Search results for 'Michael C. Davis' (try it on Scholar)

587 found
Sort by:
  1. Jonathan C. Gewirtz & Michael Davis (1997). Beyond Attention: The Role of Amygdala NMDA Receptors in Fear Conditioning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):618-619.score: 290.0
    Several types of amygdala-dependent learning can be blocked by local infusion of NMDA antagonists into the amygdala. This blockade shows anatomical, pharmacological, temporal, and behavioral specificity, providing a pattern of data more consistent with a role for NMDA receptors in learning than in arousal or attention, and supporting the contention that an “LTP-like” process is a neural substrate for memory formation.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Michael C. Davis (ed.) (1995). Human Rights and Chinese Values: Legal, Philosophical, and Political Perspectives. Oxford University Press.score: 290.0
    In March 1993, in preparation for the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights, representatives from the states of Asia gathered in Bangkok to formulate their position on this emotive issue. The result of their discussions was the Bangkok declaration. They accepted the concept of universal standards in human rights, but declared that these standards could not overridet he unique Asian regional and cultural differences, the requirements of economic development, nor the privileges of sovereignty. : The difficult and powerful dichotomies (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Michael C. Davis (2001). The Future of Tibet: A Chinese Dilemma. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 2 (2):7-17.score: 290.0
    In a recent speech Amartya Sen argued that democracy had become a universal value. He argued that at this time the burden is on those who would deny democracy to justify their position. He argued that this was a historic change from not long ago when the advocates for democracy in Aisa or Africa had to argue for democracy with their backs to the wall. In Asia, China has historically championed the fight against imperialism and has celebrated the fact the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jonathan C. Gewirtz & Michael Davis (1998). The Startled Seahorse: Is the Hippocampus Necessary for Contextual Fear Conditioning? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (2):42-43.score: 290.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Dale Jamieson, Beverly Peterson Stearns, George C. McGavin, James T. Costa, Michael J. Benton, Mark A. Davis, Laurie J. Vitt, Henry Bennet-Clark, Alexander Milner & Steve Nash (2010). 10. Fall Focus on Books. Bioscience 60 (8).score: 290.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. John Bacon, Alan R. White, M. Glouberman, Lawrence H. Davis, Gershon Weiler, Michael Ruse, Jeffrey Bub, Ilkka Niiniluoto, Yehuda Melzer, Zeev Levy, S. Biderman, Joseph Raz & Irwin C. Lieb (1975). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Philosophia 5 (3):319-384.score: 270.0
    No categories
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jeremy D. Bendik‐Keymer, Thom Brooks, Daniel B. Cohen, Michael Davis, Sara Goering, Barbara V. Nunn, Michael J. Stephens, James C. Taggart, Roy T. Tsao & Lori Watson (2003). Book Notes. [REVIEW] Ethics 113 (2):456-462.score: 270.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Nora K. Bell, Samantha J. Brennan, William F. Bristow, Diana H. Coole, Justin DArms, Michael S. Davis, Daniel A. Dombrowski, John J. P. Donnelly, Anthony J. Ellis, Mark C. Fowler, Alan E. Fuchs, Chris Hackler, Garth L. Hallett, Rita C. Manning, Kevin E. Olson, Lansing R. Pollock, Marc Lee Raphael, Robert A. Sedler, Charlene Haddock Seigfried, Kristin S. Schrader‐Frechette, Anita Silvers, Doran Smolkin, Alan G. Soble, James P. Sterba, Stephen P. Turner & Eric Watkins (2001). Book Notes. [REVIEW] Ethics 111 (2):446-459.score: 270.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Christian Barry, Michael Davis, Peter K. Dews, Aaron V. Garrett, Yusuf Has, Bill E. Lawson, Val Plumwood, Joshua Preiss, Jennifer C. Rubenstein & Avital Simhony (2003). Book Notes. [REVIEW] Ethics 113 (3):734-741.score: 270.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jeremy D. Bendik‐Keymer, Thom Brooks, Daniel B. Cohen, Michael Davis, Sara Goering, Barbara V. Nunn, Michael J. Stephens, James C. Taggart, Roy T. Tsao & Lori Watson (2003). 10. Martin L. Hoffman, Empathy and Moral Development: Implications for Caring and Justice Martin L. Hoffman, Empathy and Moral Development: Implications for Caring and Justice (Pp. 417-419). [REVIEW] Ethics 113 (2).score: 270.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Verónica C. Ramenzoni, Michael A. Riley, Kevin Shockley & Tehran Davis (2008). An Information-Based Approach to Action Understanding. Cognition 106 (2):1059-1070.score: 270.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Michael Davis (1998). Thinking Like an Engineer: Studies in the Ethics of a Profession. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    Michael Davis, a leading figure in the study of professional ethics, offers here both a compelling exploration of engineering ethics and a philosophical analysis of engineering as a profession. After putting engineering in historical perspective, Davis turns to the Challenger space shuttle disaster to consider the complex relationship between engineering ideals and contemporary engineering practice. Here, Davis examines how social organization and technical requirements define how engineers should (and presumably do) think. Later chapters test his analysis (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Michael Davis (1999). Ethics and the University. Routledge.score: 240.0
