Search results for 'Metaphor' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elisabeth Camp (2006). Metaphor in the Mind: The Cognition of Metaphor. Philosophy Compass 1 (2):154-170.score: 24.0
    Philosophers have often adopted a dismissive attitude toward metaphor. Hobbes (1651, ch. 8) advocated excluding metaphors from rational discourse because they “openly profess deceit,” while Locke (1690, Bk. 3, ch. 10) claimed that figurative uses of language serve only “to insinuate wrong ideas, move the passions, and thereby mislead the judgment; and so indeed are perfect cheats.” Later, logical positivists like Ayer and Carnap assumed that because metaphors like..
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  2. Jim Hopkins (2000). Psychoanalysis, Metaphor, and the Concept of Mind. In M. Levine (ed.), The Analytic Freud. Routledge. 11--35.score: 24.0
    In order to understand both consciousness and the Freudian unconscious we need to understand the notion of innerness that we apply to the mind. We can partly do so via the use of the theory of conceptual metaphor, and this casts light on a number of related topics.
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  3. Kendall L. Walton, Metaphor, Fictionalism, Make-Believe: Response to Elisabeth Camp.score: 24.0
    Prop oriented make-believe is make-believe utilized for the purpose of understanding what I call “props,” actual objects or states of affairs that make propositions “fictional,” true in the make-believe world. I, David Hills, and others have claimed that prop oriented make-believe lies at the heart of the functioning of many metaphors, and one variety of fictionalism in metaphysics invokes prop oriented make-believe to explain away apparent references to entities some find questionable or problematic (fictional characters, propositions, moral properties, numbers). Elisabeth (...)
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  4. Samuel D. Guttenplan (2005). Objects of Metaphor. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Objects of Metaphor puts forward a philosophical account of metaphor radically different from those currently on offer. Powerful and flexible enough to cope with the syntactic complexity typical of genuine metaphor, it offers novel conceptions of the relationship between simile and metaphor, the notion of dead metaphor, and the idea of metaphor as a robust theoretic kind. Without denying that metaphor can sometimes be merely ornamental, Guttenplan justifies the view of metaphor as (...)
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  5. Mark Phelan (2010). The Inadequacy of Paraphrase is the Dogma of Metaphor. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):481-506.score: 24.0
    Philosophers have alleged that paraphrases of metaphors are inadequate. They have presented this inadequacy as a datum predicted by, and thus a reason to accept, particular accounts of ‘metaphorical meanings.’ But to what, specifically, does this inadequacy claim amount? I argue that, if this assumption is to have any bearing on the metaphor debate, it must be construed as the comparative claim that paraphrases of metaphors are inadequate compared to paraphrases of literal utterances. But the evidence philosophers have offered (...)
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  6. Victoria S. Harrison (2007). Metaphor, Religious Language, and Religious Experience. Sophia 46 (2):127-145.score: 24.0
    Is it possible to talk about God without either misrepresentation or failing to assert anything of significance? The article begins by reviewing how, in attempting to answer this question, traditional theories of religious language have failed to sidestep both potential pitfalls adequately. After arguing that recently developed theories of metaphor seem better able to shed light on the nature of religious language, it considers the claim that huge areas of our language and, consequently, of our experience are shaped by (...)
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  7. Neil Pickering (2006). The Metaphor of Mental Illness. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Introduction : the existence of mental illness -- The likeness argument -- The categorical argument -- Metaphor -- Two metaphors from physical medicine -- The metaphor of mental illness -- Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, social construction, and metaphor -- Metaphors and models.
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  8. Jakub Mácha (2011). Metaphor in the Twilight Area Between Philosophy and Linguistics. In P. Stalmaszczyk & K. Kosecki (eds.), Turning Points in the Philosophy of Language and Linguistics. Peter Lang. 159--169.score: 24.0
    This paper investigates the issue whether metaphors have a metaphorical or secondary meaning and how this question is related to the borderline between philosophy and linguistics. On examples by V. Woolf and H. W. Auden, it will be shown that metaphor accomplishes something more than its literal meaning expresses and this “more” cannot be captured by any secondary meaning. What is essential in the metaphor is not a secondary meaning but an internal relation between a metaphorical proposition and (...)
