Search results for 'Mental health personnel Professional ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. W. Brad Johnson & Gerald P. Koocher (eds.) (2011). Juggling Porcupines in Mental Health Practice: An Ethics Casebook From the Files of Experts. Oxford University Press.
     
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  2. James L. Werth, Elizabeth Reynolds Welfel & G. Andrew H. Benjamin (eds.) (2009). The Duty to Protect: Ethical, Legal, and Professional Considerations for Mental Health Professionals. American Psychological Association.
     
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  3.  43
    Gary George Ford (2000). Ethical Reasoning in the Mental Health Professions. Crc Press.
    The ability to reason ethically is an extraordinarily important aspect of professionalism in any field. Indeed, the greatest challenge in ethical professional practice involves resolving the conflict that arises when the professional is required to choose between two competing ethical principles. Ethical Reasoning in the Mental Health Professions explores how to develop the ability to reason ethically in difficult situations. Other books merely present ethical and legal issues one at a time, along with case examples involving (...)
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  4.  33
    Kenneth Corvo, Donald Dutton & Wan-Yi Chen (2009). Do Duluth Model Interventions with Perpetrators of Domestic Violence Violate Mental Health Professional Ethics? Ethics and Behavior 19 (4):323 – 340.
    In spite of numerous studies of program outcomes finding little or no positive effect on violent behavior, the Duluth model remains the most common program type of interventions with perpetrators of domestic violence. In addition, Duluth model programs often ignore serious mental health and substance abuse issues present in perpetrators. These and other issues of possible threat to mental health professional ethics are reviewed in light of the court-mandated, compulsory nature of most Duluth model (...)
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  5.  14
    Wan-Yi Chen, Donald Dutton & Kenneth Corvo (2009). Do Duluth Model Interventions With Perpetrators of Domestic Violence Violate Mental Health Professional Ethics? Ethics and Behavior 19 (4):323-340.
    In spite of numerous studies of program outcomes finding little or no positive effect on violent behavior, the Duluth model remains the most common program type of interventions with perpetrators of domestic violence. In addition, Duluth model programs often ignore serious mental health and substance abuse issues present in perpetrators. These and other issues of possible threat to mental health professional ethics are reviewed in light of the court-mandated, compulsory nature of most Duluth model (...)
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  6.  20
    Steven F. Bucky (ed.) (2009). Ethical and Legal Issues for Mental Health Professionals: In Forensic Settings. Brunner-Routledge.
    This unique text is organized around the most current ethical and legal standards as defined by the mental health professionals of psychology, social work, ...
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  7. Steven F. Bucky, Joanne E. Callan & George Stricker (eds.) (2005). Ethical and Legal Issues for Mental Health Professionals: A Comprehensive Handbook of Principles and Standards. Haworth Maltreatment&Trauma Press.
  8.  12
    W. Brad Johnson & Gerald P. Koocher (eds.) (2011). Ethical Conundrums, Quandaries, and Predicaments in Mental Health Practice: A Casebook From the Files of Experts. Oxford University Press.
    Is it ethical to treat a death row inmate only to stabilize him or her for eventual execution? What happens when a military provider receives highly sensitive intelligence from a client?
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  9.  32
    Philip J. Barker (ed.) (2011). Mental Health Ethics: The Human Context. Routledge.
    This work provides an overview of traditional and contemporary ethical perspectives and critically examines a range of ethical and moral challenges present in ...
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  10. William F. Doverspike (1999). Ethical Risk Management: Guidelines for Practice. Professional Resource Press.
  11.  14
    Wai-Ching Leung (2002). Why the Professional-Client Ethic is Inadequate in Mental Health Care. Nursing Ethics 9 (1):51-60.