    Ethics and the University brings together two closely related topics, the practice of ethics in the university ("academic ethics") and the teaching of practical or applied ethics in the university. This volume is divided into four parts: * A survey of practical ethics, offering an explanation of its recent emergence as a university subject, situating that subject into a wider social and historical context and identifying some problems that the subject generates for universities * An examination of research ethics, including (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Stephen Melville, Lynne Cook, Michael Newman, Whitney Davis & Guy Brett (2008). The State of Art Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 18 (3).score: 240.0
    About the Author James Elkins is E.C. Chadbourne Chair in the Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His many books include Pictures and Tears, How to Use Your Eyes, and What Painting Is, all published by Routledge. Michael Newman teaches in the Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and is Professor of Art Writing at Goldsmiths College in the University (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Michael T. Davis (2004). John M. Steane, The Archaeology of Power: England and Northern Europe, AD 800–1600. Stroud, Eng., and Charleston, S.C.: Tempus, 2001. Paper. Pp. 288 Plus 31 Color Plates; 120 Black-and-White Figures. $37.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 79 (3):840-842.score: 210.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Stephen T. Davis (2000). The Rationality of Resurrection for Christians. Philo 3 (1):41-51.score: 150.0
    The present paper is a rejoinder to Michael Martin’s “Reply to Davis” (Philo vol. 2, no. 1), which was a response to my “Is Belief in theResurrection Rational? A Response to Michael Martin” (ibid.), which was itself a response to Martin’s “Why the Resurrection is Initially Improbable” (Philo vol. 1, no. 1), which in turn was a critique of various of my own writings on resurrection, especially Risen Indeed: Making Sense of the Resurrection.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Michael Davis (2012). “Ain't No One Here But Us Social Forces”: Constructing the Professional Responsibility of Engineers. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (1):13-34.score: 150.0
    There are many ways to avoid responsibility, for example, explaining what happens as the work of the gods, fate, society, or the system. For engineers, “technology” or “the organization” will serve this purpose quite well. We may distinguish at least nine (related) senses of “responsibility”, the most important of which are: (a) responsibility-as-causation (the storm is responsible for flooding), (b) responsibility-as-liability (he is the person responsible and will have to pay), (c) responsibility-as-competency (he’s a responsible person, that is, he’s rational), (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. G. Scott Davis (2012). Believing and Acting: The Pragmatic Turn in Comparative Religion and Ethics. OUP Oxford.score: 150.0
    How should religion and ethics be studied if we want to understand what people believe and why they act the way they do? In the 1980s and '90s postmodernist worries about led to debates that turned on power, truth, and relativism. Since the turn of the century scholars impressed by 'cognitive science' have introduced concepts drawn from evolutionary biology, neurosciences, and linguistics in the attempt to provide 'naturalist' accounts of religion. Deploying concepts and arguments that have their roots in the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Angela Davis (forthcoming). Wartime Women Giving Birth: Narratives of Pregnancy and Childbirth, Britain C. 1939–1960. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. James C. Conroy & Robert A. Davis (2002). Transgression, Transformation and Enlightenment: The Trickster as Poet and Teacher. Educational Philosophy and Theory 34 (3):255–272.score: 140.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. James C. Conroy, Robert A. Davis & Penny Enslin (2008). Philosophy as a Basis for Policy and Practice: What Confidence Can We Have in Philosophical Analysis and Argument? Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (s1):165-182.score: 140.0
