting this criterion.
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  30. Beatrice Edgell (1928). Experimental Study of the Mental Processes Involved in Judgment. By B. P. Stevanovic Ph.D. , Monograph Supplement, British Journal of Psychology. (London: Cambridge University Press. 1927. Pp. 138. Price 10s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 3 (10):251-.score: 45.0
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  31. R. D. Hinshelwood (1997). Primitive Mental Processes: Psychoanalysis and the Ethics of Integration. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (2):121-143.score: 45.0
  32. Jyf Lau, Structured Representations and Systematic Revision in Conscious Mental Processes.score: 45.0
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  33. Chris Mace (1997). Commentary on" Primitive Mental Processes". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (2):145-149.score: 45.0
  34. W. Laurence Thornton (1997). Commentary on" Primitive Mental Processes". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (2):155-158.score: 45.0
  35. John A. Bargh (ed.) (2007). Social Psychology and the Unconscious: The Automaticity of Higher Mental Processes. Frontiers of Social Psychology. Psychology Press.score: 45.0
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  36. Paul Carus (1908). A Monistic Conception of Consciousness: In Reply to Mr. Ayton Wilkinson's Article on "Will-Force" and Mr. Montague's "Are Mental Processes in Space?". The Monist 18 (1):30 - 45.score: 45.0
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  37. Maria Czyzewska, Thomas Hill & Pawel Lewicki (1990). The Ability Versus Intentionality Aspects of Unconscious Mental Processes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):602.score: 45.0
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  38. R. Lance Factor (1977). Self-Deception and the Functionalist Theory of Mental Processes. Personalist 58 (April):115-123.score: 45.0
     
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  39. Marcelino Ocaña García (1985). Sujeto y subjetividad en S. Kierkegaard. Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 5 (2):59-80.score: 45.0
    In this paper we aim to defend a version of the thesis of “extended mind” against the criticism of some authors that consider that the “extracraneal” devices cannott acomplish the requirements that the components of mental processes must meet. We propose a quality of integration as a criterion to be a mental process, and we consider that, in some situations, external devices can be considered as meeting this criterion.
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  40. Clark Glymour (1990). Unconscious Mental Processes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):606-607.score: 45.0
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  41. Robert R. Hoffman (1997). What Neural Network Studies Suggest Regarding the Boundary Between Conscious and Unconscious Mental Processes. In Dan J. Stein (ed.), Cognitive Science and the Unconscious. American Psychiatric Press.score: 45.0
     
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  42. Stephen M. Kerst & James H. Howard (1983). Mental Processes in Magnitude Estimation of Length and Loudness. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 21 (2):141-144.score: 45.0
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  43. K. N. Leibovic (1979). What Are the Links Between Neural Activity and Mental Processes? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):268-269.score: 45.0
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  44. Connie McNabb & Ann Nauman (forthcoming). Behaviorism, While Not Considered an Educational Philosophy, is Most Often Recognized as a Psychological Theory About Human Behavior and Learning. In Their Studies, Behaviorists Focus Only on Observable Human Behavior and Discount Mental Processes. They Believe That All Behavior is Learned, and They Believe That New Learning Is. Behaviorism.score: 45.0
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  45. William Pepperrell Montague (1908). Are Mental Processes in Space? The Monist 18 (1):21-29.score: 45.0
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  46. Agnes Moors & Jan Houweder (2007). Bargh, John A. (2007). Social Psychology and the Unconscious: The Automaticity of Higher Mental Processes. Frontiers of Social Psychology. (Pp. 11-50). New York, NY, US: Psychology Press. X, 341 Pp. [REVIEW]score: 45.0
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  47. Sue Doe Nihm (1984). Self-Reports on Mental Processes: A Response to Birnbaum and Stegner. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (5):426-427.score: 45.0
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  48. Donald A. Norman (1979). Perception, Memory, and Mental Processes. In L. Nilsson (ed.), Perspectives on Memory Research.score: 45.0
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  49. Helmut Pape (2002). What Thought Is For: The Problematic Identity of Mental Processes with Chance Events in Peirce's Idealistic Metaphysics. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 38 (1/2):215 - 251.score: 45.0
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  50. Walter J. Perrig & Alexander Grob (eds.) (2000). Control of Human Behavior, Mental Processes, and Consciousness: Essays in Honor of the 60th Birthday of August Flammer. Erlbaum.score: 45.0
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