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  9. Clive Cazeaux (2011). Living Metaphor. Studi Filosofici 34 (1):291-308.score: 24.0
    The concept of ‘living metaphor’ receives a number of articulations within metaphor theory. A review of four key theories – Nietzsche, Ricoeur, Lakoff and Johnson, and Derrida – reveals a distinction between theories which identify a prior, speculative nature working on or with metaphor, and theories wherein metaphor is shown to be performatively always, already active in thought. The two cannot be left as alternatives because they exhibit opposing theses with regard to the ontology of (...), but neither can an impartial philosophical appraisal of the most cogent or defensible theory be made, since the status and conduct of philosophy are part of the problem. Two responses to the predicament from within ‘living metaphor’ theory are considered: (1) Lakoff and Johnson’s ecological spirituality thesis which promises to make the contest redundant on the grounds that the origin of human concepts in our shared, embodied condition in the world removes all obstructions; (2) taking the lead from Nietzsche and Ricoeur, an approach based on the intersection of discourses, not as a resolution but as a gesture which allows the conflict to speak about ‘living metaphor’. (1) is shown to be unsuccessful, but (2) results in ‘living metaphor’ emerging as an attentiveness to questions of what does and does not belong, inspired by tensions between ‘is’ and ‘is not’, ‘from this perspective’ and ‘from that perspective’, and ‘is spoken about’ and ‘is spoken with’. (shrink)
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  10. Trevor Whittock (1990). Metaphor and Film. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    In Metaphor and Film, Trevor Whittock demonstrates that feature films are permeated by metaphors that were consciously introduced by directors. An examination of cinematic metaphor forces us to reconsider the nature of metaphor itself, and the ways by which such visual imagery can be recognised and understood, as well as interpreted. Metaphor and Film identifies the principal forms of cinematic metaphor, and also provides an analysis of the mental operations that one must bring to it. (...)
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  11. Michiel Leezenberg (2001). Contexts of Metaphor. Elsevier.score: 24.0
    This study presents an approach to metaphor that systematically takes contextual factors into account. It analyses how metaphors both depend on, and change, the context in which they are uttered, and specifically, how metaphorical interpretation involves the articulation of asserted, implied and presupposed material. It supplements this semantic analysis with a practice-based account of metaphor at the conceptual level, which stresses the role of sociocultural factors in concept formation.
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  12. Kim Cuddington (2001). The “Balance of Nature” Metaphor and Equilibrium in Population Ecology. Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):463-479.score: 24.0
    I claim that the balance of nature metaphoris shorthand for a paradigmatic view of natureas a beneficent force. I trace the historicalorigins of this concept and demonstrate that itoperates today in the discipline of populationecology. Although it might be suspected thatthis metaphor is a pre-theoretic description ofthe more precisely defined notion ofequilibrium, I demonstrate that balance ofnature has constricted the meaning ofmathematical equilibrium in population ecology.As well as influencing the meaning ofequilibrium, the metaphor has also loaded themathematical term (...)
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  13. Josef Stern (2011). Metaphor and Minimalism. Philosophical Studies 153 (2):273 - 298.score: 24.0
    This paper argues first that, contrary to what one would expect, metaphorical interpretations of utterances pass two of Cappelan and Lepore's Minimalist tests for semantic context-sensitivity. I then propose how, in light of that result, one might analyze metaphors on the model of indexicals and demonstratives, expressions that (even) Minimalists agree are semantically context-dependent. This analysis builds on David Kaplan's semantics for demonstratives and refines an earlier proposal in (Stern, Metaphor in context, MIT Press, Cambridge, 2000). In the course (...)
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  14. Joseph U. Neisser (2003). The Swaying Form: Imagination, Metaphor, Embodiment. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (1):27-53.score: 24.0
    How is it that metaphors are meaningful, yet we have so much trouble saying exactly what they mean? I argue that metaphoric thought is an act of imagination, mediated by the contingent form of human embodiment. Metaphoric cognition is an example of the productive interplay between intentional imagery and the body scheme, a process of imaginal modeling. The case of metaphor marks the intersection of linguistic and psychological processes and demonstrates the need for a multi-disciplinary approach not only in (...)