    The purpose of this article is to suggest how philosophy might play a key, if precisely delineated, role in the shaping of policy that leads educational development. The argument begins with a reflection on the nature of confidence in the relationship between philosophy and policy. We note the widespread resistance to abstract theorising in the policy community, disguising the enormous potential of a philosophical approach. Defending a philosophically equipped approach to policy, which is inevitably theoretically laden, we argue that philosophical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Neal C. Gillespie & Gerald H. Davis (1970). Auguste Comte: Four Lost Letters to America. Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (1):49-63.score: 140.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Hugh C. Black & W. Augustus Davis (1980). Expository Writing:" Shoulds" for the 1980s. Journal of Thought 15 (2):63-68.score: 140.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. C. Center, M. Davis & T. Detre (2003). Ethics Journal of the American Medical Association September 2003, Volume 5, Number 9 Journal Discussion 2. Ethics 5 (9):2.score: 140.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. C. Imbert, D. L. Davis & J. C. Gage (1997). Plato, the Mirror of the World and the Book. Diogenes 45 (178):7-22.score: 140.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Marcia Eveleigh, John C. Syler & Stephen F. Davis (1991). Loretta McGregor. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (4-6):320-322.score: 140.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Michael J. Hynes & Meryl A. Davis (1986). The amdS Gene of Aspergillus Nidulans: Control by Multiple Regulatory Signals. Bioessays 5 (3):123-128.score: 140.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Loretta McGregor, Marcia Eveleigh, John C. Syler & Stephen F. Davis (1991). Self-Perception of Personality Characteristics and the Type A Behavior Pattern. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (4):320-322.score: 140.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. K. A. McNish, J. C. Gewirtz & M. Davis (1998). Have We Taken the Hippocampus Out of Context?—Reply. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (2):42-43.score: 140.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Kermit C. Parsons & Georgia K. Davis (1971). The Urban University and its Urban Environment. Minerva 9 (3):361-385.score: 140.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Roger C. Schank, Gregg C. Collins, Ernest Davis, Peter N. Johnson, Steve Lytinen & Brian J. Reiser (1982). What's the Point? Cognitive Science 6 (3):255-275.score: 140.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Christoph Teufel, Paul C. Fletcher & Greg Davis (2010). Seeing Other Minds: Attributed Mental States Influence Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (8):376-382.score: 140.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. C. Zaslawski & S. Davis (2005). The Ethics of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Research: A Case Study of Traditional Chinese Medicine at the University of Technology, Sydney. Monash Bioethics Review 24 (3):52-60.score: 140.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Michael Davis (1995). An Historical Preface to Engineering Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (1):33-48.score: 120.0
    This article attempts to distinguish between science and technology, on the one hand, and engineering, on the other, offering a brief introduction to engineering values and engineering ethics. The method is (roughly) a philosophical examination of history. Engineering turns out to be a relatively recent enterprise, barely three hundred years old, to have distinctive commitments both technical and moral, and to have changed a good deal both technically and morally during that period. What motivates the paper is the belief that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Michael Davis (2007). Eighteen Rules for Writing a Code of Professional Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2):171-189.score: 120.0
    Most professional societies, scientific associations, and the like that undertake to write a code of ethics do so using other codes as models but without much (practical) guidance about how to do the work. The existing literature on codes is much more concerned with content than procedure. This paper adds to guidance already in the literature what I learned from participating in the writing of an important code of ethics. The guidance is given in the form of “rules” each of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Michael Davis (2005). The Moral Justifiability of Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (2):161-178.score: 120.0
    Since Henry Shue’s classic 1978 paper on torture, the “ticking-bomb case” has seemed to demonstrate that torture is morally justified in some moral emergencies (even if not as an institution). After presenting an analysis of torture as such and an explanation of why it, and anything much like it, is morally wrong, I argue that the ticking-bomb case demonstrates nothing at all—for at least three reasons. First, it is an appeal to intuition. The intuition is not as widely shared as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Michael Davis (1996). Some Paradoxes of Whistleblowing. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 15 (1):3-19.score: 120.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Michael Davis (2003). What Can We Learn by Looking for the First Code of Professional Ethics? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (5):433-454.score: 120.0
