Search results for 'Meteorologica' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    In Aristotelis Meteorologica (2004). Index locorum. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy: Winter 2004 27 (4):335.
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  2.  22
    Craig Martin (2002). Francisco Vallés and the Renaissance Reinterpretation of Aristotle's Meteorologica IV as a Medical Text. Early Science and Medicine 7 (1):1-30.
    In this paper I describe the context and goals of Francisco Vallés' In IV librum Meteorologicorum commentaria . Vallés' work stands as a landmark because it interprets a work of Aristotle's natural philosophy specifically for medical doctors and medical theory. Vallés' commentary is representative of new understandings of Galenic-Hippocratic medi-cine that emerged as a result of expanding textual knowledge. These approaches are evident in a number of sixteenth-century commentaries on Meteorologica IV; in particular the works of Pietro Pomponazzi, Lodovico (...)
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  3.  2
    H. B. Gottschalk (1961). The Authorship of Meteorologica, Book IV. Classical Quarterly 11 (1-2):67-.
    The so-called fourth book of Aristotle's Meteorologica is not about meteorological phenomena at all. It describes the formation out of the four elements of ‘homoeomerous’ substances, by which are meant minerals such as stones and metals, and organic substances like flesh, skin, and hair, and the changes they can undergo under the influence of heat, cold, and moisture. Most commentators, ancient and modern, have seen that it has very little to do with the first three books of the (...) to which it is attached, and Alexander suggested that it should be placed after the second book de Generation et Corruptione. (shrink)
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  4.  8
    Brad Berman (2015). ARISTOTLE, METEOROLOGICA. M. Wilson Structure and Method in Aristotle's Meteorologica. A More Disorderly Nature. Pp. Xvi + 304, Figs. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Cased, £65, US$99. ISBN: 978-1-107-04257-5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 65 (2):383–384.
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  5.  9
    Aristotle, Meteorologica.
  6.  5
    Lucian Petrescu (2014). Hylomorphism Versus the Theory of Elements in Late Aristotelianism: Péter Pázmány and the Sixteenth-Century Exegesis of Meteorologica IV. Vivarium 52 (1-2):147-172.
  7.  3
    Malcolm Wilson (2009). A Somewhat Disorderly Nature: Unity in Aristotle's Meteorologica I-III. Apeiron 42 (1):63-88.
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  8.  17
    Edward Hussey (1986). Aristotle's Meteorologica Pierre Louis: Aristote, Météorologiques. (Collection Budé.) 2 Vols. Pp. 1 + 121, 160; 9 Diagrams. Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1982. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 36 (02):213-216.
  9.  3
    Friedrich Solmsen (1985). Citations in Their Bearing on the Origin of 'Aristotle' Meteorologica IV. Hermes 113 (4):448-459.
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  10.  5
    St George Stock (1921). Aristotle's Four Books of Meteorologica Aristotle's Four Books of Meteorologica. Revised, with Index of Words, by F. H. Fobes. Printed at the Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., U.S.A., 1919. Price 15s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 35 (3-4):69-.
  11.  8
    H. Rackham (1925). Webster's Translation of the Meteorologica Works of Aristotle Translated Into English: Meteorologica. By E. W. Webster. I Vol. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1923. Paper, 7s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (1-2):27-28.
  12.  10
    Edward Hussey (1986). Aristotle's Meteorologica. The Classical Review 36 (02):213-.
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  13.  7
    D. J. Allan (1937). V. C. B. Coutant: Alexander of Aphrodisias: Commentary on Book IV of Aristotle's Meteorologica (English Translation with Introduction and Notes). Pp. 99. New York: Columbia University, 1936. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (05):201-.
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  14.  7
    D. J. Furley (1954). Aristotle's Meteorologica H. D. P. Lee: Aristotle, Meteorologica. With an English Translation. (Loeb Classical Library.) Pp. Xxx + 433; 2 Maps, Diagrams. London: Heinemann, 1952. Cloth, 15s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 4 (02):117-119.
  15. Carmela Baffioni & Aristotle (1981). Il Iv Libro Dei "Meteorologica" di Aristotele. Bibliopolis.
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  16.  1
    Lynn Thorndike (1954). Oresme and Fourteenth Century Commentaries on the Meteorologica. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 45:145-152.
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  17.  6
    D. J. Furley (1954). Aristotle's Meteorologica. The Classical Review 4 (02):117-.
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  18.  4
    Brigid E. Harry (1971). A Defence of Aristotle, Meteorologica, 3, 375a6ff. Classical Quarterly 21 (02):397-.
