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Micah B. Goldwater [4]Micah Goldwater [2]
  1. Benjamin M. Rottman, Dedre Gentner & Micah B. Goldwater (2012). Causal Systems Categories: Differences in Novice and Expert Categorization of Causal Phenomena. Cognitive Science 36 (5):919-932.
    We investigated the understanding of causal systems categories—categories defined by common causal structure rather than by common domain content—among college students. We asked students who were either novices or experts in the physical sciences to sort descriptions of real-world phenomena that varied in their causal structure (e.g., negative feedback vs. causal chain) and in their content domain (e.g., economics vs. biology). Our hypothesis was that there would be a shift from domain-based sorting to causal sorting with increasing expertise in the (...)
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  2. Micah B. Goldwater, Arthur B. Markman & C. Hunt Stilwell (2011). The Empirical Case for Role-Governed Categories. Cognition 118 (3):359-376.
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  3. Micah B. Goldwater, Marc T. Tomlinson, Catharine H. Echols & Bradley C. Love (2011). Structural Priming as Structure-Mapping: Children Use Analogies From Previous Utterances to Guide Sentence Production. Cognitive Science 35 (1):156-170.
    What mechanisms underlie children’s language production? Structural priming—the repetition of sentence structure across utterances—is an important measure of the developing production system. We propose its mechanism in children is the same as may underlie analogical reasoning: structure-mapping. Under this view, structural priming is the result of making an analogy between utterances, such that children map semantic and syntactic structure from previous to future utterances. Because the ability to map relationally complex structures develops with age, younger children are less successful than (...)
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  4. Micah B. Goldwater, Noah D. Goodman, Stephen Wechsler & Gregory L. Murphy (2009). Relational and Role-Governed Categories: Views From Psychology, Computational Modeling, and Linguistics. In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
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  5. Arthur B. Markman, Serge Blok, John Dennis, Micah Goldwater, Kyungil Kim, Jeff Laux, Lisa Narvaez & Jon Rein (2006). Money and Motivational Activation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):190-190.
    Different aspects of people's interactions with money are best conceptualized using the drug and tool theories. The key question is when these models of money are most likely to guide behavior. We suggest that the Drug Theory characterizes motivationally active uses of money and that the Tool Theory characterizes behavior in motivationally cool situations. (Published Online April 5 2006).
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  6. Arthur B. Markman, Serge Blok, John Dennis, Micah Goldwater, Kyungil Kim, Jeff Laux, Lisa Narvaez & Eric Taylor (2005). Culture and Individual Differences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):831-831.
    Tests of economic theory often focus on choice outcomes and find significant individual differences in these outcomes. This variability may mask universal psychological processes that lead to different choices because of differences across cultures in the information people have available when making decisions. On this view, decision making research within and across cultures must focus on the processes underlying choice.
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