Search results for 'Meryn Stuart' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Marilou Gagnon & Meryn Stuart (2009). Manufacturing Disability: HIV, Women and the Construction of Difference. Nursing Philosophy 10 (1):42-52.score: 240.0
    In 1998, the US Supreme Court first held that asymptomatic HIV infection constituted a disability when it ruled on the case of Bragdon v. Abbott . The use of yet another label (disabled) to identify women living with HIV has been rarely (if ever) questioned. While we do value the use of this label as an anti-discriminatory strategy, we believe that there is a need to examine how language and more specifically, the use of words such as disability, (...)
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  2. Susan Stuart (2009). Alvin I. Goldman, Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology and Neuroscience of Mindreading. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 19 (2):279-282.score: 60.0
    Alvin I. Goldman, Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology and Neuroscience of Mindreading Content Type Journal Article Pages 279-282 DOI 10.1007/s11023-009-9142-x Authors Susan Stuart, University of Glasgow Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute 11 University Gardens Glasgow G12 8QQ Scotland, UK Journal Minds and Machines Online ISSN 1572-8641 Print ISSN 0924-6495 Journal Volume Volume 19 Journal Issue Volume 19, Number 2.
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  3. Diana Stuart & Michelle Woroosz (2013). Erratum To: The Myth of Efficiency: Technology and Ethics in Industrial Food Production. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):257-257.score: 60.0
    Abstract In this paper, we explore how the application of technological tools has reshaped food production systems in ways that foster large-scale outbreaks of foodborne illness. Outbreaks of foodborne illness have received increasing attention in recent years, resulting in a growing awareness of the negative impacts associated with industrial food production. These trends indicate a need to examine systemic causes of outbreaks and how they are being addressed. In this paper, we analyze outbreaks linked to ground beef and salad greens. (...)
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  4. S. N. Stuart (2012). Outstanding Humanist Achiever 2012. Australian Humanist, The 107 (107):8.score: 60.0
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  5. S. N. Stuart (2012). Freethinkers in ADB. Australian Humanist, The 107 (107):23.score: 60.0
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  6. Jennie Stuart (2012). Hands Off Not an Option! [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The (105):17.score: 60.0
    Stuart, Jennie Review(s) of: Hands off not an option! The reminiscence museum mirror of a humanistic care philosophy, by Professor Dr Hans Marcel Becker assisted by Inez van den Dobbelsteen- Becker and Topsy Ros. Eburon Academic Publishers, Delft, 2011 272 pp.
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  7. Jennie Stuart (2013). Norman Haire and the Study of Sex [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 111 (111):24.score: 60.0
    Stuart, Jennie Review(s) of: Norman Haire and the study of sex, by Diana Wyndham, Sydney University Press, 2012, (485pp., with index ISBN: 9781743320068).
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  8. Matthew Stuart (2013). Locke's Metaphysics. Oup Oxford.score: 60.0
    Matthew Stuart offers a fresh interpretation of John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding, arguing for the work's profound contribution to metaphysics. He presents new readings of Locke's accounts of personal identity and the primary/secondary quality distinction, and explores Locke's case against materialism and his philosophy of action.
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  9. Stephen Stuart (2013). On Being Certain: Believing You Are Right Even When You're Not [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 111 (111):22.score: 60.0
    Stuart, Stephen Review(s) of: On being certain: Believing you are right even when you're not, by Robert A. Burton, St Martin's Griffin, New York, 2008, (xiv + 256 pp., index, pbk, ISBN 978-0-312-54152-1).
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  10. Stephen Stuart (2012). The Gleaming Toe of David Hume. Australian Humanist, The 107 (107):14.score: 60.0
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  11. Stephen Stuart (2013). Free Will [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 110 (110):22.score: 60.0
    Stuart, Stephen Review(s) of: Free will, by Sam Harris, Free Press, New York, 2012, (83 pp., index, ISBN 978-1-4516-8340-0).
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  12. Stephen Stuart (2013). Wicked Company: Freethinkers and Friendship in Pre-Revolutionary Paris [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 111 (111):23.score: 60.0
    Stuart, Stephen Review(s) of: Wicked company: Freethinkers and friendship in pre-revolutionary Paris, by Philipp Blom, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, London, 2011, (xxii + 361 pp., index, ISBN 978-0-297-85818-8).
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  13. Sn Stuart (2013). Agnosticism: A Very Short Introduction [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 112:23.score: 60.0
    Stuart, SN Review(s) of: Agnosticism: A very short introduction, by Robin Le Poidevin Oxford University Press, 2010, (xvi + 134 pp., index, pbk, ISBN 978-0-19-957526-8).
