Search results for 'Metaphysics embodiment' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Shimon Edelman (2011). The Metaphysics of Embodiment. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (02):321-.score: 78.0
    Shanahan’s eloquently argued version of the global workspace theory fits well into the emerging understanding of consciousness as a computational phenomenon. His disinclination toward metaphysics notwithstanding, Shanahan’s book can also be seen as supportive of a particular metaphysical stance on consciousness — the computational identity theory.
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  2. Jaroslav Trnka (2010). Embodiment and Metaphysics. Deconstruction as Lying Between Good and Bad Dialectic. Filosoficky Casopis 58 (1):57-64.score: 72.0
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  3. Jeremy Walker (1969). Embodiment and Self-Knowledge. Dialogue 8 (June):44-67.score: 66.0
  4. R. M. Zaner (1964). The Problem Of Embodiment; Some Contributions To A Phenomenology Of The Body. The Hague: Nijhoff.score: 66.0
  5. Peter Reynaert (2001). A Phenomenology for Qualia and Naturalizing Embodiment. Communication and Cognition 34 (1-2):139-154.score: 66.0
  6. John Sutton (2006). Introduction: Memory, Embodied Cognition, and the Extended Mind. Philosophical Psychology 19 (3):281-289.score: 54.0
    I introduce the seven papers in this special issue, by Andy Clark, Je´roˆme Dokic, Richard Menary, Jenann Ismael, Sue Campbell, Doris McIlwain, and Mark Rowlands. This paper explains the motivation for an alliance between the sciences of memory and the extended mind hypothesis. It examines in turn the role of worldly, social, and internalized forms of scaffolding to memory and cognition, and also highlights themes relating to affect, agency, and individual differences.
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  7. Shaun Gallagher (2005). How the Body Shapes the Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 54.0
    How the Body Shapes the Mind is an interdisciplinary work that addresses philosophical questions by appealing to evidence found in experimental psychology, neuroscience, studies of pathologies, and developmental psychology. There is a growing consensus across these disciplines that the contribution of embodiment to cognition is inescapable. Because this insight has been developed across a variety of disciplines, however, there is still a need to develop a common vocabulary that is capable of integrating discussions of brain mechanisms in neuroscience, behavioral (...)
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  8. Klaus Mainzer (2005). The Embodied Mind: On Computational, Evolutionary, and Philosophical Interpretations of Cognition. Synthesis Philosophica 2 (40):389-406.score: 54.0
  9. Anton Lethin (2002). How Do We Embody Intentionality? In Martin Hahn & B. Ramberg (eds.), Reflections and Replies: Essays on the Philosophy of Tyler Burge. Mit Press. 36-44.score: 54.0
  10. Alex Levine (2011). Epistemic Objects as Interactive Loci. Axiomathes 21 (1):57-66.score: 54.0
    Contemporary process metaphysics has achieved a number of important results, most significantly in accounting for emergence, a problem on which substance metaphysics has foundered since Plato. It also faces trenchant problems of its own, among them the related problems of boundaries and individuation. Historically, the quest for ontology may thus have been largely responsible for the persistence of substance metaphysics. But as Plato was well aware, an ontology of substantial things raises serious, perhaps insurmountable problems for any (...)
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  11. Søren Overgaard (2006). The Problem of Other Minds: Wittgenstein's Phenomenological Perspective. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):53-73.score: 50.0
    This paper discusses Wittgenstein's take on the problem of other minds. In opposition to certain widespread views that I collect under the heading of the “No Problem Interpretation,” I argue that Wittgenstein does address some problem of other minds. However, Wittgenstein's problem is not the traditional epistemological problem of other minds; rather, it is more reminiscent of the issue of intersubjectivity as it emerges in the writings of phenomenologists such as Husserl, Merleau-Ponty, and Heidegger. This is one sense in which (...)
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  12. Douglas C. Long (1977). Disembodied Existence, Physicalism, and the Mind-Body Problem. Philosophical Studies 31 (May):307-316.score: 50.0
    The idea that we may continue to exist in a bodiless condition after our death has long played an important role in beliefs about immortality, ultimate rewards and punishments, the transmigration of souls, and the like. There has also been long and heated disagreement about whether the idea of disembodied existence even makes sense, let alone whether anybody can or does survive dissolution of his material form. It may seem doubtful that anything new could be added to the debate at (...)