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  15. E. Jennifer Ashworth (2007). Metaphor and the Logicians From Aristotle to Cajetan. Vivarium 45 (s 2-3):311-327.score: 24.0
    I examine the treatment of metaphor by medieval logicians and how it stemmed from their reception of classical texts in logic, grammar, and rhetoric. I consider the relation of the word 'metaphor' to the notions of translatio and transumptio, and show that it is not always synonymous with these. I also show that in the context of commentaries on the Sophistical Refutations metaphor was subsumed under equivocation. In turn, it was linked with the notion of analogy not (...)
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  16. Stevan Harnad (1982). Metaphor and Mental Duality. In Language, Mind, And Brain. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.score: 24.0
    I am going to attempt to argue, given certain premises, there are reasons, not only empirical, but also logical, for expecting a certain division of labor in the processing of information by the human brain. This division of labor consists specifically of a functional bifurcation into what may be called, to a first approximation, "verbal" and "nonverbal" modes of information- processing. That this dichotomy is not quite satisfactory, however, will be one of the principal conclusions of this chapter, for I (...)
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  17. Ricardo Noguera‐Solano (2013). The Metaphor of the Architect in Darwin: Chance and Free Will. Zygon 48 (4):859-874.score: 24.0
    In The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication, published in 1868, Darwin used the metaphor of the architect to argue in favor of natural autonomy and to clarify the role of chance in his theory of adaptive change by variation and natural selection. In this article, I trace the history of this important heuristic instrument in Darwin's writings and letters and suggest that this metaphor was important to Darwin because it helps him to explain the role of (...)
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  18. Clive Cazeaux (2007). Metaphor and Continental Philosophy: From Kant to Derrida. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Kant and Heidegger on the creation of objectivity -- The power of judgment : metaphor in the structure of Kant's third Critique -- Sensation, categorization, and embodiment : Locke, Merleau-Ponty, and Lakoff and Johnson -- Heidegger and the senses -- Conflicting perspectives : epistemology and ontology in Nietzsche's will to power -- Cutting nature at the joints : metaphor and epistemology in the science wars -- Opening and belonging : between subject and object in Heidegger and Bachelard -- (...)
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  19. Kathleen Stock (2013). Some Reflections on Seeing-as, Metaphor-Grasping and Imagining. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (1):201-213.score: 24.0
    In this paper I examine the frequently made claim that grasping a metaphor is a kind of ‘seeing-as’. I describe several ways in which it might be thought that metaphor-grasping is importantly similar to seeing-as, such that an extension of the latter category is though justified to include the former. For some of these similarities, I suggest they are illusory; for others, I argue that they are shared in virtue of the membership of both seeing-as and metaphor-grasping (...)
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  20. Frederic Gilbert, Lawrence Burns & Timothy Krahn (2011). The Inheritance, Power and Predicaments of the “Brain-Reading” Metaphor. Medicine Studies 2 (4):229-244.score: 24.0
    Purpose With the increasing sophistication of neuroimaging technologies in medicine, new language is being sought to make sense of the findings. The aim of this paper is to explore whether the brain-reading metaphor used to convey current medical or neurobiological findings imports unintended significations that do not necessarily reflect the genuine findings made by physicians and neuroscientists. Methods First, the paper surveys the ambiguities of the readability metaphor, drawing from the history of science and medicine, paying special attention (...)
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  21. Guichun Guo (2007). The Methodological Significance of Scientific Metaphor. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (3):437-453.score: 24.0
    The essential significance of scientific metaphor lies in applying the general metaphorical theory to specific interpretations and elaborations of scientific theories to form a methodology of scientific explanation. It is a contextual grasp of objective reality. A given metaphorical context and its grasp of the essence of reality can only be valid when the context is continually restructured. Taking the context as a whole, the methodological characteristic of scientific metaphor lies in the unity of understanding and choice, experience (...)