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  14. Matthew Stuart (2003). Locke's Colors. Philosophical Review 112 (1):57-96.score: 30.0
  15. Chris Dobbyn & Susan A. J. Stuart (2003). The Self as an Embedded Agent. Minds and Machines 13 (2):187-201.score: 30.0
    In this paper we consider the concept of a self-aware agent. In cognitive science agents are seen as embodied and interactively situated in worlds. We analyse the meanings attached to these terms in cognitive science and robotics, proposing a set of conditions for situatedness and embodiment, and examine the claim that internal representational schemas are largely unnecessary for intelligent behaviour in animats. We maintain that current situated and embodied animats cannot be ascribed even minimal self-awareness, and offer a six point (...)
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  16. Susan A. J. Stuart (2003). A Metaphysical Approach to the Mind. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (3):223-37.score: 30.0
    It is argued that, based on Kant's descriptive metaphysics, one can prescribe the necessary metaphysical underpinnings for the possibility of conscious experience in an artificial system. This project is developed by giving an account of the a priori concepts of the understanding in such a system. A specification and implementation of the nomological conditions for a conscious system allows one to know a priori that any system possessing this structure will be conscious; thus enabling us to avoid possible false-indicators of (...)
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  17. Susan A. J. Stuart (2007). Machine Consciousness: Cognitive and Kinaesthetic Imagination. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (7):141-153.score: 30.0
    Machine consciousness exists already in organic systems and it is only a matter of time -- and some agreement -- before it will be realised in reverse-engineered organic systems and forward- engineered inorganic systems. The agreement must be over the preconditions that must first be met if the enterprise is to be successful, and it is these preconditions, for instance, being a socially-embedded, structurally-coupled and dynamic, goal-directed entity that organises its perceptual input and enacts its world through the application of (...)
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  18. Susan A. J. Stuart (2002). A Radical Notion of Embeddedness: A Logically Necessary Precondition for Agency and Self-Awareness. Metaphilosophy 33 (1-2):98-109.score: 30.0
    The aim of this paper is to establish the logically necessary preconditions for the existence of self-awareness in an artificial or a natural agent. We examine the terms, agent, situated, embodied, embedded, and representation, as employed ubiquitously in cognitive science, attempting to clarify their meaning and the limits of their use. We discuss the minimal conditions for an agent’s environment constituting a ‘world’ and reject most, though not all, types of virtual world. We argue that to qualify as genuinely situated (...)
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  19. Susan A. J. Stuart (2007). Michael Tye, Consciousness and Persons; Unity and Identity. Minds and Machines 17 (3):365-367.score: 30.0
    The crux of this book is expressed in one short sentence from the Preface: 'Unity is a fundamental part of our experience, something that is crucial to its phenomenology' [p.xii], and the crux of this sentence is that the unity of consciousness is not a matter of phenomenal relations existing between distinct experiences – the received view [p.17], but the existence of relations between the contents of experiences – the one experience view [p.25ff]. In its simplest form Tye's claim is (...)
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  20. Ron Chrisley, I. Aleksander, S. Bringsjord, R. Clowes, J. Parthemore, S. Stuart, S. Torrance & T. Ziemke (2008). Assessing Artificial Consciousness: A Collective Review Article. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (7):95-110.score: 30.0
    While the recent special issue of JCS on machine consciousness (Volume 14, Issue 7) was in preparation, a collection of papers on the same topic, entitled Artificial Consciousness and edited by Antonio Chella and Riccardo Manzotti, was published. The editors of the JCS special issue, Ron Chrisley, Robert Clowes and Steve Torrance, thought it would be a timely and productive move to have authors of papers in their collection review the papers in the Chella and Manzotti book, and include these (...)
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  21. Fred O. Ede, Bhagaban Panigrahi, Jon Stuart & Stephen Calcich (2000). Ethics in Small Minority Businesses. Journal of Business Ethics 26 (2):133 - 146.score: 30.0
    The management literature is replete with studies on business ethics. Unfortunately, most of these studies have dealt exclusively with ethics in large businesses. Although a handful of studies can be found on small business ethics, none has paid attention to the issue of ethics in small minority businesses. Similarly, several studies on ethics have utilized the Wood et al. (1988) 16-vignette ethics scale, although reliability and validity issues associated with the scale have never been fully addressed. In this study, a (...)