    Patients who are subject to compulsory care constitute a substantial proportion of the work-load of mental health professionals, particularly psychiatric nurses. This article examines the traditional ‘beneficence-autonomy’ approach to ethics in compulsory psychiatric care and evaluates it against the reality of daily practice. Risk to the public has always been an important but often unacknowledged consideration. Inequalities exist among ethnic and socio-economic groups and there is a lack of agreement on what constitutes mental disorder. Two major (...)
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  12.  7
    Laura Sánchez Valdés, Isaac Prilleltensky, Richard Walsh-Bowers & Amy Rossiter (2002). Applied Ethics in Mental Health in Cuba: Part I--Guiding Concepts and Values. Ethics and Behavior 12 (3):223 – 242.
    As part of a project on professionals' lived experience of ethics, this article explores the guiding concepts and values concerning ethics of mental health professionals in Cuba. The data, obtained through individual interviews and focus groups with 28 professionals, indicate that Cubans conceptualize applied ethics in terms of its central role in professional practice and its connection to the social context and subjective processes. Findings also show that Cuban professionals are guided not only by (...)
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  13.  5
    Isaac Prilleltensky, Laura Sánchez Valdés, Amy Rossiter & Richard Walsh-Bowers (2002). Applied Ethics in Mental Health in Cuba: Part II-Power Differentials, Dilemmas, Resources, and Limitations. Ethics and Behavior 12 (3):243 – 260.
    This article is the second one in a series dealing with mental health ethics in Cuba. It reports on ethical dilemmas, resources and limitations to their resolution, and recommendations for action. The data, obtained through individual interviews and focus groups with 28 professionals, indicate that Cubans experience dilemmas related to (a) the interests of clients, (b) their personal interests, and (c) the interest of the state. These conflicts are related to power differentials among (a) clients and professionals, (...)
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  14.  2
    Marit H. Hem, Bert Molewijk & Reidar Pedersen (2014). Ethical Challenges in Connection with the Use of Coercion: A Focus Group Study of Health Care Personnel in Mental Health Care. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):82.
    In recent years, the attention on the use of coercion in mental health care has increased. The use of coercion is common and controversial, and involves many complex ethical challenges. The research question in this study was: What kind of ethical challenges related to the use of coercion do health care practitioners face in their daily clinical work?
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  15.  57
    Gerald P. Koocher (2008). Ethics in Psychology and the Mental Health Professions: Standards and Cases. Oxford University Press.
    Psychologists today must deal with a broad range of ethical issues--from charging fees to maintaining a client's confidentiality, and from conducting research to respecting clients, colleagues, and students. As the field of psychology has grown in size and scope, the role of ethics has become more important and complex whether the psychologist is involved in teaching, counseling, research, or practice. Now this most widely read and cited ethics text in psychology has been revised to reflect the ethics (...)
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  16.  6
    Karolyn L. A. White, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Ian Kerridge (2014). Contextualising Professional Ethics: The Impact of the Prison Context on the Practices and Norms of Health Care Practitioners. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):333-345.
    Health care is provided in many contexts—not just hospitals, clinics, and community health settings. Different institutional settings may significantly influence the design and delivery of health care and the ethical obligations and practices of health care practitioners working within them. This is particularly true in institutions that are established to constrain freedom, ensure security and authority, and restrict movement and choice. We describe the results of a qualitative study of the experiences of doctors and nurses working (...)
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  17.  3
    Arthur Robin Williams (2015). Opportunities in Reform: Bioethics and Mental Health Ethics. Bioethics 30 (2):n/a-n/a.
    Last year marks the first year of implementation for both the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act in the United States. As a result, healthcare reform is moving in the direction of integrating care for physical and mental illness, nudging clinicians to consider medical and psychiatric comorbidity as the expectation rather than the exception. Understanding the intersections of physical and mental illness with autonomy and self-determination in a (...)
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  18.  8
    Nathan Carlin, Cathy Rozmus, Jeffrey Spike, Irmgard Willcockson, William Seifert, Cynthia Chappell, Pei-Hsuan Hsieh, Thomas Cole, Catherine Flaitz, Joan Engebretson, Rebecca Lunstroth, Charles Amos & Bryant Boutwell (2011). The Health Professional Ethics Rubric: Practical Assessment in Ethics Education for Health Professional Schools. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (4):277-290.