    Aristotle believed that there were actually only three colours present in the rainbow, : of these, the first is produced by the dulling of white light when it is reflected in or obscured by a dark medium such as smoke, cloud, or water, and exemplified in the redness of the sun as seen through haze around the horizon. Successive failures of sight weaken the colour further, first to πράσινov and then to άλoυργóν. Between the first two colours a fourth, ξανθóν, (...)
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  19.  1
    Burkhard Mojsisch (2013). Georgius Pachymeres, Philosophia V: Commentary in Aristotle’s Meteorologica. [REVIEW] Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 16 (1):286-286.
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  20. Charles Burnett (2011). Meteorologica. Translatio Guillelmi de Morbeka. Annals of Science 68 (4):579-580.
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  21. Niccolo Cabeo, Aristotle & Heredi di Francesco Corbelletti (1646). Nicolai Cabei Ferrarensis Societatis Iesu in Quatuor Libros Meteorologicorum Aristotelis Commentaria, Et Quaestiones Quatuor Tomis Compræensa Quibus Non Solum Meteorologica, Tum Ex Antiquorum Dictis, Tum Maxime Ex Singularum Rerum Experimentis Explicantur Sed Etiam Vniuersa Fere Experimentalis Philosophia Exponitur. Multa Præerea Hactenus Vix Pertracta Accurate Examinantur Prout Sequens Index Quætionum Indicat. Typis Hæedum Francisci Corbelletti.
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  22. Ingemar Düring (1944). Aristotle's Chemical Treatise Meteorologica, Book Iv. Elanders Boktryckeri Aktiebolag.
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  23. Andrea Falcon (2015). Malcolm Wilson, Structure and Method in Aristotle’s Meteorologica: A More Disorderly Nature. Rhizomata 3 (2):221-225.
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  24. Craig Martin (2015). Book Review: Structure and Method in Aristotle’s Meteorologica: A More Disorderly Nature, Written by Malcolm Wilson. [REVIEW] Early Science and Medicine 20 (1):77-79.
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  25. C. Martin (2004). Crisdna Viano (ed.). Aristoteles chemicus: II IV libro dei Meteorologica nella tradizione antica e medievale. Early Science and Medicine 9 (1):44-45.
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  26. A. E. Taylor (1924). Aristotle, Works of, Trans. Into English: Meteorologica, Trans. By E. W. Webster. [REVIEW] Mind 33:95.
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  27. Lynn Thorndike (1955). More Questions on the Meteorologica. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 46:357-360.
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  28. Lynn Thorndike (1955). More Questions on the Meteorologica. Isis 46 (4):357-360.
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  29. Lynn Thorndike (1954). Oresme and Fourteenth Century Commentaries on the Meteorologica. Isis 45 (2):145-152.
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  30. Shane Duarte (2007). Aristotle's Theology and its Relation to the Science of Being Qua Being. Apeiron 40 (3):267-318.
    The paper proposes a novel understanding of how Aristotle’s theoretical works complement each other in such a way as to form a genuine system, and this with the immediate (and ostensibly central) aim of addressing a longstanding question regarding Aristotle’s ‘first philosophy’—namely, is Aristotle’s first philosophy a contribution to theology, or to the science of being in general? Aristotle himself seems to suggest that it is in some ways both, but how this can be is a very difficult question. My (...)
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  31.  11
    Qiong Zhang (2009). From "Dragonology" to Meteorology: Aristotelian Natural Philosophy and the Beginning of the Decline of the Dragon in China. Early Science and Medicine 14 (1):340-368.
    The cult of the dragon in China, which expressed itself not only in the ritual sacrifices to the dragon kings during drought and floods but also in the rationalization of the dragon's power to make rain by many serious thinkers from diverse intellectual persuasions, was first subjected to sustained criticism during the early modern era as part of an "enlightenment" drive against popular cults and "superstitions" led by some of the Jesuit-inspired Chinese scholars. This paper examines how these critics drew (...)
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  32.  24
    Jacqueline Hamesse (2003). Les Instruments De Travail Philosophiques Médiévaux. Témoins De La Reception D'Aristote. Early Science and Medicine 8 (4):371-386.
    It is possible to study the reception of Aristotle's natural philosophy by means of the various tools that were used by intellectuals during the thirteenth century. This type of literature is often forgotten. Four samples are taken here to illustrate the interest of such works, and the information that we can extract from them. The examples are the sermons by Anton of Padua ; an encyclopedia composed by Arnold of Saxony during the second quarter of the thirteenth century, which includes (...)
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  33.  14
    Patrick Hutchings (2012). 'The Origin of the Work of Art': Heidegger. Sophia 51 (4):465-478.