    The first code of professional ethics must: (1)be a code of ethics; (2) apply to members of a profession; (3) apply to allmembers of that profession; and (4) apply only to members of that profession. The value of these criteria depends on how we define “code”, “ethics”, and “profession”, terms the literature on professions has defined in many ways. This paper applies one set of definitions of “code”, “ethics”, and “profession” to a part of what we now know of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Michael Davis (1986). Why Attempts Deserve Less Punishment Than Complete Crimes. Law and Philosophy 5 (1):1 - 32.score: 120.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Michael Davis (1983). How to Make the Punishment Fit the Crime. Ethics 93 (4):726-752.score: 120.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Michael Davis (1991). Thinking Like an Engineer: The Place of a Code of Ethics in the Practice of a Profession. Philosophy and Public Affairs 20 (2):150-167.score: 120.0
  42. Michael Davis (1997). Is There a Profession of Engineering? Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (4):407-428.score: 120.0
    This article examines three common arguments for the claim that engineering is not a profession: 1) that engineering lacks an ideal internal to its practice; 2) that engineering’s ideal, whether internal or not, is merely technical; and 3) that engineering lacks the social arrangements characteristic of a true profession. All three arguments are shown to rely on one or another definition of profession, each of which is inadequate. An alternative to these definition is offered. It has at least two advantages. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Michael Davis (2009). Punishment Theory's Golden Half Century: A Survey of Developments From (About) 1957 to 2007. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 13 (1):73 - 100.score: 120.0
    This paper describes developments in punishment theory since the middle of the twentieth century. After the mid–1960s, what Stanley I. Benn called “preventive theories of punishment”—whether strictly utilitarian or more loosely consequentialist like his—entered a long and steep decline, beginning with the virtual disappearance of reform theory in the 1970s. Crowding out preventive theories were various alternatives generally (but, as I shall argue, misleadingly) categorized as “retributive”. These alternatives include both old theories (such as the education theory) resurrected after many (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Michael Davis (2002). A Sound Retributive Argument for the Death Penalty. Criminal Justice Ethics 21 (2):22-26.score: 120.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Michael Davis (1986). Harm and Retribution. Philosophy and Public Affairs 15 (3):236-266.score: 120.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Michael Davis (1984). Setting Penalties: What Does Rape Deserve? [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 3 (1):61 - 110.score: 120.0
    The paper is an application of the principle of just deserts (that is, retribution) to the setting of statutory penalties. The conclusion is that there should be no separate penalty for rape but that rape should be punished under the ordinary battery statutes. The argument has four parts. First, there is a description of the place of rape in a typical statutory scheme. Second, there is a consideration of possible justifications for giving rape the status it has in such a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Michael Davis (2011). The Soul of the Greeks: An Inquiry. University of Chicago Press.score: 120.0
    The soul of Achilles -- Aristotle -- The doubleness of soul -- Out of itself for the sake of itself -- Nutritive soul -- Sensing soul: vision -- Thinking soul. Sensation and imagination ; Passive and active mind ; Imagination and thought -- The soul as self and self-aware -- "The father of the Logos" -- "For the friend is another self" -- Herodotus: the rest and motion of soul -- Rest in motion: Herodotus's Egypt -- Motion at rest: Herodotus's (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Michael Davis (2012). Locke on Consent: The Two Treatises as Practical Ethics. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):464-485.score: 120.0
    Locke's Two Treatises of Government is (primarily) a work of practical (or applied) ethics rather than (as commonly supposed) political philosophy or (as some recent historians have argued) political propaganda. The problem is the oath of allegiance to James II. So interpreting it makes political obligation resemble the special moral obligations of profession rather than the general obligations of morality. Political obligation is the formal moral obligation to law that comes from voluntary participation in law-making (directly or through representatives one (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Michael Fortun, Mark Madison, Edmund Russell, Freddrick R. Davis, Ann F. La Berge & Sally G. Kohlstedt (1998). The J. H. B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 31 (1):143-154.score: 120.0
  50. Michael Davis & Andrew Stark (eds.) (2001). Conflict of Interest in the Professions. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    Conflicts of interest pose special problems for the professions. Even the appearance of a conflict of interest can undermine essential trust between professional and public. This volume is a comprehensive and accessible guide to the ramifications and problems associated with important issue. It contains fifteen new essays by noted scholars and covers topics in law, medicine, journalism, engineering, financial services, and others.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 587