Search results for 'Metaphysics embodiment' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Shimon Edelman (2011). The Metaphysics of Embodiment. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (02):321-.score: 126.0
    Shanahan’s eloquently argued version of the global workspace theory fits well into the emerging understanding of consciousness as a computational phenomenon. His disinclination toward metaphysics notwithstanding, Shanahan’s book can also be seen as supportive of a particular metaphysical stance on consciousness — the computational identity theory.
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  2. Jaroslav Trnka (2010). Embodiment and Metaphysics. Deconstruction as Lying Between Good and Bad Dialectic. Filosoficky Casopis 58 (1):57-64.score: 120.0
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  3. Jeremy Walker (1969). Embodiment and Self-Knowledge. Dialogue 8 (June):44-67.score: 78.0
  4. R. M. Zaner (1964). The Problem Of Embodiment; Some Contributions To A Phenomenology Of The Body. The Hague: Nijhoff.score: 78.0
  5. Peter Reynaert (2001). A Phenomenology for Qualia and Naturalizing Embodiment. Communication and Cognition 34 (1-2):139-154.score: 78.0
  6. John Sutton (2006). Introduction: Memory, Embodied Cognition, and the Extended Mind. Philosophical Psychology 19 (3):281-289.score: 58.0
    I introduce the seven papers in this special issue, by Andy Clark, Je´roˆme Dokic, Richard Menary, Jenann Ismael, Sue Campbell, Doris McIlwain, and Mark Rowlands. This paper explains the motivation for an alliance between the sciences of memory and the extended mind hypothesis. It examines in turn the role of worldly, social, and internalized forms of scaffolding to memory and cognition, and also highlights themes relating to affect, agency, and individual differences.
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  7. Klaus Mainzer (2005). The Embodied Mind: On Computational, Evolutionary, and Philosophical Interpretations of Cognition. Synthesis Philosophica 2 (40):389-406.score: 58.0
  8. Anton Lethin (2002). How Do We Embody Intentionality? In Martin Hahn & B. Ramberg (eds.), Reflections and Replies: Essays on the Philosophy of Tyler Burge. Mit Press. 36-44.score: 58.0
  9. Shaun Gallagher (2005). How the Body Shapes the Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 54.0
    How the Body Shapes the Mind is an interdisciplinary work that addresses philosophical questions by appealing to evidence found in experimental psychology, neuroscience, studies of pathologies, and developmental psychology. There is a growing consensus across these disciplines that the contribution of embodiment to cognition is inescapable. Because this insight has been developed across a variety of disciplines, however, there is still a need to develop a common vocabulary that is capable of integrating discussions of brain mechanisms in neuroscience, behavioral (...)
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  10. Jack Reynolds (2004). Merleau-Ponty and Derrida: Intertwining Embodiment and Alterity. Ohio.score: 54.0
    While there have been many essays devoted to comparing the work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty with that of Jacques Derrida, there has been no sustained book-length treatment of these two French philosophers. Additionally, many of the essays presuppose an oppositional relationship between them, and between phenomenology and deconstruction more generally. -/- Jack Reynolds systematically explores their relationship by analyzing each philosopher in terms of two important and related issues—embodiment and alterity. Focusing on areas with which they are not commonly associated (...)
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  11. Christine Battersby (1998). The Phenomenal Woman: Feminist Metaphysics and the Patterns of Identity. Routledge.score: 54.0
    Christine Battersby rethinks questions of embodiment, essence, sameness and difference, self and "other", patriarchy and power. Using analyses of Kant, Adorno, Irigaray, Butler, Kierkegaard and Deleuze, she challenges those who argue that a feminist metaphysics is a a contradiction in terms. This book explores place for a metaphysics of fluidity in the current debates concerning postmodernism, feminism and identity politics.
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  12. Alex Levine (2011). Epistemic Objects as Interactive Loci. Axiomathes 21 (1):57-66.score: 54.0
    Contemporary process metaphysics has achieved a number of important results, most significantly in accounting for emergence, a problem on which substance metaphysics has foundered since Plato. It also faces trenchant problems of its own, among them the related problems of boundaries and individuation. Historically, the quest for ontology may thus have been largely responsible for the persistence of substance metaphysics. But as Plato was well aware, an ontology of substantial things raises serious, perhaps insurmountable problems for any (...)