    A barrier to the development and refinement of ethics education in and across health professional schools is that there is not an agreed upon instrument or method for assessment in ethics education. The most widely used ethics education assessment instrument is the Defining Issues Test (DIT) I & II. This instrument is not specific to the health professions. But it has been modified for use in, and influenced the development of other instruments in, the (...)
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  19. Adarsh Tripathi & Jitendra Kumar Trivedi, Mental Health in South Asia: Ethics, Resources, Programs and Legislation.
    Private Sector Psychiatry has a lot to offer in the region of South Asia. South Asia is a densely populated region with disproportionate skilled personnel for Mental Health and a scarcity of government resources to manage the Mental Health issues of the populace. There are some countries in this region which have Mental Health Legislation and National Mental Health Programs, and some who have no separate Mental Health laws, guidelines (...)
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  20.  17
    Michael Parker (ed.) (1999). Ethics and Community in the Health Care Professions. Routledge.
    This volume explores the focus of interest in community and the emerging theoretical opposition between communitarianism and liberalism, including the practical, theoretical and ethical issues that relate to community in the healthcare professions.
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  21.  10
    James R. Alleman (2001). Personal, Practical, and Professional Issues in Providing Managed Mental Health Care: A Discussion for New Psychotherapists. Ethics and Behavior 11 (4):413 – 429.
    Written by a former corporate manager pursuing counseling as a 2nd career, this article offers pointed views on managed mental health care. Values of practitioners that are a mismatch for managed care are noted, and more specific disadvantages and advantages are examined. Loss of client confidentiality is addressed and procedures and technologies for its reclamation are noted. Negative effects on therapy are acknowledged and potential for better accountability and research are pointed out. Economic disadvantages of a small provider's (...)
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  22.  3
    David Faust (1993). Use and Then Prove, or Prove and Then Use? Some Thoughts on the Ethics of Mental Health Professionals' Courtroom Involvement. Ethics and Behavior 3 (3 & 4):359 – 380.
    Psychologists' courtroom involvement and testimony should not be dictated solely by what the judge or court allows but also require the application of personal or professional standards. This article explores various standards that might be used to determine whether psychological evidence is ready for courtroom application, whether or which evaluative procedures should be performed prior to courtroom use, and the potential tensions between personal validation or impression and formal scientific evidence. Although determining just how tough our professional standards (...)
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  23.  6
    James L. Werth Jr (1999). When is a Mental Health Professional Competent to Assess a Person's Decision to Hasten Death? Ethics and Behavior 9 (2):141 – 157.
  24.  3
    James L. Werth Jr (1999). When is a Mental Health Professional Competent to Assess a Person's Decision to Hasten Death? Ethics and Behavior 9 (2):141 – 157.
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  25.  1
    Richard J. Bonnie (1988). Professional Liability and the Qyality of Mental Health Care. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 16 (3-4):229-239.
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  26.  3
    Stanley L. Brodsky & Virginia A. Galloway (2003). Ethical and Professional Demands for Forensic Mental Health Professionals in the Post-Atkins Era. Ethics and Behavior 13 (1):3 – 9.
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  27. Richard J. Bonnie (1988). Professional Liability and the Qyality of Mental Health Care. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 16 (3-4):229-239.
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  28.  1
    Judi L. Malone (2012). Professional Ethics in Context. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (4):463-477.
    The complexities of professional ethics are best understood and interpreted within their sociohistorical context. This paper focuses on the experience of 20 rural psychologists from across Canada, a context rife with demographic and practice characteristics that may instigate ethical issues. Employing hermeneutic phenomenology, these qualitative research results are indicative of professional struggles that impacted the participants’ experience of professional ethics and raised key questions about policy and practise. Concerns regarding competition highlight potential professional vulnerability, (...)