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  13. Richard Menary (2006). Radical Enactivism: Intentionality, Phenomenology and Narrative: Focus on the Philosophy of Daniel D. Hutto. Amsterdam: J Benjamins.score: 48.0
    This collection is a much-needed remedy to the confusion about which varieties of enactivism are robust yet viable rejections of traditional representionalism...
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  14. Max O. Hocutt (1974). Armstrong and Strawson on 'Disembodied Existence'. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 35 (September):46-59.score: 48.0
  15. Eric Saidel (1999). Critical Notice of Andy Clark, Being There. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (2):299-317.score: 48.0
     
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  16. Jack Reynolds (2004). Merleau-Ponty and Derrida: Intertwining Embodiment and Alterity. Ohio.score: 42.0
    While there have been many essays devoted to comparing the work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty with that of Jacques Derrida, there has been no sustained book-length treatment of these two French philosophers. Additionally, many of the essays presuppose an oppositional relationship between them, and between phenomenology and deconstruction more generally. -/- Jack Reynolds systematically explores their relationship by analyzing each philosopher in terms of two important and related issues—embodiment and alterity. Focusing on areas with which they are not commonly associated (...)
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  17. Christine Battersby (1998). The Phenomenal Woman: Feminist Metaphysics and the Patterns of Identity. Routledge.score: 42.0
    Christine Battersby rethinks questions of embodiment, essence, sameness and difference, self and "other", patriarchy and power. Using analyses of Kant, Adorno, Irigaray, Butler, Kierkegaard and Deleuze, she challenges those who argue that a feminist metaphysics is a a contradiction in terms. This book explores place for a metaphysics of fluidity in the current debates concerning postmodernism, feminism and identity politics.
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  18. Thomas W. Busch (1999). Circulating Being: From Embodiment to Incorporation: Essays on Late Existentialism. Fordham University Press.score: 42.0
    Existentialism has come to be identified as a critical, reactionary way of thinking, celebrating the individual, freedom, embodiment, and the limits of rationality and systematic theorizing. For the most part this assessment is true of the early and, by now, “classical” works of existentialism, those that first burst upon the philosophical and cultural scene. Circulating Being centers on the later works of several well-known French existentialists (Camus, Marcel, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty) to trace out the development of their existential thinking about (...)
     
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  19. Adrian Cussins (1992). Content, Embodiment, and Objectivity: The Theory of Cognitive Trails. Mind 101 (404):651-88.score: 30.0
  20. T. Scaltsas, David Charles & Mary Louise Gill (eds.) (1994). Unity, Identity, and Explanation in Aristotle's Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    This volume presents fourteen essays by leading figures in the fields of ancient philosophy and contemporary metaphysics, discussing Aristotle's theory of the unity and identity of substances, a topic that remains at the center of metaphysical enquiry. The contributors examine the nature of essences, how they differ from other components of substance, and how they are related to these other components. The central questions discussed are: What does Aristotle mean by "potentiality" and "actuality?" How do these concepts explicate matter (...)
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  21. Sebastian Gardner (1994). Other Minds and Embodiment. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 94:35-52.score: 30.0
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  22. Murray Shanahan (2005). Global Access, Embodiment, and the Conscious Subject. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (12):46-66.score: 30.0
  23. Charles T. Wolfe (2012). Forms of Materialist Embodiment. In Matthew Landers & Brian Muñoz (eds.), Anatomy and the Organization of Knowledge, 1500-1850. Pickering and Chatto.score: 28.0
    The materialist approach to the body is often, if not always understood in ‘mechanistic’ terms, as the view in which the properties unique to organic, living embodied agents are reduced to or described in terms of properties that characterize matter as a whole, which allow of mechanistic explanation. Indeed, from Hobbes and Descartes in the 17th century to the popularity of automata such as Vaucanson’s in the 18th century, this vision of things would seem to be correct. In this paper (...)
