Search results for 'Merle A. Williams' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David M. Williams, Robert W. Scotland, Christopher J. Humphries & Darrell J. Siebert (1996). Confusion in Philosophy: A Comment on Williams (1992). Synthese 108 (1):127 - 136.score: 1500.0
    Patricia Williams made a number of claims concerning the methods and practise of cladistic analysis and classification. Her argument rests upon the distinction of two kinds of hierarchy: a divisional hierarchy depicting evolutionary descent and the Linnean hierarchy describing taxonomic groups in a classification. Williams goes on to outline five problems with cladistics that lead her to the conclusion that systematists should eliminate cladism as a school of biological taxonomy and to replace it either with something that is (...)
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  2. A. Dee Williams (forthcoming). A. Dee Williams 71. Journal of Thought.score: 1440.0
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  3. Anne Williams (2010). Selecting Barrenness - A Response From Anne Williams. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (1):29-31.score: 1320.0
    A response to Kavita Shah's article Selecting Barrenness.
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  4. Reiss A. (2009). Brain Basis of Empathy in “Hypersocial” Williams Syndrome Individuals - A Meta-Analytical Approach &Ndash. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 1260.0
  5. John A. (2009). Longitudinal Assessment of Receptive Vocabulary in Children and Adolescents with Williams Syndrome: A Multilevel Modeling Analysis. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 1260.0
  6. Duncan Ryfiken Williams (2000). 2000 Representations of Zen: A Social and Institutional History of Soto Zen Buddhism in Edo Japan. Ph. D. Dissertation, Harvard University. Duncan Ryiken Williams Trinity College. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 28:1-2.score: 1260.0
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  7. Patricia J. Williams (1998). Seeing a Cohr-Blind Future: The Paradox of Race (New York: Farrar, Straus and GiroUX, 1997); Robert Gooding-Williams," Race. Multiculturalism, and Democracy,". Constellations 5:i8 - 41.score: 1260.0
     
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  8. Merle A. Williams (1993). Henry James and the Philosophical Novel: Being and Seeing. Cambridge University Press.score: 1050.0
    Henry James and the Philosophical Novel breaks fresh ground by examining James's unique position as a philosophical novelist, closely associated with the climate of ideas generated by his brother William. It considers storytelling as a mode of philosophical enquiry, showing how a range of distinguished thinkers have relied on fictional narrative as a technique for formulating and clarifying their ideas; and investigates (with close reference to his novels) the affiliations between James's practice as a novelist and contemporary epistemological, moral, and (...)
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  9. John R. Williams (2007). Globalization and Catholic Social Thought: Present Crisis, Future Hope. Edited by John A. Coleman and William F. Ryan. Heythrop Journal 48 (2):338–340.score: 660.0
  10. Thomas Williams (1998). William A. Frank and Allan B. Wolter, Duns Scotus, Metaphysician. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 43 (2):125-127.score: 660.0
  11. Bernard Williams (2000). Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline. Philosophy 75 (4):477-496.score: 600.0
    What can--and what can't--philosophy do? What are its ethical risks--and its possible rewards? How does it differ from science? In Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline , Bernard Williams addresses these questions and presents a striking vision of philosophy as fundamentally different from science in its aims and methods even though there is still in philosophy "something that counts as getting it right." Written with his distinctive combination of rigor, imagination, depth, and humanism, the book amply demonstrates why Williams (...)
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  12. John N. Williams (2013). The Completeness of the Pragmatic Solution to Moore's Paradox in Belief: A Reply to Chan. Synthese 190 (12):2457-2476.score: 400.0
    Moore’s paradox in belief is the fact that beliefs of the form ‘ p and I do not believe that p ’ are ‘absurd’ yet possibly true. Writers on the paradox have nearly all taken the absurdity to be a form of irrationality. These include those who give what Timothy Chan calls the ‘pragmatic solution’ to the paradox. This solution turns on the fact that having the Moorean belief falsifies its content. Chan, who also takes the absurdity to be a (...)