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  22. Xiaoxi Huang, Huaxin Huang, Beishui Liao & Cihua Xu (2013). An Ontology-Based Approach to Metaphor Cognitive Computation. Minds and Machines 23 (1):105-121.score: 24.0
    Language understanding is one of the most important characteristics for human beings. As a pervasive phenomenon in natural language, metaphor is not only an essential thinking approach, but also an ingredient in human conceptual system. Many of our ways of thinking and experiences are virtually represented metaphorically. With the development of the cognitive research on metaphor, it is urgent to formulate a computational model for metaphor understanding based on the cognitive mechanism, especially with the view to promoting (...)
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  23. Phillip Wolff & Dedre Gentner (2011). Structure-Mapping in Metaphor Comprehension. Cognitive Science 35 (8):1456-1488.score: 24.0
    Metaphor has a double life. It can be described as a directional process in which a stable, familiar base domain provides inferential structure to a less clearly specified target. But metaphor is also described as a process of finding commonalities, an inherently symmetric process. In this second view, both concepts may be altered by the metaphorical comparison. Whereas most theories of metaphor capture one of these aspects, we offer a model based on structure-mapping that captures both sides (...)
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  24. Robert C. Robinson (2011). Causation as Metaphor. Rupkatha Journal On Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities 3 (1):181—190.score: 24.0
    The thesis of this paper is that causation, when described and treated as a metaphor, increases in explanatory power, while diminishing the problems associated with standard analysis of it. I first present a description of the uses of metaphor in scientific and literary language. This is drawn primarily from Max Black's interaction view of metaphor, as well as the view forwarded by Donald Davidson in his What Metaphors Mean. I then outline some of the standard analyses in (...)
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  25. Jennifer Greenwood & Ann Bonner (2008). The Role of Theory-Constitutive Metaphor in Nursing Science. Nursing Philosophy 9 (3):154-168.score: 24.0
    Abstract The current view of theoretical statements in science is that they should be literal and precise; ambiguous and metaphorical statements are useful only as pre-theoretical, exegetical, and heuristic devices and as pedagogical tools. In this paper we argue that this view is mistaken. Literal, precise statements apply to those experiential phenomena which can be defined either conventionally by criterial attribution or by internal atomic constitution. Experiential phenomena which are defined relationally and/or functionally, like nursing, in virtue of their nature, (...)
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  26. R. Brüning & G. Lohmann (1999). Charles S. Peirce on Creative Metaphor: A Case Study on the Conveyor Belt Metaphor in Oceanography. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 4 (4):389-403.score: 24.0
    Within Charles Sanders Peirce''s semiotical theory, twodifferent kinds of creative metaphorical reasoning inscience can be identified. One of these, the buildingof remainder metaphors, is especially important forcreating new scientific models. We show that theconveyor belt metaphor provides an excellent examplefor Peirce''s theory. The conveyor belt metaphor hasrecently been invented in order to describe theoceanic transport system. The paradigm of the oceanicconveyor belt strongly influenced the geosciencecommunity and the climate change discussion. Afteridentifying structures of metaphorical reasoning inscience (section 2), (...)
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  27. Jakub Mácha (2012). Searle on Metaphor. Organon F 19 (supplementary issue no. 2):186-197.score: 24.0
    The main aim of this paper is to survey and evaluate Searle’s account of metaphor (1979) in the light of Davidson’s arguments against the idea of metaphorical meaning, which appeared at roughly the same time. Since this paper is intended for a festschrift celebrating Searle’s respectable anniversary, I will mostly refrain from critical remarks and rather focus on the positive aspects of his account. I am going to show that Searle’s theory of metaphor is for the most part (...)
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  28. Gregory Moore (2002). Nietzsche, Biology, and Metaphor. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Nietzsche, Biology and Metaphor explores the German philosopher's response to the intellectual debates sparked by the publication of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species. By examining the abundance of biological metaphors in Nietzsche's writings, Gregory Moore questions his recent reputation as an eminently subversive and (post) modern thinker, and shows how deeply Nietzsche was immersed in late nineteenth-century debates on evolution, degeneration and race. The first part of the book provides a detailed study and new interpretation of Nietzsche's much disputed (...)