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  29. Sarah Banks (2009). Ethics in Professional Life: Virtues for Health and Social Care. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The domain of professional ethics -- Virtue, ethics, and professional life -- Virtues, vices, and situations -- Professional wisdom -- Care -- Respectfulness -- Trustworthiness -- Justice -- Courage -- Integrity.
     
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  30.  34
    H. Nico Plomp (2013). The Contribution of Health Professionals to the Creation of Occupational Health Standards: The Impact of Professional Ethics in the Case of Asbestos. Public Health Ethics 6 (1):73-89.
    ln the Netherlands, as in other Western countries, there is a great time lag between the evidence of the carcinogenicity of asbestos (1949) and the launching of first legislation that reduces the occupational exposure (1971) and finally, the complete ban of the production and application of asbestos (1993). So, between 1949 and 1970 there was a serious health risk while effective protective regulations were lacking. This implied a serious ethical dilemma for occupational health professionals: according to their code (...)
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  31.  13
    David A. Pollack, Bentson H. McFarland, Robert A. George & Richard H. Angell (1993). Ethics and Value Strategies Used in Prioritizing Mental Health Services in Oregon. HEC Forum 5 (5):322-339.
    The authors describe the ethical considerations underlying the inclusion of mental health services into a prioritizedhealth care system. The Oregon Health Plan is a process for defining and delivering basic health services to an entire state. As the plan was developed, the mental health community needed to decide whether or not to participate in the process and, if so, how. Lengthy discussions among mental health consumers, family members, and providers led to a (...)
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  32.  9
    Carly Ruderman, C. Tracy, Cécile Bensimon, Mark Bernstein, Laura Hawryluck, Randi Zlotnik Shaul & Ross Upshur (2006). On Pandemics and the Duty to Care: Whose Duty? Who Cares? [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-6.
    Background As a number of commentators have noted, SARS exposed the vulnerabilities of our health care systems and governance structures. Health care professionals (HCPs) and hospital systems that bore the brunt of the SARS outbreak continue to struggle with the aftermath of the crisis. Indeed, HCPs – both in clinical care and in public health – were severely tested by SARS. Unprecedented demands were placed on their skills and expertise, and their personal commitment to their profession was (...)
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  33.  5
    Lynn Gillam, Clare Delany, Marilys Guillemin & Sally Warmington (2014). The Role of Emotions in Health Professional Ethics Teaching. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (5):331-335.
    In this paper, we put forward the view that emotions have a legitimate and important role in health professional ethics education. This paper draws upon our experience of running a narrative ethics education programme for ethics educators from a range of healthcare disciplines. It describes the way in which emotions may be elicited in narrative ethics teaching and considers the appropriate role of emotions in ethics education for health professionals. We argue there (...)
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  34.  20
    Jinger G. Hoop, Tony DiPasquale, Juan M. Hernandez & Laura Weiss Roberts (2008). Ethics and Culture in Mental Health Care. Ethics and Behavior 18 (4):353 – 372.
    This article examines the complex relationship between culture, values, and ethics in mental health care. Cultural competence is a practical, concrete demonstration of the ethical principles of respect for persons, beneficence (doing good), nonmaleficence (not doing harm), and justice (treating people fairly)—the cornerstones of modern ethical codes for the health professions. Five clinical cases are presented to illustrate the range of ethical issues faced by mental health clinicians working in a multicultural environment, including issues (...)
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  35.  3
    Ronald Pies (2008). Review of "Ethics in Mental Health Research" by James M. DuBois. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):11-.
    The burgeoning field of medical ethics raises complicated questions for mental health researchers. The critical issues of risk assessment, beneficence, and the moral duties researchers owe their patients are analyzed in James DuBois's well written Ethics in Mental Health Research.
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  36.  1
    Larry Gottlieb (2000). Ethics Committees in Community Mental Health Settings? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (4):566-567.