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  13. Thomas W. Busch (1999). Circulating Being: From Embodiment to Incorporation: Essays on Late Existentialism. Fordham University Press.score: 54.0
    Existentialism has come to be identified as a critical, reactionary way of thinking, celebrating the individual, freedom, embodiment, and the limits of rationality and systematic theorizing. For the most part this assessment is true of the early and, by now, “classical” works of existentialism, those that first burst upon the philosophical and cultural scene. Circulating Being centers on the later works of several well-known French existentialists (Camus, Marcel, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty) to trace out the development of their existential thinking about (...)
     
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  14. Søren Overgaard (2006). The Problem of Other Minds: Wittgenstein's Phenomenological Perspective. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):53-73.score: 50.0
    This paper discusses Wittgenstein's take on the problem of other minds. In opposition to certain widespread views that I collect under the heading of the “No Problem Interpretation,” I argue that Wittgenstein does address some problem of other minds. However, Wittgenstein's problem is not the traditional epistemological problem of other minds; rather, it is more reminiscent of the issue of intersubjectivity as it emerges in the writings of phenomenologists such as Husserl, Merleau-Ponty, and Heidegger. This is one sense in which (...)
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  15. Douglas C. Long (1977). Disembodied Existence, Physicalism, and the Mind-Body Problem. Philosophical Studies 31 (May):307-316.score: 50.0
    The idea that we may continue to exist in a bodiless condition after our death has long played an important role in beliefs about immortality, ultimate rewards and punishments, the transmigration of souls, and the like. There has also been long and heated disagreement about whether the idea of disembodied existence even makes sense, let alone whether anybody can or does survive dissolution of his material form. It may seem doubtful that anything new could be added to the debate at (...)
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  16. Richard Menary (2006). Radical Enactivism: Intentionality, Phenomenology and Narrative: Focus on the Philosophy of Daniel D. Hutto. Amsterdam: J Benjamins.score: 48.0
    This collection is a much-needed remedy to the confusion about which varieties of enactivism are robust yet viable rejections of traditional representionalism...
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  17. Max O. Hocutt (1974). Armstrong and Strawson on 'Disembodied Existence'. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 35 (September):46-59.score: 48.0
  18. Eric Saidel (1999). Critical Notice of Andy Clark, Being There. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (2):299-317.score: 48.0
     
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  19. Adrian Cussins (1992). Content, Embodiment, and Objectivity: The Theory of Cognitive Trails. Mind 101 (404):651-88.score: 42.0
  20. Sebastian Gardner (1994). Other Minds and Embodiment. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 94:35-52.score: 42.0
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  21. Murray Shanahan (2005). Global Access, Embodiment, and the Conscious Subject. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (12):46-66.score: 42.0
  22. Chung–Ying Cheng (2002). On the Metaphysical Significance of Ti (Body–Embodiment) in Chinese Philosophy: Benti (Origin–Substance) and Ti–Yong (Substance and Function). Journal of Chinese Philosophy 29 (2):145–161.score: 40.0
  23. Michael R. Ent & Roy F. Baumeister (2014). Embodied Free Will Beliefs: Some Effects of Physical States on Metaphysical Opinions. Consciousness and Cognition 27:147-154.score: 40.0
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  24. T. Scaltsas, David Charles & Mary Louise Gill (eds.) (1994). Unity, Identity, and Explanation in Aristotle's Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.score: 38.0
    This volume presents fourteen essays by leading figures in the fields of ancient philosophy and contemporary metaphysics, discussing Aristotle's theory of the unity and identity of substances, a topic that remains at the center of metaphysical enquiry. The contributors examine the nature of essences, how they differ from other components of substance, and how they are related to these other components. The central questions discussed are: What does Aristotle mean by "potentiality" and "actuality?" How do these concepts explicate matter (...)
