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Michael B. Green [9]Michael Barry Green [1]
  1. Michael B. Green & Daniel Wikler (2009). Brain Death and Personal Identity. In John P. Lizza (ed.), Philosophy and Public Affairs. Johns Hopkins University Press 105 - 133.
  2. Michael B. Green (1983). Book Review:Happiness. Elizabeth Telfer. [REVIEW] Ethics 93 (2):395-.
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  3. Michael B. Green (1982). Telfer, Elizabeth, "Happiness". [REVIEW] Ethics 93:395.
     
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  4. Michael B. Green (1981). May We Forget Our Minds for the Moment? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):107.
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  5. Michael B. Green (1981). Smart's Mixed Strategy. Philosophical Studies 39 (4):383 - 391.
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  6. Michael B. Green (1981). Splitting Self-Concern. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 62 (3):213.
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  7. Michael B. Green (1979). The Grain Objection. Philosophy of Science 46 (4):559-589.
    Many philosophers, both past and present, object to materialism not from any romantic anti-scientific bent, but from sheer inability to understand the thesis. It seems utterly inconceivable to some that qualia should exist in a world which is entirely material. This paper investigates the grain objection, a much neglected argument which purports to prove that sensations could not be brain events. Three versions are examined in great detail. The plausibility of the first version is shown to depend crucially on whether (...)
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  8. Michael B. Green (1979). Harris's Modest Proposal. Philosophy 54 (209):400 - 406.
    In ‘The Survival Lottery’ John Harris raises the following issue. Suppose it is possible for physicians to save the lives of two patients, Y and Z, otherwise doomed to die through no fault of their own, by taking the life of a third person, P, and using various of his organs appropriately for transplants. To provide a fair and impartial way of selecting the organ donor, a survival lottery is proposed for the society. This lottery randomly selects an organ donor (...)
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  9. Michael B. Green (1978). Some Difference is Enough Difference. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):356.
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