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  13. M. Dixon-Woods, SJ Williams, CJ Jackson, A. Akkad, S. Kenyon & M. Habiba (2006). Why Women Consent to Surgery, Even When They Don't Want To: A Qualitative Study. Clinical Ethics 1 (3):153-158.score: 400.0
    Although there has been critical analysis of how the informed consent process functions in relation to participation in research and particular ethical 'dilemmas', there has been little examination of consenting to more routine medical procedures. We report a qualitative study of 25 women who consented to surgery. Of these, nine were ambivalent or opposed to having an operation. When faced with a consent form, women's accounts suggest that they rarely do anything other than obey professionals' requests for a signature. An (...)
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  14. Reginald Williams (2008). Gender, Evil, and God: A Dialogue. Think 6 (16):93-99.score: 400.0
    Reginald Williams offers a novel approach to the problem of evil.
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  15. Robyn Williams (2013). Why 41 Years of Science Broadcasting Makes Me a Humanist on Stilts. Australian Humanist, The 111 (111):3.score: 400.0
    Williams, Robyn I was briefly a religious person - only on a form. When we crossed into Pakistan, having hitch-hiked from London en route to Sydney in 1966, there came a point where you could not just put a line through where it said 'religion'. I suddenly discovered what to do. I wrote 'Congregationalist hedonist'. All the officials loved it. We had lots of fun together.
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  16. V. M. Marsh, D. M. Kamuya, A. M. Mlamba, T. N. Williams & S. S. Molyneux (2009). Experiences with Community Engagement and Informed Consent in a Genetic Cohort Study of Severe Childhood Diseases in Kenya. BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):13-13.score: 400.0
    BackgroundThe potential contribution of community engagement to addressing ethical challenges for international biomedical research is well described, but there is relatively little documented experience of community engagement to inform its development in practice. This paper draws on experiences around community engagement and informed consent during a genetic cohort study in Kenya to contribute to understanding the strengths and challenges of community engagement in supporting ethical research practice, focusing on issues of communication, the role of field workers in 'doing ethics' on (...)
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  17. Michael Williams (1977/1999). Groundless Belief: An Essay on the Possibility of Epistemology: With a New Preface and Afterword. Princeton University Press.score: 400.0
    Inspired by the work of Wilfrid Sellars, Michael Williams launches an all-out attack on what he calls "phenomenalism," the idea that our knowledge of the world rests on a perceptual or experiential foundation. The point of this wider-than-normal usage of the term "phenomenalism," according to which even some forms of direct realism deserve to be called phenomenalistic, is to call attention to important continuities of thought between theories often thought to be competitors. Williams's target is not phenomenalism in (...)
     
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  18. Thomas D. Williams (2008). Knowing Right From Wrong: A Christian Guide to Conscience. Faith Words.score: 400.0
    Father Williams explains how the conscience is formed through our training and experiences and informed by the Holy Spirit, making it an essential tool for daily living. He uses familiar and surprising characters to illustrate the positive choices conscience can direct--and the disaster that results when a conscience is undeveloped or ignored. Questions he tackles include "Is it more important to be smart or good?""Is there a morally right thing to do in every situation?" and "Is the Christian moral (...)
     
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  19. Michael Williams (2001). Problems of Knowledge: A Critical Introduction to Epistemology. OUP Oxford.score: 400.0
    What is epistemology or 'the theory of knowledge'? What is it really about? Why does it matter? What makes theorising about knowledge 'philosophical'? Why do some philosophers argue that epistemology - perhaps even philosophy itself - is dead? In this exciting and original introduction, Michael Williams shows how epistemological theorizing is sensitive to a range of questions about the nature, limits, methods, and value of knowing. He pays special attention to the challenge of philosophical scepticism: does our 'knowledge' rest (...)