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  24. Peter Van Inwagen & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.) (2007). Persons: Human and Divine. Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press ;.score: 24.0
    The nature of persons is a perennial topic of debate in philosophy, currently enjoying something of a revival. In this volume for the first time metaphysical debates about the nature of human persons are brought together with related debates in philosophy of religion and theology. Fifteen specially written essays explore idealist, dualist, and materialist views of persons, discuss specifically Christian conceptions of the value of embodiment, and address four central topics in philosophical theology: incarnation, resurrection, original sin, and the (...)
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  25. Graham Harman (2011). Meillassoux's Virtual Future. Continent 1 (2):78-91.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
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  26. Michael L. Anderson (1997). Content and Comportment: On Embodiment and the Epistemic Availability of the World. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 24.0
    "Content and Comportment argues persuasively that the answer to some long-standing questions in epistemology and metaphysics lies in taking up the neglected question of the role of our bodily activity in establishing connections between representational states?knowledge and belief in particular?and their objects in the world. It takes up these ideas from both current mainstream analytic philosophy?Frege, Dummett, Davidson, Evans?and from mainstream continental work?Heidegger and his commentators and critics?and bings them together successfully in a way that should surprise only those (...)
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  27. Clive Cazeaux (2007). Metaphor and Continental Philosophy: From Kant to Derrida. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Kant and Heidegger on the creation of objectivity -- The power of judgment : metaphor in the structure of Kant's third Critique -- Sensation, categorization, and embodiment : Locke, Merleau-Ponty, and Lakoff and Johnson -- Heidegger and the senses -- Conflicting perspectives : epistemology and ontology in Nietzsche's will to power -- Cutting nature at the joints : metaphor and epistemology in the science wars -- Opening and belonging : between subject and object in Heidegger and Bachelard -- Metaphor (...)
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  28. Friederike Moltmann (forthcoming). Variable Objects and Truthmaking. In Mircea Dumitru (ed.), Metaphysics, Meaning, and Modality. Themes from Kit Fine. Oxford UP.score: 24.0
    This paper will focus on a philosophically significant construction whose semantics brings together two important notions in Kit Fine’s philosophy, the notion of truthmaking and the notion of a variable embodiment, or its extension, namely what I call a ‘variable object’. The analysis of the construction this paper will develop will be based on an account of clausal complements of intensional verbs that is of more general interest, based on truthmaking and the notion of a cognitive product, such as (...)
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  29. Michael O'Donovan-Anderson (1997). Content and Comportment: On Embodiment and the Epistemic Availability of the World. Lanham: Rowman &Amp; Littlefield.score: 24.0
    "Content and Comportment argues persuasively that the answer to some long-standing questions in epistemology and metaphysics lies in taking up the neglected question of the role of our bodily activity in establishing connections between representational states—knowledge and belief in particular—and their objects in the world. It takes up these ideas from both current mainstream analytic philosophy—Frege, Dummett, Davidson, Evans—and from mainstream continental work—Heidegger and his commentators and critics—and bings them together successfully in a way that should surprise only those (...)
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  30. Tom Sparrow (2011). Plasticity and Aesthetic Identity; or, Why We Need a Spinozist Aesthetics. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 40 (40-41):53-74.score: 24.0
    This essay defends the view that, as embodied, our identities are necessarily dependent on the aesthetic environment. Toward this end, it examines the renewal of the concept of sensation (aisthesis) in phenomenology, but then concludes that the methodology and metaphysics of phenomenology must be abandoned in favor of an ontology that sees corporeal identity as generated by the materiality of aesthetic relations. It is suggested that such an ontology is available in the work of Spinoza, which helps break down (...)
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  31. Michael Stöltzner (2003). The Principle of Least Action as the Logical Empiricist's Shibboleth. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 34 (2):285-318.score: 24.0
    The present paper investigates why Logical Empiricists remained silent about one of the most philosophy-laden matters of theoretical physics of the day, the Principle of Least Action (PLA). In the two decades around 1900, the PLA enjoyed a remarkable renaissance as a formal unification of mechanics, electrodynamics, thermodynamics, and relativity theory. Taking Ernst Mach's historico-critical stance, it could be liberated from much of its physico-theological dross. Variational calculus, the mathematical discipline on which the PLA was based, obtained a new rigorous (...)
