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  1. Kevin van Schie, Elke Geraerts & Michael C. Anderson (2013). Emotional and Non-Emotional Memories Are Suppressible Under Direct Suppression Instructions. Cognition and Emotion 27 (6):1122-1131.
  2. Pedro M. Paz-Alonso, Simona Ghetti, Bryan J. Matlen, Michael C. Anderson & Silvia A. Bunge (2009). Memory Suppression is an Active Process That Improves Over Childhood. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.
    We all have memories that we prefer not to think about. The ability to suppress retrieval of unwanted memories has been documented in behavioral and neuroimaging research using the Think/No-Think (TNT) paradigm with adults. Attempts to stop memory retrieval are associated with increased activation of lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) and concomitant reduced activation in medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures. However, the extent to which children have the ability to actively suppress their memories is unknown. This study investigated memory suppression in (...)
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  3. Michael C. Anderson & Benjamin J. Levy (2006). Encouraging the Nascent Cognitive Neuroscience of Repression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):511-513.
    Repression has remained controversial for nearly a century on account of the lack of well-controlled evidence validating it. Here we argue that the conceptual and methodological tools now exist for a rigorous scientific examination of repression, and that a nascent cognitive neuroscience of repression is emerging. We review progress in this area and highlight important questions for this field to address.
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  4. Michael C. Anderson & Benjamin Levy (2002). Repression Can (and Should) Be Studied Empirically. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (12):502-503.
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  5. Michael C. Anderson & Theodore Bell (2001). Forgetting Our Facts: The Role of Inhibitory Processes in the Loss of Propositional Knowledge. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (3):544.
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