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  29. Cihua Xu & Hengwei Li (2011). Abduction and Metaphor: An Inquiry Into Common Cognitive Mechanism. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (3):480-491.score: 24.0
    Abduction and metaphor are two significant concepts in cognitive science. It is found that the both mental processes are on the basis of certain similarity. The similarity inspires us to seek the answers to the following two questions: (1) Whether there is a common cognitive mechanism behind abduction and metaphor? And (2) if there is, whether this common mechanism could be interpreted within the unified frame of modern intelligence theory? Centering on these two issues, the paper attempts to (...)
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  30. Jakub Mácha (2009). Metaphor: Perceiving an Internal Relation. In Contributions of the Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society.score: 24.0
    The problem of metaphor has come to a noteworthy revival in the analytical philosophy of today. Despite all progress that has been made, the majority of important studies consider the function of metaphor as an analogue to visual perception. Such comparison may be conceived as metaphor as well. In his late philosophy, Wittgenstein spent a lot of effort to explain the use of the expression "seeing as". I argue that his explanations can be transposed to the explanation (...)
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  31. Robert Boyd Skipper (2002). Objects in Space As Metaphor for the Internet. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 9 (1):83-88.score: 24.0
    Despite the apparent aptness of the spatial model for Internet concepts, I will try to show that the paradigm is in fact very misleading and unnatural First, I argue that Cyberspace lacks the central features that constitute a space. Then I show that the metaphor creates a poor conceptual model that yields false or misleading conclusions about how Cyberspace functions.
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  32. Miguel de Beistegui (2012). Proust as Philosopher: The Art of Metaphor. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Looking for joy -- Proust among the psychologists -- Finding joy (involuntary memory) -- Giving joy (metaphor) -- Dress or patchwork?
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  33. Israel Scheffler (1979). Beyond the Letter: A Philosophical Inquiry Into Ambiguity, Vagueness, and Metaphor in Language. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 24.0
    Ambiguity, vagueness and metaphor are pervasive features of language, deserving of systematic study in their own right. Yet they have frequently been considered mere deviations from ideal language or obstacles to be avoided in the construction of scientific systems. First published in 1979, Beyond the Letter offers a consecutive study of these features from a philosphical point of view, providing analyses of each and treating their relations to one another. Addressed to the fundamental task of logical and semantic explanation, (...)
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  34. Akira Utsumi (2011). Computational Exploration of Metaphor Comprehension Processes Using a Semantic Space Model. Cognitive Science 35 (2):251-296.score: 24.0
    Recent metaphor research has revealed that metaphor comprehension involves both categorization and comparison processes. This finding has triggered the following central question: Which property determines the choice between these two processes for metaphor comprehension? Three competing views have been proposed to answer this question: the conventionality view (Bowdle & Gentner, 2005), aptness view (Glucksberg & Haught, 2006b), and interpretive diversity view (Utsumi, 2007); these views, respectively, argue that vehicle conventionality, metaphor aptness, and interpretive diversity determine the (...)
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  35. Mark Olson & Alfonso Arroyo-Santos (2009). Thinking in Continua: Beyond the Adaptive Radiation Metaphor. Bioessays 31 (12):1337-1346.score: 24.0
    ‘‘Adaptive radiation’’ is an evocative metaphor for explosive evolutionary divergence, which for over 100 years has given a powerful heuristic to countless scientists working on all types of organisms at all phylogenetic levels. However, success has come at the price of making ‘‘adaptive radiation’’ so vague that it can no longer reflect the detailed results yielded by powerful new phylogeny-based techniques that quantify continuous adaptive radiation variables such as speciation rate, phylogenetic tree shape, and morphological diversity. Attempts to shoehorn (...)
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  36. Paul C. Martin (2013). The Exploratory and Reflective Domain of Metaphor in the Comparison of Religions. Zygon 48 (4):936-965.score: 24.0
    There has been a longstanding interest in discovering or uncovering resemblances among what are ostensibly diverse religious schemas by employing a range of methodological approaches and tools. However, it is generally considered a problematic undertaking. Jonathan Z. Smith has produced a large body of work aimed at explicating this and has tacitly based his model of comparison on metaphor, which is traditionally understood to connote similarity between two or more things, as based on a linguistic or pragmatic assessment. However, (...)
