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  1. Michael Bray (2012). Openness as a Form of Closure: Public Sphere, Social Class, and Alexander Kluge's Counterproducts. Telos 2012 (159):144-171.
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  2. Michael Bray (2008). Laughter Between Distraction and Awakening : Marxist Themes in The Office (US). In Jeremy Wisnewski (ed.), The Office and Philosophy: Scenes From the Unexamined Life. Blackwell Pub..
     
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  3. Michael Bray (2008). Sympathy, Disenchantment, and Authority. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 28 (1):159-193.
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  4. Michael Bray (2007). Macpherson Restored? Hobbes and the Question of Social Origins. History of Political Thought 28 (1):56-90.
    This essay reflects on the declining fortunes of C.B. Macpherson's thesis regarding the 'bourgeois' character of Hobbes's political thought. Through a detailed engagement with Macpherson's critics, I argue that determinate transformations of society in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England provide a compelling basis for a revised version of his thesis, if common misinterpretations are corrected and the transition to capitalism is located in the rise of a capitalist aristocracy, as in recent Marxist historiography. Locating Hobbes within this historical frame, allows an (...)
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  5. Michael Bray (2007). Sympathy, Disenchantment, and Authority: Adam Smith and the Construction of Moral Sentiments. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 28 (1):159-193.
  6. Michael Bray (2006). The Hedges That Are Set. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (1):173-200.
    This essay traces out, in the works of Thomas Hobbes, the theoretical development of what I argue is the essential temporal element of modern thought: anxiety regarding the future. What finds systematic expression in Hobbes’s psychology and politics is the dilemma that modern thinking inherits: the project of social rationalization perpetuates an image of an indeterminate future, to which the only possible response is rational submission to a project of administration over men akin to that which science practices on nature.
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  7. Michael Bray (2000). Breckman, Warren. Marx, the Young Hegelians, and the Origins of Radical Social Theory. Review of Metaphysics 54 (2):420-422.
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  8. Michael Bray (1999). Hegel, History, and Interpretation. Review of Metaphysics 52 (3):679-680.
  9. Michael Bray (1999). Vasseleu, Cathryn. Textures of Light: Vision and Touch in Irigaray, Levinas and Merleau-Ponty. Review of Metaphysics 53 (1):204-205.