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Profile: Michael Brady (Webster University)
  1. David Bain & Michael Brady (2014). Pain, Pleasure, and Unpleasure. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (1):1-14.
    Compare your pain when immersing your hand in freezing water and your pleasure when you taste your favourite wine. The relationship seems obvious. Your pain experience is unpleasant, aversive, negative, and bad. Your experience of the wine is pleasant, attractive, positive, and good. Pain and pleasure are straightforwardly opposites. Or that, at any rate, can seem beyond doubt, and to leave little more to be said. But, in fact, it is not beyond doubt. And, true or false, it leaves a (...)
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  2. Susan Blank, Michael Brady, Ellen Buerk, Waldemar Carlo, Douglas Diekema, Andrew Freedman, Lynne Maxwell, Steven Wegner, Charles LeBaron, Lesley Atwood & Sabrina Craigo (2013). The AAP Task Force on Neonatal Circumcision: A Call for Respectful Dialogue. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (7):442-443.
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  3. Michael S. Brady (2013). Emotional Insight: The Epistemic Role of Emotional Experience. Oup Oxford.
    Michael S. Brady offers a new account of the role of emotions in our lives. He argues that emotional experiences do not give us information in the same way that perceptual experiences do. Instead, they serve our epistemic needs by capturing our attention and facilitating a reappraisal of the evaluative information that emotions themselves provide.
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  4. Michael Brady (ed.) (2011). New Waves in Metaethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Metaethics occupies a central place in analytical philosophy, and the last forty years has seen an upsurge of interest in questions about the nature and practice of morality. This collection presents original and ground-breaking research on metaethical issues from some of the very best of a new generation of philosophers working in this field.
     
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  5. Michael S. Brady (2011). Emotions, Perceptions, and Reasons. In Carla Bagnoli (ed.), Morality and the Emotions. Oxford University Press.
     
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  6. Michael Brady (2010). Disappointment. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 84 (1):179-198.
    Miranda Fricker appeals to the idea of moral-epistemic disappointment in order to show how our practices of moral appraisal can be sensitive to cultural and historical contingency. In particular, she thinks that moral-epistemic disappointment allows us to avoid the extremes of crude moralism and a relativism of distance. In my response I want to investigate what disappointment is, and whether it can constitute a form of focused moral appraisal in the way that Fricker imagines. I will argue that Fricker is (...)
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  7. Michael S. Brady (2010). Virtue, Emotion, and Attention. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):115-131.
    The perceptual model of emotions maintains that emotions involve, or are at least analogous to, perceptions of value. On this account, emotions purport to tell us about the evaluative realm, in much the same way that sensory perceptions inform us about the sensible world. An important development of this position, prominent in recent work by Peter Goldie amongst others, concerns the essential role that virtuous habits of attention play in enabling us to gain perceptual and evaluative knowledge. I think that (...)
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  8. Michael Brady (2009). ``Curiosity and the Value of Truth&Quot. In Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 265-284.
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  9. Michael Brady (2009). Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing • by Miranda Fricker. Analysis 69 (2):380-382.
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  10. Michael S. Brady (2009). Curiosity and the Value of Truth. In Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oup Oxford.
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  11. Michael S. Brady (2009). The Irrationality of Recalcitrant Emotions. Philosophical Studies 145 (3):413 - 430.
    A recalcitrant emotion is one which conflicts with evaluative judgement. (A standard example is where someone is afraid of flying despite believing that it poses little or no danger.) The phenomenon of emotional recalcitrance raises an important problem for theories of emotion, namely to explain the sense in which recalcitrant emotions involve rational conflict. In this paper I argue that existing ‘neojudgementalist’ accounts of emotions fail to provide plausible explanations of the irrationality of recalcitrant emotions, and develop and defend my (...)
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  12. Michael S. Brady (2008). Value and Fitting Emotions. Journal of Value Inquiry 42 (4):465-475.
  13. Michael S. Brady (2007). Recalcitrant Emotions and Visual Illusions. American Philosophical Quarterly 44 (3):273 - 284.
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  14. Michael S. Brady (2006). Appropriate Attitudes and the Value Problem. American Philosophical Quarterly 43 (1):91 - 99.
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  15. Michael Brady & Duncan Pritchard (2006). Epistemic Virtues and Virtue Epistemology. Philosophical Studies 130 (1):1--8.
    This paper introduces the articles in this volume, and offers an overview of each piece.
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  16. Michael Sean Brady (2005). The Value of the Virtues. Philosophical Studies 125 (1):85 - 113.
    Direct theories of the virtues maintain that an explanation of why some virtuous trait counts as valuable should ultimately appeal to the value of its characteristic motive or aim. In this paper I argue that, if we take the idea of a direct approach to virtue theory seriously, we should favour a view according to which virtue involves knowledge. I raise problems for recent “agent-based” and “end-based” versions of the direct approach, show how my account proves preferable to these, and (...)
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  17. Michael Brady & Duncan Pritchard (2005). Epistemological Contextualism: Problems and Prospects. Philosophical Quarterly 55 (219):161 - 171.
    Epistemological contextualism has become one of the most important and widely discussed new proposals in the theory of knowledge. This special issue contributes to the debate by bringing together some of the main participants to provide a state-of-the-art discussion of the proposal. Here we offer a brief overview of the contextualist position, describe some of the main lines of criticism that have been levelled against the view, and present a summary of each of the contributions to this collection.