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  37. Valentina Bambini, Marta Ghio, Andrea Moro & Petra B. Schumacher (2013). Differentiating Among Pragmatic Uses of Words Through Timed Sensicality Judgments: Metaphor, Metonymy and Approximation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Pragmatic and cognitive accounts of figurative language posit a difference between metaphor and metonymy in terms of underlying conceptual operations. Recently, other pragmatic uses of words have been accounted for in the Relevance Theory framework, such as approximation, described in terms of conceptual adjustment that varies in degree and direction with respect to the case of metaphor. Despite the theoretical distinctions, there is very poor experimental evidence addressing the metaphor/metonymy distinction, and none concerning approximation. Here we used (...)
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  38. Kenneth Masong (2012). Metaphor, Poiesis and Hermeneutical Ontology: Paul Ricoeur and the Turn to Language. Pan Pacific Journal of Philosophy, Education and Management 1 (1).score: 24.0
    Reacting against the turn to transcendence that heavily characterized the medieval worldview, the modern worldview is fundamentally exemplified by a threefold turn to immanence, consisting of a subjective turn, a linguistic turn and an experiential turn. Language plays a pivotal role here since it mediates between the subjective and the experiential. Ricoeur’s treatment of metaphor, significantly laid out in his The Rule of Metaphor, is crucial in bringing about this linguistic turn that mediates the subject and its experience (...)
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  39. Miguel de Beistegui (2012). Aesthetics After Metaphysics: From Mimesis to Metaphor. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Aesthetics and metaphysics I: the mimetic schema -- Aesthetics and metaphysics II: from Kant to Adorno -- Aesthetics at the limit of metaphysics: intimations of the hypersensible -- Metaphor beyond metaphysics? -- Literature: Proust, Hölderlin -- Sculpture: Chillida.
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  40. Gerald J. Johnson (1992). Talking About Computers: From Metaphor to Jargon. [REVIEW] AI and Society 6 (3):263-270.score: 24.0
    The language used to talk about computers is uniquely colorful and sometimes extraordinarily difficult. This paper examines ‘computer discourse’ and points out its highly metaphorical nature. While the use of metaphor is unavoidable, it often leads, especially in informal settings, to the mannered use of words we call jargon. Metaphor becomes jargon when it is used too literally in a self-conscious manner. Experts often use their metaphors as though they were literally true. Technical details fall away and the (...)
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  41. András Kertész (forthcoming). The Puzzle of Thought Experiments in Conceptual Metaphor Research. Foundations of Science:1-28.score: 24.0
    How can thought experiments lead to new empirical knowledge if they do not make use of empirical information? This puzzle has been widely discussed in the philosophy of science. It arises in conceptual metaphor research as well and is especially important for the clarification of its empirical foundations. The aim of the paper is to suggest a possible solution to the puzzle of thought experiments in conceptual metaphor research. The solution rests on the application of a novel metatheoretical (...)
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  42. Steve Oswald & Alain Rihs (2014). Metaphor as Argument: Rhetorical and Epistemic Advantages of Extended Metaphors. [REVIEW] Argumentation 28 (2):133-159.score: 24.0
    This paper examines from a cognitive perspective the rhetorical and epistemic advantages that can be gained from the use of (extended) metaphors in political discourse. We defend the assumption that extended metaphors can be argumentatively exploited, and provide two arguments in support of the claim. First, considering that each instantiation of the metaphorical mapping in the text may function as a confirmation of the overall relevance of the main core mapping, we argue that extended metaphors carry self-validating claims that increase (...)
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  43. Eric Steinhart (2001). The Logic of Metaphor: Analogous Parts of Possible Worlds. Kluwer Academic.score: 24.0
    The Logic of Metaphor uses techniques from possible worlds semantics to provide formal truth-conditions for many grammatical classes of metaphors. It gives logically precise and practically useful syntactic and semantic rules for generating and interpreting metaphors. These rules are implemented in a working computer program. The book treats the lexicon as a conceptual network with semantics provided by an intensional predicate calculus. It gives rules for finding analogies in such networks. It shows how to syntactically and semantically analyze texts (...)