     
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  20. Patricia A. Williams (2001). The Problem of Evil: A Solution From Science. Zygon 36 (3):563-574.score: 360.0
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  21. B. A. O. Williams (1958). The Revolution in Philosophy. By A. J. Ayer and Others; Introduction by Gilbert Ryle. (London: Macmillan & Co. Ltd. 1956. P. 126. Price 10s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 33 (124):65-.score: 360.0
  22. C. Johnston, C. Williams, C. Dias, A. Lapraik, L. Marvdashti & C. Norcross (2012). Setting Up a Student Clinical Ethics Committee. Clinical Ethics 7 (2):51-53.score: 360.0
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  23. Patricia A. Williams (1996). Christianity and Evolutionary Ethics: Sketch Toward a Reconciliation. Zygon 31 (2):253-268.score: 360.0
  24. Carolyn B. Mervis Angela E. John, Lauren A. Dobson, Lauren E. Thomas (2012). Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome: A Longitudinal Examination. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 162.0
    Although prior research has indicated that pragmatics is an area of particular weakness for individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), the relations among different pragmatic abilities and the relations between pragmatic ability and expressive vocabulary ability have yet to be addressed. In addition, analyses of the relations between the same type of pragmatic ability over time have not been reported. The present study was designed to address these questions. We considered the pragmatic language abilities of 14 children with WS at (...)
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  25. Lauren Freeman (2010). Metontology , Moral Particularism, and the “Art of Existing:” A Dialogue Between Heidegger, Aristotle, and Bernard Williams. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):545-568.score: 156.0
    An important shift occurs in Martin Heidegger’s thinking one year after the publication of Being and Time , in the Appendix to the Metaphysical Foundations of Logic . The shift is from his project of fundamental ontology—which provides an existential analysis of human existence on an ontological level—to metontology . Metontology is a neologism that refers to the ontic sphere of human experience and to the regional ontologies that were excluded from Being and Time. It is within metontology, Heidegger states, (...)
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  26. Alex Voorhoeve (2004). A Mistrustful Animal: Bernard Williams Interviewed. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 12 (1):81-92.score: 156.0
    A discussion with Bernard Williams about main themes in his work. (Note: a version of this interview appears in 'Conversations on Ethics' (OUP, 2009).).
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  27. Christine James (2009). Language and Emotional Knowledge: A Case Study on Ability and Disability in Williams Syndrome. Biosemiotics 2 (2):151-167.score: 156.0
    Williams Syndrome provides a striking test case for discourses on disability, because the characteristics associated with Williams Syndrome involve a combination of “abilities” and “disabilities”. For example, Williams Syndrome is associated with disabilities in mathematics and spatial cognition. However, Williams Syndrome individuals also tend to have a unique strength in their expressive language skills, and are socially outgoing and unselfconscious when meeting new people. Children with Williams are said to be typically unafraid of strangers and (...)
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  28. Fred Ribkoff & Paul Tyndall (2011). On the Dialectics of Trauma in Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire. Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):325-337.score: 156.0
    Blanche DuBois, the tragic heroine of Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire , has always been read as either “mad” from the start of the play or as a character who descends into “madness.” We argue that Streetcar adumbrates elements of trauma theory, specifically symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder such as involuntary reliving of traumatic events, dissociation, guilt, shame, denial, the shattering of the self, the compulsion to repeat the story of trauma, as well as the early stages of (...)
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  29. D. E. Miller (2014). Reactive Attitudes and the Hare-Williams Debate: Towards a New Consequentialist Moral Psychology. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (254):39-59.score: 156.0
    Bernard Williams charges that the moral psychology built into R. M. Hare’s utilitarianism is incoherent in virtue of demanding a bifurcated kind of moral thinking that is possible only for agents who fail to reflect properly on their own practical decision making. I mount a qualified defence of Hare’s view by drawing on the account of the ‘reactive attitudes’ found in P. F. Strawson’s ‘Freedom and Resentment’. Against Williams, I argue that the ‘resilience’ of the reactive attitudes ensures (...)
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  30. Hilary Putnam (2001). Reply to Bernard Williams' ‘Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline’. Philosophy 76 (4):605-614.score: 144.0
    In ‘Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline,’ Williams is mistaken in thinking that I accused him of thinking that that we can describe the world ‘as it is anyway’ without using concepts. Our real disagreement is over whether it makes sense to think that the concepts of physics do this. The central issue is this: the notion of ‘absoluteness’ is defined using at least one semantical notion (‘convergence’). If Williams' view is to work, I argue, at least one semantical (...)