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  25. Charles T. Wolfe (2012). Forms of Materialist Embodiment. In Matthew Landers & Brian Muñoz (eds.), Anatomy and the Organization of Knowledge, 1500-1850. Pickering and Chatto.score: 36.0
    The materialist approach to the body is often, if not always understood in ‘mechanistic’ terms, as the view in which the properties unique to organic, living embodied agents are reduced to or described in terms of properties that characterize matter as a whole, which allow of mechanistic explanation. Indeed, from Hobbes and Descartes in the 17th century to the popularity of automata such as Vaucanson’s in the 18th century, this vision of things would seem to be correct. In this paper (...)
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  26. Michael L. Anderson (1997). Content and Comportment: On Embodiment and the Epistemic Availability of the World. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 36.0
    "Content and Comportment argues persuasively that the answer to some long-standing questions in epistemology and metaphysics lies in taking up the neglected question of the role of our bodily activity in establishing connections between representational states?knowledge and belief in particular?and their objects in the world. It takes up these ideas from both current mainstream analytic philosophy?Frege, Dummett, Davidson, Evans?and from mainstream continental work?Heidegger and his commentators and critics?and bings them together successfully in a way that should surprise only those (...)
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  27. Michael O'Donovan-Anderson (1997). Content and Comportment: On Embodiment and the Epistemic Availability of the World. Lanham: Rowman &Amp; Littlefield.score: 36.0
    "Content and Comportment argues persuasively that the answer to some long-standing questions in epistemology and metaphysics lies in taking up the neglected question of the role of our bodily activity in establishing connections between representational states—knowledge and belief in particular—and their objects in the world. It takes up these ideas from both current mainstream analytic philosophy—Frege, Dummett, Davidson, Evans—and from mainstream continental work—Heidegger and his commentators and critics—and bings them together successfully in a way that should surprise only those (...)
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  28. Gregory R. Johnson (1997). Shell, Susan Meld. The Embodiment of Reason: Kant on Spirit, Generation, and Community. Review of Metaphysics 50 (4):918-920.score: 36.0
  29. Erich P. Schellhammer (1999). O'Donovan,-Anderson, Michael. Content and Comportment: On Embodiment and the Epistemic Availability of the World. Review of Metaphysics 53 (2):468-470.score: 36.0
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  30. E. A. R. (1966). The Problem of Embodiment. Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):604-605.score: 36.0
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  31. Lynne Rudder Baker (2007). Persons and the Metaphysics of Resurrection. Religious Studies 43 (3):333-348.score: 30.0
    Theories of the human person differ greatly in their ability to underwrite a metaphysics of resurrection. This paper compares and contrasts a number of such views in light of the Christian doctrine of resurrection. In a Christian framework, resurrection requires that the same person who exists on earth also exists in an afterlife, that a postmortem person be embodied, and that the existence of a postmortem person is brought about by a miracle. According to my view of persons (the (...)
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  32. Nicholaos Jones (2008). Is Theology Respectable as Metaphysics? Zygon 43 (3):579-592.score: 30.0
    Theology involves inquiry into God's nature, God's purposes, and whether certain experiences or pronouncements come From God. These inquiries are metaphysical, part of theology's concern with the veridicality of signs and realities that are independent from humans. Several research programs concerned with the relation between theology and science aim to secure theology's intellectual standing as a metaphysical discipline by showing that it satisfies criteria that make modern science reputable, on the grounds that modern science embodies contemporary canons of respectability for (...)
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  33. Brandon C. Look (2010). Leibniz's Metaphysics and Metametaphysics: Idealism, Realism, and the Nature of Substance. Philosophy Compass 5 (11):871-879.score: 30.0
    According to the standard view of his metaphysics, Leibniz endorses idealism: the thesis that the world is made up solely of minds or monads and their perceptual and appetitive states. Recently,this view has been challenged by some scholars, who argue that Leibniz can be seen as admitting corporeal substances, that is, animals or embodied souls, into his ontology, and that, therefore, it is false to attribute a strict idealism to him. Subtler accounts suggest that Leibniz begins his philosophical career (...)