    Professor Max Charlesworth and I worked, at Deakin University, on a course, 'Understanding Art'. Max was interested in the Social History of Art and in art as: 'giving form to mere matter'. Here 'form' might be read as 'lucid', 'exemplary', 'beautiful' etcetera. I am an Aristotle Poetics 4 man '… imitating something with the utmost veracity in a picture', and an Aristotle and John Cage man: 'Art is the imitation of nature in the manner of operation. Or a net'. (Cage) (...)
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  34.  14
    D. E. Eichholz (1949). Aristotle's Theory of the Formation of Metals and Minerals. Classical Quarterly 43 (3-4):141-.
    The Twofold Exhalation. Aristotle explains in Book I of the Meteorologica that the heat of the sun causes the earth to give off an exhalation , which is of two kinds. One kind, derived from the moisture within the earth and on its surface, is a moist vapour , ‘potentially like water’ ; the other, which comes from the earth itself, is hot, dry, and smoky, highly combustible ‘like a fuel’ , ‘the most inflammable of substances’ , ‘potentially like (...)
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  35.  4
    J. J. Hall (1977). Seneca as a Source For Earlier Thought (Especially Meteorology). Classical Quarterly 27 (02):409-.
    In his philosophical works Seneca often refers to the views of his predecessors, and sometimes is the sole or the earliest authority for what he says about them, which makes it important for the student of earlier thought to know whether what he says is likely to be true. This I believe can be roughly assessed–and this paper is an attempt to do it–by considering how reliable he is in places where he can be checked: that is, in places where (...)
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  36. Josep Puig Montada (2000). Abu Abd ar-Rahman Ibn Tahir. Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval 7:181-188.
    En el artículo publicado con dicho título en el número anterior de esta Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval, 6 : 217-232, empezaba el apartado dedicado a los miembros del círculo próximo a Averroes con la mención de Ibn Tufail . Debía haber incluido allí una mención a otro personaje, amigo de Averroes y relacionado también con Ibn Tufail : Abû' Abd ar-Ramhân lbn Tâhir , al que Averroes menciona al final del libro lI de su paráfrasis, expositio media, a los (...)
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  37.  2
    J. R. Hamilton (1971). Alexander and the Aral. Classical Quarterly 21 (01):106-.
    In his illuminating discussion of ‘the Caspian question’ Sir William Tarn, basing his case mainly on Aristotle, Meteorologica, 2. 1. 10 and Strabo, 11. 7. 4, argued that Alexander knew of the existence of the Aral Sea. Tarn's conclusion, however, was soon challenged by Professor Lionel Pearson, who disagreed in particular with Tarn's interpretation of the passage in Strabo. But, although he undoubtedly succeeds in showing that some of Tarn's arguments are not valid, Pearson fails, as it seems to (...)
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  38.  5
    Roshdi Rashed (2001). Al-Quhi: From Meteorology to Astronomy. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 11 (2):153-156.
    Among the phenomena examined in the Meteorologica , some, although they are sublunar, are too distant to be accessible to direct study. To remedy this situation, it was necessary to develop procedures and methods which could allow observation, and above all the geometrical control of observations. The eventual result of this research was to detach the phenomenon under consideration from meteorology, and to insert it within optics or astronomy. Abū Sahl al-Qūhī , composed a treatise on shooting stars in (...)
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  39. Carmela Baffioni (ed.) (2013). Epistles of the Brethren of Purity: On the Natural Sciences: An Arabic Critical Edition and English Translation of Epistles 15-21. Oxford University Press in Association with the Institute of Ismaili Studies.
    This is the first critical edition of Epistles 15-21 of the Brethren of Purity, which explore the natural sciences and correspond to Aristotle's great works on philosophy of nature. Along with Epistle 22, "On Animals," Epistles 15-21 correspond to the corpus of Aristotle's great works on the philosophy of nature: Physica , De caelo , De generatione et corruption , and Meteorologica I-III . Meteorologica IV may correspond to Epistle 19 "On Minerals" (though no such Aristotelian work has (...)
     
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  40. Eric Lewis (1989). Body, Matter and Mixture: The Metaphysical Foundations of Ancient Chemistry. Dissertation, University of Illinois at Chicago
    The history of ancient chemistry has been virtually ignored. I examine the foundations of the chemical theories of the Peripatetics and Stoics, in an attempt to glean the motivations for their chemical theories, and how these theories relate to their greater natural philosophies. This involves a detailed examination of ancient theories of mixture. I attempt to relate Aristotle's theory of mixture to his theories of substantial change, the elements and matter. This entails a rejection of the notion of prime matter, (...)
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