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  31. Jack Reynolds (2008). Transcendental Priority and Deleuzian Normativity. A Reply to James Williams. Deleuze Studies 2 (1):101-108.score: 144.0
    I am grateful that someone whose work I greatly admire could be the philosopher to so eloquently and succinctly cut to the heart of the problem that I posed in the previous issue of Deleuze Studies. James Williams' critical reply leaves me, prima facie, confronted by a stark alternative: either I have misunderstood Deleuze, or I have illustrated problems and lacunae in Deleuze. I will suggest, however, that this is a false alternative, and that Williams' and my divergent (...)
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  32. J. P. Moreland (1998). Locke's Parity Thesis About Thinking Matter: A Response to Williams. Religious Studies 34 (3):253-259.score: 144.0
    Recently, Clifford Williams has attempted to argue for the plausibility of a Christian form of physicalism. To make his case, Williams appropriates certain claims by John Locke regarding the possibility of thinking matter to argue for what Williams calls the parity theses: (1) God can make matter and nonmatter either to think or not to think. Given God's omnipotence, the justification for (1) is: (2) there is no contradiction in asserting either that matter or nonmatter thinks or (...)
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  33. Marc Ereshefsky (1988). Axiomatics and Individuality: A Reply to Williams' "Species Are Individuals". Philosophy of Science 55 (3):427-434.score: 144.0
    In her "Species Are Individuals" (1985), Mary Williams offers informal arguments and a sketched proof which allegedly show that species are individuals with respect to evolutionary theory. In this paper, I suggest that her informal arguments are insufficient for showing that clans are not sets and that species are individuals. I also argue that her sketched proof depends on three questionable assumptions.
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  34. J. P. Moreland (2001). Topic Neutrality and the Parity Thesis: A Surrejoinder to Williams. Religious Studies 37 (1):93-101.score: 144.0
    In an important paper, Clifford Williams advanced a Lockean-style argument to justify the parity thesis, viz., that there is no intellectual advantage to Christian physicalism or Christian dualism. In an article in Religious Studies I offered a critique of Williams's parity thesis and he has published a rejoinder to me in the same journal centring on my rejection of topic neutrality as an appropriate way to set up the mind–body debate. In this surrejoinder to Williams, I present (...)
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  35. Tristan Guillermo Torriani (2010). Perspectivism and Intersubjective Criteria for Personal Identity: A Defense of Bernard Williams' Criterion of Bodily Continuity. Princípios 15 (23):153-190.score: 144.0
    In this article I revisit earlier stages of the discussion of personal identity, before Neo-Lockean psychological continuity views became prevalent. In particular, I am interested in Bernard Williams’ initial proposal of bodily identity as a necessary, although not sufficient, criterion of personal identity. It was at this point that psychological continuity views came to the fore arguing that bodily identity was not necessary because brain transplants were logically possible, even if physically impossible. Further proposals by Shoemaker of causal relations (...)
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  36. O. R. Jones (1970). On Truth-A Reply To C J F Williams. Analysis 31 (October):24-29.score: 144.0
    It is argued that "a's statement, That x is eligible, Is true" says, And not merely presupposes as williams holds, That x is eligible. A brief summary is given of williams' analysis of what is said about a statement when it is said to be true. An attempt is made to show that the predicable in williams' definition is anomalous by contrasting it with genuine conjunctive predicables. Finally, It is suggested that williams' predicable, Even if suitably (...)
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  37. Matt Sleat (2010). Bernard Williams and the Possibility of a Realist Political Theory. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (4):485-503.score: 144.0
    This article explores the prospects for developing a realist political theory via an analysis of the work of Bernard Williams. It begins by setting out Williams’s theory of political realism and placing it in the wider context of a realist challenge in the literature that rightly identifies several deficiencies in the liberal view of politics and legitimacy. The central argument of the article is, however, that Williams’s political realism shares common features with liberal theory, including familiar normative (...)