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  22. H. W. Stuart (1937). Knowledge and Self-Consciousness. Philosophical Review 46 (6):609-643.score: 30.0
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  23. Elizabeth Stuart (1988). The Condemnation of Anglican Orders in the Light of the Roman Catholic Reaction to the Oxford Movement. Heythrop Journal 29 (1):86–98.score: 30.0
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  24. Jim Stuart (2004). A Virtue-Ethical Approach to Moral Conflicts Involving the Possibility of Self-Sacrifice. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (1):21–33.score: 30.0
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  25. Henry W. Stuart (1920). A Reversal of Perspective in Ethical Theory. Philosophical Review 29 (4):340-354.score: 30.0
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  26. Alan L. Stuart (1963). Evolutionary Man. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 14 (53):41-53.score: 30.0
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  27. S. I. M. Stuart (1989). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 29 (3).score: 30.0
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  28. H. W. Stuart (1938). The Metaphysic of Experience. Philosophical Review 47 (4):420-433.score: 30.0
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  29. Henry W. Stuart (1904). The Need of a Logic of Conduct. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 1 (13):344-350.score: 30.0
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  30. Alan L. Stuart (1961). The Sciences and Deity. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 12 (47):235-245.score: 30.0
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  31. Helen Ruth McCabe (2014). John Stuart Mill's Philosophy of Persuasion. Informal Logic 34 (1):38-61.score: 24.0
    In his youth, John Stuart Mill followed his father’s philosophy of persuasion but, in 1830, Mill adopted a new philosophy of persuasion, trying to lead people incrementally towards the truth from their original stand-points rather than engage them antagonistically. Understanding this change helps us understand apparent contradictions in Mill’s cannon, as he disguises some of his more radical ideas in order to bring his audience to re-assess and authentically change their opinions. It also suggests a way of re-assessing the (...)
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  32. Rosario López Sánchez (2013). El principio de nacionalidad en John Stuart Mill: propuestas para un estudio desde la historia contextual. Telos 18 (1-2):63-76.score: 24.0
    The paper offers an interpretation of the role the concept of nationality plays in John Stuart Mill’s thought. To that purpose, I consider not only his best-known writings, but also those less frequently studied in the academic literature on that issue. The argument benefits from Quentin Skinner’s methodological insights into the study of the history of political thought. In that sense, I focus on Mill’s System of Logic textual revisions. In doing so, I briefly examine Mill’s intellectual and personal (...)
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  33. Xaquelina Matesanz Tojeiro (2011). Reseña de "John Stuart Mill: Tres ensayos sobre la religión, editado y traducido por Carlos Mellizo". Telos 18 (1-2):313-318.score: 24.0
    Review of "John Stuart Mill: Tres ensayos sobre la religión (La naturaleza; La utilidad de la religión; El teísmo), editado y traducido por Carlos Mellizo, Madrid, Editorial Tecnos, 2012. ISBN 13: 978-84-309-5502-2".
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  34. Colin Heydt, Mill, John Stuart — A. Overview. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
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  35. Guy Fletcher (2011). Review of Ben Eggleston, Dale Miller & David Weinstein (Eds.), John Stuart Mill and the Art of Life. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.score: 21.0
  36. John Woods (1999). John Stuart Mill (1806--1873). Argumentation 13 (3):317-334.score: 21.0
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  37. John Stuart Mill (1961). The Philosophy of John Stuart Mill: Ethical, Political, and Religious. New York, Modern Library.score: 21.0
    Bentham.--Coleridge.--M. de Tocqueville on democracy in America.--On liberty.--Utilitarianism.--From Considerations on representative government.--From An examination of Sir William Hamilton's philosophy, volume 1.--From Three essays on religion.--John Stuart Mill, a select bibliography (p. [525]-530).
     
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  38. Daniel Jacobson (2008). Utilitarianism Without Consequentialism: The Case of John Stuart Mill. Philosophical Review 117 (2):159-191.score: 18.0
    This essay argues, flouting paradox, that Mill was a utilitarian but not a consequentialist. First, it contends that there is logical space for a view that deserves to be called utilitarian despite its rejection of consequentialism; second, that this logical space is, in fact, occupied by John Stuart Mill. The key to understanding Mill's unorthodox utilitarianism and the role it plays in his moral philosophy is to appreciate his sentimentalist metaethics—especially his account of wrongness in terms of fitting guilt (...)
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  39. P. M. S. Hacker (2005). Thought and Action: A Tribute to Stuart Hampshire. Philosophy 80 (2):175-197.score: 18.0
    The paper is a tribute to the late Stuart Hampshire's investigations of the ramifying role of intention in our conceptual scheme. It surveys the central argument of Thought and Action and the third chapter of Freedom of the Individual. Emphasis is placed upon Hampshire's constructive account of human agency and consequent description of the manner in which perception and action are interwoven. His analysis of the character of intentional action, self-knowledge and autonomy is described. Various lacunae in Hampshire's account (...)
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  40. Íñigo Álvarez Gálvez (2009). Utilitarismo y Derechos Humanos: La Propuesta de John Stuart Mill. Plaza y Valdés.score: 18.0
    Se dice que el utilitarismo es incompatible con la defensa de los derechos humanos, pues la búsqueda del mayor bien para el mayor número que prescribe el utilitarismo, puede exigir, en ocasiones, pasar por encima de los derechos. Sin embargo, quizá sea posible ofrecer una solución al conflicto presentando una doctrina utilitarista, reconocible como tal, que sea lo suficientemente amplia como para dar cabida a los derechos. La presente obra tiene como objeto exponer la doctrina de John Stuart Mill (...)