    I am in the process of trying to organize an ethics committee at a large community mental health center in Central Massachusetts and am seeking advice from anyone with experience in this or a similar milieu. The agency is a large (almost 700 employees), nonprofit, community-based program that operates under the auspices of a broad, academically affiliated, behavioral health system. An independent board of trustees, responsible to the parent organization governs the agency. The agency primarily provides (...)
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  37.  42
    Bertram Bandman (2003). The Moral Development of Health Care Professionals: Rational Decisionmaking in Health Care Ethics. Praeger.
    A central challenge motivates this work: How, if at all, can philosophical ethics help in the moral development of health professionals?
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  38.  3
    Sandrine Berges (2012). Virtue as Mental Health: A Platonic Defence of the Medical Model in Ethics. Journal of Ancient Philosophy 6 (1).
    I argue that Plato holds a medical model of virtue as health which does not have themorally unacceptable implications which have led some to describe it as authoritarian.This model, which draws on the educational virtues of the elenchos, lacks anyimplication that all criminals are mad or all mad people criminals – this implication beingat the source of many criticisms of Plato’s analogy of virtue and health. After setting upthe analogy and the model, I defend my argument against two (...)
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  39. Stanley Joel Reiser (ed.) (1987). Divided Staffs, Divided Selves: A Case Approach to Mental Health Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Divided Staffs, Divided Selves offers a case-centered approach to the teaching of health care ethics to a wide range of students and clinicians. The book provides both clinical case material and a method for engaging in a dialogue regarding difficult decisions in the mental health care field that have potentially tragic choices. The essays that introduce the volume place the ethical problems of treating mentally ill people in the context of the health care ethics (...)
     
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  40. H. Krahn (2009). Building a Mental Health Ethics Film Series, Building Mental Health Ethics Literacy. Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 4 (1):1-6.
     
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  41. Barbara Russell (2008). Geriatric Mental Health Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 3:1-2.
     
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  42. Holly A. Taylor & Benjamin S. Wilfond (2013). Managing Disclosure of Research Misconduct by a Graduate Student to a University Mental Health Professional During a Clinical Counseling Session. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):68 - 68.
    This case looks at the question of how to consider obligations of confidentiality by a mental health professional who works for an institution and learns that a student has been using a drug intended for an animal research project. Dr. Paul Appelbaum, MD, a psychiatrist at Columbia University, examines the issue of the limits of confidentiality. Nicholas Steneck, PhD, a scholar in research misconduct at the University of Michigan, explores the obligations to report research misconduct. Walter Limehouse, (...)
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  43.  7
    N. D. Berkman (2004). Gaps, Conflicts, and Consensus in the Ethics Statements of Professional Associations, Medical Groups, and Health Plans. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (4):395-401.
    Background: Patients today interact with physicians, physician groups, and health plans, each of which may follow distinct ethical guidelines.Method: We systematically compared physician codes of ethics with ethics policies at physician group practices and health plans, using the 1998–99 policies of 38 organisations—18 medical associations , nine physician group practices , and 12 health plans —selected using random and stratified purposive sampling. A clinician and a social scientist independently abstracted each document, using a 397-item (...) care ethics taxonomy; a reconciled abstraction form was used for analysis. This study focuses on ethics policies regarding professional obligation towards patients, resource allocation, and care for the vulnerable in society.Results: A majority in all three groups mention “fiduciary obligations” of one sort or another, but associations generally address physician/patient relations but not health plan obligations, while plans rarely endorse physicians’ obligations of advocacy, beneficence, and non-maleficence. Except for occasional mentions of cost effectiveness or efficiency, ethical considerations in resource allocation rarely arise in the ethics policies of all three organisational types. Very few associations, groups, or plans specifically endorse obligations to vulnerable populations.Conclusions: With some important exceptions, we found that the ethics policies of associations, groups, and plans are narrowly focused and often ignore important ethical concerns for society, such as resource allocation and care for vulnerable populations. More collaborative work is needed to build integrated sets of ethical standards that address the aims and responsibilities of the major stakeholders in health care delivery. (shrink)
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  44. D. Ambrosini, A. G. Crocker, M. Perreault & M. Israël (2008). Perceptions of Psychiatric Advance Directives Among Legal and Mental Health Professionals in Ontario and Quebec. Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 3 (2):1-12.