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  18. Penelope Davies & Michael S. Brady (2005). Ethics. Philosophical Books 46 (3):284-286.
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  19. Duncan Pritchard & Michael Brady (2005). Epistemological Contextualism: Problems and Prospects. Philosophical Quarterly 55 (219):161–171.
    Epistemological contextualism has become one of the most important and widely discussed new proposals in the theory of knowledge. This special issue contributes to the debate by bringing together some of the main participants to provide a state-of-the-art discussion of the proposal. Here we offer a brief overview of the contextualist position, describe some of the main lines of criticism that have been levelled against the view, and present a summary of each of the contributions to this collection.
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  20. Michael S. Brady (2004). Against Agent-Based Virtue Ethics. Philosophical Papers 33 (1):1-10.
    Abstract Agent-based virtue ethics is a unitary normative theory according to which the moral status of actions is entirely dependent upon the moral status of an agent's motives and character traits. One of the problems any such approach faces is to capture the common-sense distinction between an agent's doing the right thing, and her doing it for the right (or wrong) reason. In this paper I argue that agent-based virtue ethics ultimately fails to capture this kind of fine-grained distinction, and (...)
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  21. Michael S. Brady (2003). Valuing, Desiring and Normative Priority. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (211):231 - 242.
    Judgement internalism claims that our evaluative judgements will motivate us to act appropriately, at least in so far as we are rational. I examine how this claim should be understood, with particular focus on whether valuing enjoys a kind of 'normative priority' over desiring. I consider and reject views according to which valuing something provides one with a reason to be moved; this claim of normative priority and the readings of internalism it suggests are too strong. I also reject an (...)
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  22. Michael S. Brady (2003). Some Worries About Normative and Metaethical Sentimentalism. Metaphilosophy 34 (1-2):144-153.
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  23. Michael S. Brady & Duncan Pritchard (2003). Editor's Introduction. Metaphilosophy 34 (3):330-330.
  24. Michael S. Brady & Duncan Pritchard (2003). Moral and Epistemic Virtues. Metaphilosophy 34 (1-2):1-11.
  25. Michael S. Brady (2002). Skepticism, Normativity, and Practical Identity. Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (4):403-412.
  26. Christopher J. Robertson, William F. Crittenden, Michael K. Brady & James J. Hoffman (2002). Situational Ethics Across Borders: A Multicultural Examination. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 38 (4):327 - 338.
    Managers throughout the world regularly face ethical dilemmas that have important, and perhaps complex, professional and personal implications. Further, societal consequences of decisions made can be far-reaching. In this study, 210 financial services managers from Australia, Chile, Ecuador and the United States were queried about their ethical beliefs when faced with four diverse dilemmas. In addition, the situational context was altered so the respondent viewed each dilemma from a top management position and from a position of economic hardship. Results suggest (...)
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  27. Michael Brady (2001). Book Review. Moral Theory and Anomaly Tom Sorell. [REVIEW] Mind 110 (438):562-565.
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  28. Michael Brady (2001). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Hume on Morality. Hume Studies 27 (2):342-344.
  29. Michael Brady (2000). The Virtues of Veritism. Res Publica 6 (2):213-225.
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  30. Michael S. Brady (2000). How to Understand Internalism. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (198):91-97.
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  31. Michael S. Brady (1998). Can Epistemic Contextualism Avoid the Regress Problem? Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (3):317-328.
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  32. Michael S. Brady (1998). Reasons and Rational Motivational Access. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 79 (2):99–114.
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  33. Michael E. Brady (1994). On the Application of J.M. Keynes's Approach to Decision Making. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 8 (2):99 – 112.
    Abstract It is shown that J. M. Keynes was the originator of what is called a weighted monetary value (WMV) approach to decision making under uncertainty and risk as opposed to either the expected monetary value (EMV) or subjective expected utility (SEU) approaches.
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  34. Michael Emmett Brady (1993). J. M. Keynes's Theoretical Approach to Decision-Making Under Conditions of Risk and Uncertainty. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (2):357-376.
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  35. Michael Emmett Brady (1988). J. M. Keynes's Position on the General Applicability of Mathematical, Logical and Statistical Methods in Economics and Social Science. Synthese 76 (1):1 - 24.
    The author finds no support for the claim that J. M. Keynes had severe reservations, in general, as opposed to particular, concerning the application of mathematical, logical and statistical methods in economics. These misinterpretations rest on the omission of important source material as well as a severe misconstrual ofThe Treatise on Probability (1921).
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  36. Michael E. Brady (1987). J. M. Keynes' 'Theory of Evidential Weight': Its Relation to Information Processing Theory and Application in the General Theory. Synthese 71 (1):37 - 59.
    The conclusions derived by Keynes in his Treatise on Probability (1921) concerning induction, analogical reasoning, expectations formation and decision making, mirror and foreshadow the main conclusions of cognitive science and psychology.The problem of weight is studied within an economic context by examining the role it played in Keynes' applied philosophy work, The General Theory (1936). Keynes' approach is then reformulated as an optimal control approach to dealing with changes in information evaluation over time. Based on this analysis the problem of (...)
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