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  38. Alastair Blanshard (2003). Amor Graecus —or Romanus ? C. A. Williams: Roman Homosexuality. Ideologies of Masculinity in Classical Antiquity . Pp. XII + 395, Pls. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. Cases, £40. Isbn: 0-19-511300-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (02):468-.score: 140.0
  39. Neil Coffee (2014). (C.A.) Williams Reading Roman Friendship. Pp. X + 378, Ills. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Cased, £65, US$110. ISBN: 978-1-107-00365-1. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 64 (1):117-119.score: 140.0
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  40. Kelly Olson (2013). C.A. Williams Roman Homosexuality. Second Edition. Pp. Xx + 471, Pls. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010 (First Edition 1999). Paper, £19.99, US$29.95. ISBN: 978-0-19-538874-9. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (1):304-305.score: 140.0
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  41. K. Rutter (2007). Meadows (A.), Williams (R.) (Edd.) Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum. Volume XIII. The Collection of the Society of Antiquaries, Newcastle Upon Tyne. Pp. 112, Pls. Oxford: Oxford University Press/London: Spink and Son, for the British Academy, 2005. Cased, £50. ISBN: 978-0-19-726310-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (01):251-.score: 140.0
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  42. Ruth V. Aguilera (2010). Deborah E. Rupp Cynthia A. Williams. In Marshall Schminke (ed.), Managerial Ethics: Managing the Psychology of Morality. Routledge. 69.score: 140.0
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  43. J. Elster (1982). Sour Grapes–Utilitarianism and the Genesis of Wants. Sen A, Williams B. In Amartya Kumar Sen & Bernard Arthur Owen Williams (eds.), Utilitarianism and Beyond. Cambridge University Press. 219--238.score: 140.0
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  44. Charles Sayward (1972). True Propositions: A Reply to C.J.F. Williams. Analysis 32 (3):101-106.score: 138.0
    This paper replies to points Williams makes to his reply to Sayward’s criticism of Williams’s proposal of ‘for some p ___ states that p & p’ as an analysis of ‘___ is true’.
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  45. Erik C. Banks (2013). Williams James' Direct Realism: A Reconstruction. History of Philosophy Quarterly 30 (3):271-291.score: 136.0
    William James' Radical Empiricist essays offer a unique and powerful argument for direct realism about our perceptions of objects. This theory can be completed with some observations by Kant on the intellectual preconditions for a perceptual judgment. Finally James and Kant deliver a powerful blow to the representational theory of perception and knowledge, which applies quite broadly to theories of representation generally.
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  46. Miriam D. Lense, Carolyn M. Shivers & Elisabeth M. Dykens (2013). (A)Musicality in Williams Syndrome: Examining Relationships Among Auditory Perception, Musical Skill, and Emotional Responsiveness to Music. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 132.0
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  47. A. W. Moore (2013). Gilles Deleuze's Philosophy of Time: A Critical Introduction and Guide – By James Williams. [REVIEW] Euopean Journal of Philosophy 21 (S2):e15-e17.score: 126.0
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  48. J. J. MacIntosh (1994). Belief-in Revisited: A Reply to Williams. Religious Studies 30 (4):487 - 503.score: 126.0
    In 'Belief-In and Belief in God' ("Religious Studies", 28, 1992), J. N. Williams suggests that belief in God cannot be rational unless one has rational beliefs that God exists. While agreeing with his conclusion (though not with his statement of it), I disagree at almost every step with his method of arriving at it. In particular I suggest that Williams goes astray concerning the dual aspect of belief in, the nature of performatives, the arousal of belief states, and (...)
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  49. Roger A. Shiner (1978). Ethics, Value and Reality By Aurel Kolnai Edited by Francis Dunlop and Brian Klug. With a Foreword by Bernard Williams and David Wiggins London: Athlone Press, 1977, Xxv + 251 Pp., £9.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 53 (206):570-.score: 126.0
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  50. W. A. Camps (1961). Aeneid V R. D. Williams: P. Vergili Maronis Aeneidos Liber Quintus. Edited with a Commentary. Pp. Xxx + 219. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960. Cloth, 20s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 11 (02):131-133.score: 126.0
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