    In an exploratory context, a qualitative approach was used to document perceptions of psychiatric advance directives among legal professionals and mental health professionals in Ontario and Quebec. A Web survey was administered and a qualitative analysis approach was used to explore attitudes towards PADs. It was found that legal and mental health professionals hold dif erent values related to clinical, ethical and legal issues, which may be related to their professional training. Among the advantages associated (...)
     
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  45.  1
    P. J. Surkan, G. Steineck & U. Kreicbergs (2008). Perceptions of a Mental Health Questionnaire: The Ethics of Using Population-Based Controls. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (7):545-547.
    Mental health surveys are used extensively in epidemiological research worldwide. The ethical questions that arise regarding their risk of causing psychological distress or other potential harm have not been studied in the general population. We have investigated how study participants serving as controls in a population-based study perceived an anonymous postal questionnaire focusing on mental health and wellbeing. Parents were contacted from the Swedish Census Bureau as part of a larger follow-up study on palliative care conducted (...)
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  46. P. J. Surkan, Gunnar Steineck & Ulrika Kreicbergs (2008). Perceptions of a Mental Health Questionnaire: The Ethics of Using Population-Based Controls. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (7):545-547.
    Mental health surveys are used extensively in epidemiological research worldwide. The ethical questions that arise regarding their risk of causing psychological distress or other potential harm have not been studied in the general population. We have investigated how study participants serving as controls in a population-based study perceived an anonymous postal questionnaire focusing on mental health and wellbeing. Parents were contacted from the Swedish Census Bureau as part of a larger follow-up study on palliative care conducted (...)
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  47.  41
    LeClair Bissell (1994). Ethics for Addiction Professionals. Hazelden.
    This trailblazing book provides a comprehensive view of the ethical issues that cut across the addiction field, from Employee Assistance Programs to treatment and aftercare. By addressing probing questions that illuminate today's complex ethical landscape, LeClair Bissell and James Royce explore how standard guidelines for professional conduct benefit counselors and clients alike.
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  48.  16
    Neil Arya & Joanna Santa Barbara (eds.) (2008). Peace Through Health: How Health Professionals Can Work for a Less Violent World. Kumarian Press.
    Those considering careers in medicine and other health and humanitarian disciplines as well as those concerned about the growing presence of militarized ...
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  49.  4
    Robert Henley Woody (2011). Science in Mental Health Training and Practice, With Special Reference to School Psychology. Ethics and Behavior 21 (1):69-77.
    The first words in the inaugural version of the American Psychological Association Ethical Standards of Psychologists (1953) declared, ?Psychology is a science? (p. v). Professional ethics for all of the mental health disciplines support science (and objectivity) for knowledge and practice. Using school psychology as an example, consideration is given to the presence of science and research in the scientist-practitioner, professional practitioner, and psychoeducational training and practice models. Although none of the three models truly ignores (...)
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  50.  7
    Robert Henley Woody (1997). Dubious and Bogus Credentials in Mental Health Practice. Ethics and Behavior 7 (4):337 – 345.
    Within an ethics framework, this article explores mental health practitioners' use of credentials that lack acceptable accreditation or authority. Increased competition among mental health care providers has elevated the importance of credentials for marketing professional services. Practitioners worried about economic survival, along with certain personality characteristics (e.g., sheer ego), are tempted to rely on credentials that lack proof of quality, thereby potentially jeopardizing professionalism. Specific assertions and recommendations are set forth in the interest of (...)
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