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  41. John Stuart Mill (2006). The Collected Works of John Stuart Mill. Liberty Fund.score: 18.0
  42. Daniel M. Hausman (1981). John Stuart Mill's Philosophy of Economics. Philosophy of Science 48 (3):363-385.score: 18.0
    John Stuart Mill regards economics as an inexact and separate science which employs a deductive method. This paper analyzes and restates Mill's views and considers whether they help one to understand philosophical peculiarities of contemporary microeconomic theory. The author concludes that it is philosophically enlightening to interpret microeconomics as an inexact and separate science, but that Mill's notion of a deductive method has only a little to contribute.
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  43. Elijah Millgram (2009). John Stuart Mill, Determinism, and the Problem of Induction. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (2):183-199.score: 18.0
    Auguste Comte's doctrine of the three phases through which sciences pass (the theological, the metaphysical, and the positive) allows us to explain what John Stuart Mill was attempting in his magnum opus, the System of Logic: namely, to move the science of logic to its terminal and 'positive' stage. Both Mill's startling account of deduction and his unremarked solution to the Humean problem of induction eliminate the notions of necessity or force—in this case, the 'logical must'—characteristic of a science's (...)
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  44. Raphael Cohen-Almagor, John Stuart Mill.score: 18.0
    John Stuart Mill's concept of ethics was closely related to his firm belief in freedom. He was strictly a believer in each person bringing the greatest degree of happiness or good to the greatest number. This would be an individual act and in no way a forced action. One is free to act without coercion as long as no harm is brought to another person. Consequences must be considered carefully before acting and the act chosen must be the best (...)
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  45. John Stuart Mill, The Autobiography of John Stuart Mill.score: 18.0
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  46. Stephen Nathanson (2005). John Stuart Mill on the Ownership and Use of Land. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 12 (2):10-16.score: 18.0
    My aim in this paper is to describe some of John Stuart Mill’s views about property rights in land and some implications he drew for public policy. While Mill defends private ownership of land, he emphasizes the ways in which ownership of land is an anomaly that does not fit neatly into the usual views about private ownership. While most of MiII’s discussion assumes the importance of maximizing the productivity of land, he anticipates contemporary environmentalists by also expressing concerns (...)
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  47. S. H. Vollmer (2003). The Philosophy of Chemistry Reformulating Itself: Nalni Bhushan and Stuart Rosenfeld's of Minds and Molecules: New Philosophical Perspectives on Chemistry. Philosophy of Science 70 (2):383-390.score: 18.0
    Philosophers of chemistry, following the lead of physicists, have been slow to realize that molecular descriptions issuing from quantum mechanics in the absence of chemical theory are fatally flawed. In the wake of this realization, new topics have begun to unfoldincluding new metaphysical issues, new concerns about the philosophy of chemistry's place in the philosophy of science, and new accounts of how properties are observed, inferred, and presented. A recent collection of essays, Of Minds and Molecules: New Philosophical Perspectives on (...)
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  48. Stephen Jay Gould, "The Pattern of Life's History" Stuart Kauffman: Steve is Extremely Bright, Inventive. He Thoroughly Understands Paleontology; He Thoroughly Understands Evolutionary Biology. He Has.. [REVIEW]score: 18.0
    Stuart Kauffman: Steve is extremely bright, inventive. He thoroughly understands paleontology; he thoroughly understands evolutionary biology. He has performed an enormous service in getting people to think about punctuated equilibrium, because you see the process of stasis/sudden change, which is a puzzle. It's the cessation of change for long periods of time. Since you always have mutations, why don't things continue changing? You either have to say that the particular form is highly adapted, optimal, and exists in a stable (...)
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  49. Sean Donaghue Johnston (2011). John Stuart Mill on Health Care Reform. Social Philosophy Today 27:63-74.score: 18.0
    In this essay, I explore John Stuart Mill’s theory of government and its application to the issue of health care reform. In particular, I ask whether Mill’s theory of government would justify or condemn the creation of a public health-insurance option. Although Mill’s deep distrust of governmental authority would seem to align him with Republicans, Tea Partiers, libertarians, and others, who cast the public option as a “government takeover” of “our” health care system, I argue that Mill offers good (...)
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  50. John V. Strong (1978). John Stuart Mill, John Herschel, and the 'Probability of Causes'. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1978:31 - 41.score: 18.0
    While historians of scientific method have recently called attention to the views of many of John Stuart Mill's contemporaries on the relation between probability and inductive inference, little if any note has been taken of Mill's own vigorous attack on the received "Laplacean" interpretation of probability in the first (1843) edition of the System of Logic. This paper examines the place of Mill's critique, both in the overall framework of his philosophy, and in the tradition of assessing the (...)
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