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  32. Tomis Kapitan, Reason and Flexibility in Islam.score: 24.0
    The role of reason, and its embodiment in philosophical-scientific theorizing, is always a troubling one for religious traditions. The deep emotional needs that religion strives to satisfy seem ever linked to an attitudes of acceptance, belief, or trust, yet, in its theoretical employment, reason functions as a critic as much as it does a creator, and in the special fields of metaphysics and epistemology its critical arrows are sometimes aimed at long-standing cherished beliefs. Understandably, the mere approach to (...)
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  33. M. Stoltzner (2003). The Principle of Least Action as the Logical Empiricist's Shibboleth. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 34 (2):285-318.score: 24.0
    The present paper investigates why logical empiricists remained silent about one of the most philosophy-laden matters of theoretical physics of their day, the principle of least action (PLA). In the two decades around 1900, the PLA enjoyed a remarkable renaissance as a formal unification of mechanics, electrodynamics, thermodynamics, and relativity theory. Taking Ernst Mach's historico-critical stance, it could be liberated from much of its physico-theological dross. Variational calculus, the mathematical discipline on which the PLA was based, obtained a new rigorous (...)
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  34. Eugene Taylor (2010). William James on a Phenomenological Psychology of Immediate Experience: The True Foundation for a Science of Consciousness? History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):119-130.score: 24.0
    Throughout his career, William James defended personal consciousness. In his Principles of Psychology (1890), he declared that psychology is the scientific study of states of consciousness as such and that he intended to presume from the outset that the thinker was the thought. But while writing it, he had been investigating a dynamic psychology of the subconscious, which found a major place in his Gifford Lectures, published as The Varieties of Religious Experience in 1902. This was the clearest statement James (...)
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  35. Chung–Ying Cheng (2002). On the Metaphysical Significance of Ti (Body–Embodiment) in Chinese Philosophy: Benti (Origin–Substance) and Ti–Yong (Substance and Function). Journal of Chinese Philosophy 29 (2):145–161.score: 24.0
  36. Gregory R. Johnson (1997). Shell, Susan Meld. The Embodiment of Reason: Kant on Spirit, Generation, and Community. Review of Metaphysics 50 (4):918-920.score: 24.0
  37. Michael R. Ent & Roy F. Baumeister (2014). Embodied Free Will Beliefs: Some Effects of Physical States on Metaphysical Opinions. Consciousness and Cognition 27:147-154.score: 24.0
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  38. R. P. Doede (2008). Polanyi in the Face of Transhumanism. Tradition and Discovery 35 (1):33-45.score: 24.0
    This essay gives a brief overview of Transhumanism and explores a few of its central ideas in the light of Polanyi’s views about embodiment, Marxism, and reality’s hierarchal order, concluding that although Polanyi would likely appreciate the possibilities of cyborgic augmentation that feature in the Transhumanist route to the posthuman, he would utterly repudiate its metaphysics of disembodied intelligence and its underlying technological determinism.
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  39. E. McGushin (2005). Foucault and the Problem of the Subject. Philosophy and Social Criticism 31 (5-6):623-648.score: 24.0
    This paper examines the relevance of Foucault’s later work to debates in contemporary Continental philosophy concerning the problem of the subject. It shows that Foucault shifts attention away from the history of metaphysics and the metaphysics of the subject to an analysis of the concrete forms of institutional practice and embodiment that shape philosophical discourses. As a result, we are able to see this debate in a different light. In particular, we can grasp the deconstruction of the (...)
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  40. Erich P. Schellhammer (1999). O'Donovan,-Anderson, Michael. Content and Comportment: On Embodiment and the Epistemic Availability of the World. Review of Metaphysics 53 (2):468-470.score: 24.0
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  41. E. A. R. (1966). The Problem of Embodiment. Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):604-605.score: 24.0
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  42. Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida “Passages—from (...)
