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Michael C. Brannigan [12]Michael Brannigan [6]
  1. Michael C. Brannigan (2012). Cultural Fault Lines in Healthcare: Reflections on Cultural Competency. Lexington Books.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction -- Chapter One: When Worldviews Collide -- Chapter Two: From Fault Lines to Cultural Competency -- Chapter Three: Cultural Discourse and Its Hurdles -- Chapter Four: On the Path to Presence -- Chapter Five: Cultivating Presence When There Is Distrust.
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  2. Michael C. Brannigan (2012). Introduction: Telos, Culture, and Enhancement Technologies. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 20 (4):319-327.
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  3. Michael Brannigan (2010). Organ Extraction From Executed Prisoners: Confucian Considerations. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):27-28.
  4. Michael C. Brannigan (2009). Ikiru and Net-Casting in Intercultural Bioethics. In Sandra Shapshay (ed.), Bioethics at the Movies. Johns Hopkins University Press. 345.
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  5. Michael C. Brannigan (2009). Striking a Balance: A Primer in Traditional Asian Values. Lexington Books.
    Introduction -- Hindu ethics -- Life's four goals -- Paths to Enlightenment -- Karma and rebirth -- Shades of Dharma -- Buddhist ethics -- The middle path -- The four noble truths -- In the wake of karma -- The four supreme virtues -- What is a Buddhist social ethics? -- Zen Buddhist ethics -- A way of the monk : practice is attainment -- A way of the warrior -- A way of tea : the virtue of presence -- (...)
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  6. Kathryn E. Artnak, Erika Blacksher, Michael C. Brannigan, Matti Häyry, Insoo Hyun, Kenneth V. Iserson, Patricia A. Marshall, Maghboeba Mosavel & India J. Ornelas (2008). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian for the Pamela & Kenneth Fong Optometry & Health Sciences Library of the University of California, Berkeley. This Library Serves the UC Berkeley School of Optometry and the UC Berkeley–UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17:137-138.
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  7. Michael C. Brannigan (2008). Heeding Community Voices in Medical Futility Guidelines. HEC Forum 20 (2):105-125.
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  8. Michael C. Brannigan (2008). Connecting the Dots in Cultural Competency: Institutional Strategies and Conceptual Caveats. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (02):173-184.
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  9. Pradip Bhattacharya, Edward T. Ulrich, Joseph A. Bracken, Richard Weiss, Christopher Key Chapple, Michael C. Brannigan, Theodore M. Ludwig, S. Nagarajan, Michael H. Fisher, Steve Derné, Herman Tull, Jarrod W. Brown, Joanna Kirkpatrick, Edward T. Ulrich, Carl Olson & Deepak Sarma (2004). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 8 (1-3):203-227.
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  10. Michael C. Brannigan (2001). Medical Feeding: Applying Husserl and Merleau-Ponty. In. In Kay Toombs (ed.), Handbook of Phenomenology and Medicine. Kluwer. 441--454.
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  11. Michael Brannigan (2000). Cultural Diversity and the Case Against Ethical Relativism. Health Care Analysis 8 (3):321-327.
    The movement to respect culturaldiversity, known as multiculturalism, poses a dauntingchallenge to healthcare ethics. Can we construct adefensible passage from the fact of culturaldifferences to any claims regarding morality? Or doesmulticulturalism lead to ethical relativism? Macklinargues that, in view of a leading distinction betweenuniversalism in ethics and moral absolutism, the onlyreasonable passage avoids both absolutism andrelativism. She presents a strong case againstethical relativism and its pernicious consequences forcross-cultural issues in healthcare. She alsoprovides sound criteria for the assessment of aculture's moral (...)
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  12. Michael C. Brannigan (1999). Relationality and Consensus in Japan: Implications for Bioethics Policy. Health Care Analysis 7 (3):289-296.
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  13. Michael C. Brannigan (1996). Designing Ethicists. Health Care Analysis 4 (3):206-218.
    In the United States, disturbing concerns pertaining to both how putative bioethicists are perceived and the potential for the abuse of their power in connection with these perceptions compel close examination. This paper addresses these caveats by examining two fundamental and interrelated components in the image-construction of the ethicist: definitional and contextual. Definitional features reveal that perceptions and images of the ethicist are especially subject to distortion due to a lack of clarity as to the nature and qualifications of the (...)
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  14. Michael Brannigan (1995). Paper Two: Health Care Needs: The Riddle Behind the Mask. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 3 (4):309-312.
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  15. Michael Brannigan (1993). Oregon's Experiment. Health Care Analysis 1 (1):15-32.
    Oregon's systematic design for universal access to health care, known as the Oregon Basic Health Services Act, has provoked heated debate over its rationale, plan and process. It is a novel attempt to address inequities in the distribution of health care for those below the federal poverty level. Its controversial nature compels more informed discussion to guide further analysis. Accordingly, this report is primarily descriptive, aiming to provide a clear synopsis of the Oregon project's history, complex methodology, and strengths and (...)
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  16. Michael C. Brannigan (1992). Reversibility as a Radical Ground for an Ontology of the Body in Medicine. The Personalist Forum 8:219-224.
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  17. Michael Brannigan (1988). Ken Bryson, Flowers and Death Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 8 (12):469-472.
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