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  44. Wendy Wheeler (2010). Delectable Creatures and the Fundamental Reality of Metaphor: Biosemiotics and Animal Mind. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 3 (3):277-287.score: 24.0
    This article argues that organisms, defined by a semi-permeable membrane or skin separating organism from environment, are (must be) semiotically alert responders to environments (both Innenwelt and Umwelt). As organisms and environments complexify over time, so, necessarily, does semiotic responsiveness, or ‘semiotic freedom’. In complex environments, semiotic responsiveness necessitates increasing plasticity of discernment, or discrimination. Such judgements, in other words, involve interpretations. The latter, in effect, consist of translations of a range of sign relations which, like metaphor, are based (...)
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  45. Jan Bröchner, Karsten Åström & Stefan Larsson (forthcoming). Intention in Hybrid Organizations: The Diffusion of the Business Metaphor in Swedish Laws. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-16.score: 24.0
    Recent studies of conceptual metaphors in a legal context have often dealt with the power of embodiment. However, the connotations of culturally originated metaphors could be different when they appear in laws and regulations. In particular, the role of metaphor when the legislator wishes to define intention in hybrid organizations is investigated here. The case studied is how a conceptual metaphor of ‘business’ manifesting itself in the Swedish simile adjective affärsmässig (businesslike) has spread over 40 years. ‘Business’ early (...)
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  46. Marcel Danesi (2012). The Languages of the Law: An Integrated View From Vico and Conceptual Metaphor Theory. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 25 (1):95-106.score: 24.0
    Work on the relation between figurative language and the law is a fairly recent trend, within legal discourse studies, linguistics, and semiotics. The work in conceptual metaphor theory, for example, is starting to unpack the underlying metaphorical and metonymic structure of legal language, producing some new and important insights into the nature of this language. Missing from this emerging line of inquiry are the views of the Neapolitan philosopher Giambattista Vico, who was the first to understand the power of (...)
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  47. Stephen J. Flusberg, Paul H. Thibodeau, Daniel A. Sternberg & Jeremy J. Glick (2010). A Connectionist Approach to Embodied Conceptual Metaphor. Frontiers in Psychology 1:197-197.score: 24.0
    A growing body of data has been gathered in support of the view that the mind is embodied and that cognition is grounded in sensory-motor processes. Some researchers have gone so far as to claim that this paradigm poses a serious challenge to central tenets of cognitive science, including the widely held view that the mind can be analyzed in terms of abstract computational principles. On the other hand, computational approaches to the study of mind have led to the development (...)
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  48. John Nolan (1992). The Computational Metaphor and Environmentalism. AI and Society 6 (1):50-61.score: 24.0
    The Computational Metaphor is an extremely influential notion, and more than any other trend has given rise to the field of Cognitive Science. Environmentalism is at present better formalised as a political movement than as a scientific paradigm, despite significant research by Gibson and his followers. This article attempts to address the difficult problem of synthesising these two apparently antagonistic research paradigms.
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  49. Maria Radosav (2010). Metafora cărţii. Percepţia cărţii ebraice în comunităţile nord transilvănene. Sec. XIX – XX/ The Metaphor of the Book. The Hebrew Book and Its Perception in the Jewish Communities of North Transylvania. The 19th and 20th Centuries. [REVIEW] Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (18):218-225.score: 24.0
    In Jewish tradition, the book as an “exemplary”, the book as an “object” is associated with an attitude of veneration as expressed by Pierre Chaunu in “livre en majeste” – the book in its majesty when referring to the Holy Bible. The content of the book is revealed by its own referentiality enclosed in its text and by its unfolding through reading. On the other hand, the title of the book may suggest the plenitude of its text, a semantic sublimation, (...)
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  50. Marina Rakova (2003). The Extent of the Literal: Metaphor, Polysemy and the Theories of Concepts. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    The Extent of the Literal develops a strikingly new approach to metaphor and polysemy in their relation to the conceptual structure. In a straightforward narrative style, the author argues for a reconsideration of standard assumptions concerning the notion of literal meaning and its relation to conceptual structure. She draws on neurophysiological and psychological experimental data in support of a view in which polysemy belongs to the level of words but not to the level of concepts, and thus challenges some (...)
     
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