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  34. Liam P. Dempsey (2011). 'A Compound Wholly Mortal' : Locke and Newton on the Metaphysics of (Personal) Immortality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):241-264.score: 30.0
    In this paper I consider a cluster of positions which depart from the immortalist and dualist anthropologies of Rene Descartes and Henry More. In particular, I argue that John Locke and Isaac Newton are attracted to a monistic mind-body metaphysics, which while resisting neat characterization, occupies a conceptual space distinct from the dualism of the immortalists, on the one hand, and thoroughgoing materialism of Thomas Hobbes, on the other. They propound a sort of property monism: mind and body are (...)
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  35. Tuomas E. Tahko (2012). In Defence of Aristotelian Metaphysics. In , Contemporary Aristotelian Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press. 26-43.score: 27.0
    When I say that my conception of metaphysics is Aristotelian, or neo-Aristotelian, this may have more to do with Aristotle’s philosophical methodology than his metaphysics, but, as I see it, the core of this Aristotelian conception of metaphysics is the idea that metaphysics is the first philosophy . In what follows I will attempt to clarify what this conception of metaphysics amounts to in the context of some recent discussion on the methodology of metaphysics (...)
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  36. Tuomas E. Tahko (2012). Introduction to 'Contemporary Aristotelian Metaphysics'. In , Contemporary Aristotelian Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press. 1-7.score: 27.0
    Introduction to my 'Contemporary Aristotelian Metaphysics' volume.
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  37. Matthew Davidson & Tony Roy (forthcoming). New Directions in Metaphysics. In Continuum Companion to Metaphysics. Continuum.score: 27.0
    In this paper we set out a Quinean approach to metaphysics. We evaluate Eli Hirsch's and Amie Thomasson's deflationary metaphysics and set out our metametaphysical framework.
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  38. Ásta Kristjana Sveinsdóttir (2011). The Metaphysics of Sex and Gender. In Charlotte Witt (ed.), Feminist Metaphysics. Springer.score: 27.0
    In this chapter I offer an interpretation of Judith Butler’s metaphysics of sex and gender and situate it in the ontological landscape alongside what has long been the received view of sex and gender in the English speaking world, which owes its inspiration to the works of Simone de Beauvoir. I then offer a critique of Butler’s view, as interpreted, and subsequently an original account of sex and gender, according to which both are constructed—or conferred, as I would put (...)
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  39. Jason Costanzo (forthcoming). Cartesian Doubt and Metaphysics. In Proceedings of the Fifth World Conference in Metaphysics.score: 27.0
    Since Descartes, the nature of doubt has played a central role in the development of metaphysics both positively and negatively. Despite this fact, there has been very little discussion centering round the specific nature of doubt which led, for example, to the Cartesian discovery of the cogito. Certainly, the role of doubt has been well recognized: through doubt Descartes arrives at his indubitable first principle. But what can it mean to doubt the existence of the sensible world? This would (...)
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  40. Heather Dyke (ed.) (2008). Metaphysics and the Representational Fallacy. Routledge.score: 27.0
    In this refreshingly original and accessible investigation into the nature of metaphysics, Heather Dyke argues that for too long philosophy has suffered from a language fixation. Where this language fixation leads philosophers to reason badly, she calls it the ‘‘representational fallacy’’. She illustrates the various ways it can lead philosophers astray and argues that metaphysics can be better done without it. She discusses the philosophy of time as an illustration of how a metaphysical debate about the nature of (...)
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  41. E. J. Lowe (2011). The Rationality of Metaphysics. Synthese 178 (1):99-109.score: 24.0
    In this paper, it is argued that metaphysics, conceived as an inquiry into the ultimate nature of mind-independent reality, is a rationally indispensable intellectual discipline, with the a priori science of formal ontology at its heart. It is maintained that formal ontology, properly understood, is not a mere exercise in conceptual analysis, because its primary objective is a normative one, being nothing less than the attempt to grasp adequately the essences of things, both actual and possible, with a view (...)
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  42. Peter G. Jones (2009). From Metaphysics to Mysticism. Dissertation, Pathways School of Philosophyscore: 24.0
    Mysticism claims of its logical scheme that it is Euclidean, that from its first axiom or principle the remainder of its doctrine follows, but it makes this claim in so many languages and in such a variety of obscure and self-contradictory ways that it is difficult to discern how this could be possible, and it is rarely considered a plausible claim in metaphysics. I believe it is plausible, and in this essay I try to explain why. -/- .
