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Profile: Michael Barnwell (Niagara University)
  1.  12
    Michael Barnwell (2015). The Problem with Aquinas’s Original Discovery. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 89 (2):277-291.
    Jacques Maritain asserted that Aquinas’s explanation of sin’s origin is “one of the most original of his philosophical discoveries.” In this explanation, Aquinas traces the origin of sin back to the will’s defect of failing to consider or use the rule of divine law. To succeed, Aquinas must show how this defect is both voluntarily caused by the agent and non-culpable despite its serving as the origin for sin. (If it were culpable, a non-explanatory regress would ensue.) Aquinas’s “original” solution (...)
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  2.  34
    Michael Barnwell (2010). Aquinas's Two Different Accounts of Akrasia. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (1):49-67.
    Aquinas’s analyses of akrasia can be divided into two: the discussions in his theological works and his Ethics commentary. The latter has sometimes been regarded as merely repetitive of Aristotle and unrepresentative of Aquinas’s own thoughts. As such, little attention has been paid to the specific, and sometimes significant, differences between the two treatments and to what those differences might mean. This paper remedies this situation by focusing on four such differences. I ultimately provide rationales for these differences, thereby arguing (...)
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    Michael Barnwell (2009). De Casu Diaboli: An Examination of Faith and Reason Via a Discussion of the Devil’s Sin. Saint Anselm Journal 6 (2):1-8.
    Although De Casu Diaboli is not a traditional locus for a discussion of faith and reason, it is nonetheless subtly permeated by this topic in two ways. The first concerns Anselm’s general strategy for answering the student’s questions regarding the cause of the devil’s first sin. Anselm ends by claiming the devil willed incorrectly for no other cause than that his will so willed. Anselm thus ultimately calls upon the student to have faith in the mysterious, libertarian self-determining power of (...)
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  4.  7
    Michael Barnwell (2011). Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, Colleen McCluskey, and Christina Van Dyke, Aquinas's Ethics: Metaphysical Foundations, Moral Theory, and Theological Context. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2009. Paper. Pp. Xvi, 243; 1 Table. $30. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (2):483-484.
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  5. Michael Barnwell (2013). Dougherty, M. V.Moral Dilemmas in Medieval Thought: From Gratian to Aquinas. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Pp. 226. $90.00. [REVIEW] Ethics 123 (2):361-365.
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  6. Michael Barnwell (2010). Trolley Cases and Being ‘In the Realm,’. Southwest Philosophical Studies 32:29-35.
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  7.  20
    Michael Barnwell (2010). The Problem of Negligent Omissions: Medieval Action Theories to the Rescue. Brill.
    Introduction : what's the problem? -- The problem may lurk in Aristotle's ethics -- Aristotle's akratic : foreshadowing a solution -- A negligent omission at the root of all sinfulness : Anselm and the Devil -- Negligent vs. non-negligent : a Thomistic distinction directing us toward a solution -- Can I have your divided attention? : Scotus, indistinct intellections, and type-1 negligent omissions almost solved -- I can't get you out of my mind : Scotus, lingering indistinct intellections, and type-2 (...)
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  8. Michael Barnwell (2009). Voluntary Inconsideration, Virtual Cognition, and Francisco Suárez. Southwest Philosophical Studies 31:9-14.
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