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  43. Lynne Rudder Baker (2007). Persons and the Metaphysics of Resurrection. Religious Studies 43 (3):333-348.score: 22.0
    Theories of the human person differ greatly in their ability to underwrite a metaphysics of resurrection. This paper compares and contrasts a number of such views in light of the Christian doctrine of resurrection. In a Christian framework, resurrection requires that the same person who exists on earth also exists in an afterlife, that a postmortem person be embodied, and that the existence of a postmortem person is brought about by a miracle. According to my view of persons (the (...)
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  44. Nicholaos Jones (2008). Is Theology Respectable as Metaphysics? Zygon 43 (3):579-592.score: 22.0
    Theology involves inquiry into God's nature, God's purposes, and whether certain experiences or pronouncements come From God. These inquiries are metaphysical, part of theology's concern with the veridicality of signs and realities that are independent from humans. Several research programs concerned with the relation between theology and science aim to secure theology's intellectual standing as a metaphysical discipline by showing that it satisfies criteria that make modern science reputable, on the grounds that modern science embodies contemporary canons of respectability for (...)
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  45. Brandon C. Look (2010). Leibniz's Metaphysics and Metametaphysics: Idealism, Realism, and the Nature of Substance. Philosophy Compass 5 (11):871-879.score: 22.0
    According to the standard view of his metaphysics, Leibniz endorses idealism: the thesis that the world is made up solely of minds or monads and their perceptual and appetitive states. Recently,this view has been challenged by some scholars, who argue that Leibniz can be seen as admitting corporeal substances, that is, animals or embodied souls, into his ontology, and that, therefore, it is false to attribute a strict idealism to him. Subtler accounts suggest that Leibniz begins his philosophical career (...)
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  46. Liam P. Dempsey (2011). 'A Compound Wholly Mortal' : Locke and Newton on the Metaphysics of (Personal) Immortality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):241-264.score: 22.0
    In this paper I consider a cluster of positions which depart from the immortalist and dualist anthropologies of Rene Descartes and Henry More. In particular, I argue that John Locke and Isaac Newton are attracted to a monistic mind-body metaphysics, which while resisting neat characterization, occupies a conceptual space distinct from the dualism of the immortalists, on the one hand, and thoroughgoing materialism of Thomas Hobbes, on the other. They propound a sort of property monism: mind and body are (...)
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  47. Tuomas E. Tahko (2012). In Defence of Aristotelian Metaphysics. In , Contemporary Aristotelian Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press. 26-43.score: 21.0
    When I say that my conception of metaphysics is Aristotelian, or neo-Aristotelian, this may have more to do with Aristotle’s philosophical methodology than his metaphysics, but, as I see it, the core of this Aristotelian conception of metaphysics is the idea that metaphysics is the first philosophy . In what follows I will attempt to clarify what this conception of metaphysics amounts to in the context of some recent discussion on the methodology of metaphysics (...)
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  48. Tuomas E. Tahko (2012). Introduction to 'Contemporary Aristotelian Metaphysics'. In , Contemporary Aristotelian Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press. 1-7.score: 21.0
    Introduction to my 'Contemporary Aristotelian Metaphysics' volume.
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  49. Matthew Davidson & Tony Roy (forthcoming). New Directions in Metaphysics. In Continuum Companion to Metaphysics. Continuum.score: 21.0
    In this paper we set out a Quinean approach to metaphysics. We evaluate Eli Hirsch's and Amie Thomasson's deflationary metaphysics and set out our metametaphysical framework.
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  50. Ásta Kristjana Sveinsdóttir (2011). The Metaphysics of Sex and Gender. In Charlotte Witt (ed.), Feminist Metaphysics. Springer.score: 21.0
    In this chapter I offer an interpretation of Judith Butler’s metaphysics of sex and gender and situate it in the ontological landscape alongside what has long been the received view of sex and gender in the English speaking world, which owes its inspiration to the works of Simone de Beauvoir. I then offer a critique of Butler’s view, as interpreted, and subsequently an original account of sex and gender, according to which both are constructed—or conferred, as I would put (...)
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