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  43. Tim Maudlin (2007/2009). The Metaphysics Within Physics. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    A modest proposal concerning laws, counterfactuals, and explanations - - Why be Humean? -- Suggestions from physics for deep metaphysics -- On the passing of time -- Causation, counterfactuals, and the third factor -- The whole ball of wax -- Epilogue : a remark on the method of metaphysics.
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  44. Michael J. Loux & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.) (2003). The Oxford Handbook of Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The Oxford Handbook of Metaphysics offers the most authoritative and compelling guide to this diverse and fertile field of philosophy. Twenty-four of the world's most distinguished specialists provide brand-new essays about 'what there is': what kinds of things there are, and what relations hold among entities falling under various categories. They give the latest word on such topics as identity, modality, time, causation, persons and minds, freedom, and vagueness. The Handbook's unrivaled breadth and depth make it the definitive reference (...)
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  45. Peter van Inwagen, Metaphysics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    In this classic, exciting, and thoughtful text, Metaphysics , Peter van Inwagen examines three profound questions: What are the most general features of the world? Why is there a world? and What is the place of human beings in the world? Metaphysics introduces to readers the curious notion that is metaphysics, how it is conceived both historically and currently. The author's work can serve either as a textbook in a university course on metaphysics or as an (...)
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  46. Tuomas E. Tahko (2008). The Aristotelian Method and Aristotelian Metaphysics. In Patricia Hanna (ed.), An Anthology of Philosophical Studies. ATINER.score: 24.0
    In this paper I examine what exactly is ‘Aristotelian metaphysics’. My inquiry into Aristotelian metaphysics should not be understood to be so much concerned with the details of Aristotle's metaphysics. I am are rather concerned with his methodology of metaphysics, although a lot of the details of his metaphysics survive in contemporary discussion as well. This warrants an investigation into the methodological aspects of Aristotle's metaphysics. The key works that we will be looking at (...)
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  47. James Maclaurin & Heather Dyke (2012). What is Analytic Metaphysics For? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (2):291-306.score: 24.0
    We divide analytic metaphysics into naturalistic and non-naturalistic metaphysics. The latter we define as any philosophical theory that makes some ontological (as opposed to conceptual) claim, where that ontological claim has no observable consequences. We discuss further features of non-naturalistic metaphysics, including its methodology of appealing to intuition, and we explain the way in which we take it to be discontinuous with science. We outline and criticize Ladyman and Ross's 2007 epistemic argument against non-naturalistic metaphysics. We (...)
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  48. E. J. Lowe (2008). New Directions in Metaphysics and Ontology. Axiomathes 18 (3):273-288.score: 24.0
    A personal view is presented of how metaphysics and ontology stand at the beginning of the twenty-first century, in the light of developments during the twentieth. It is argued that realist metaphysics, with serious ontology at its heart, has a promising future, provided that its adherents devote some time and effort to countering the influences of both its critics and its false friends.
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  49. Peter G. Jones (2012). Is Metaphysics a Waste of Time? Philosophy Pathways (171).score: 24.0
    The view that metaphysics is a waste of time appears to be gaining in popularity with every passing day. It is held openly by many scientists and even by many philosophers. I argue here that this is a consequence of the way metaphysics is often done, the futility of a certain approach to it, and not a reason to suppose that there is no useful knowledge to be acquired in metaphysics.
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  50. Alyssa Ney (2012). Neo-Positivist Metaphysics. Philosophical Studies 160 (1):53-78.score: 24.0
    Some philosophers argue that many contemporary debates in metaphysics are “illegitimate,” “shallow,” or “trivial,” and that “contemporary analytic metaphysics, a professional activity engaged in by some extremely intelligent and morally serious people, fails to qualify as part of the enlightened pursuit of objective truth, and should be discontinued” (Ladyman and Ross, Every thing must go: Metaphysics naturalized , 2007 ). Many of these critics are explicit about their sympathies with Rudolf Carnap and his circle, calling themselves ‘neo-positivists’ (...)
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