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  1.  5 DLs
    Michael C. J. Putnam (2007). Horace Carm. 4.7 and the Epic Tradition. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 100 (4):355-362.
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  2.  4 DLs
    Michael C. J. Putnam (1989). Virgil and Tacitus, Ann. 1.10. Classical Quarterly 39 (02):563-.
    Among the insinuations that Tacitus bequeaths to posterity in the negative segment of his post mortem of Augustus is the emperor's putative role as machinator doli in the death of the consul Hirtius during the fighting at Mutina in the spring of 43. The historian is thinking of a focal moment in the Aeneid when Sinon releases his fellow Greeks from within the wooden horse. I quote Aen. 2.264–7. Among the heroes who descend from the animal's belly are Ulixes, Neoptolemus (...)
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    Michael C. J. Putnam (1971). Aes Triplex (Horace, Odes 1.3. 9). Classical Quarterly 21 (02):454-.
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    Michael C. J. Putnam (2006). Horace to Torquatus: Epistle 1.5 and Ode 4.7. American Journal of Philology 127 (3):387-413.
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    Michael C. J. Putnam (1985). Romulus Tropaeophorus ( Aeneid 6.779–80). Classical Quarterly 35 (01):237-.
    A general consensus has emerged among twentieth-century commentators on the Aeneid that pater ipse…superum must be taken together and understood as referring to the father of the gods and not to Mars, sire of Romulus. What remains a subject of debate is the meaning of honor here and its particular association with Jupiter. Does it betoken the abstraction itself or a concrete manifestation of it? Austin, following Donatus, opts for the former alternative , Norden and R. D. Williams for the (...)
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    Michael C. J. Putnam (1998). Repetition in Latin Poetry: Figures of Allusion (Review). American Journal of Philology 119 (2):295-300.
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    Michael C. J. Putnam (1990). Virgil's Lapiths. Classical Quarterly 40 (02):562-.
    Few details in Virgil's description of the underworld have elicited more comment than his treatment of the sinners Ixion and Pirithous quid memorem Lapithas, Ixiona Pirithoumque? quos super atra silex iam iam lapsura cadentique imminet adsimilis; lucent genialibus altis aurea fulcra toris; epulaeque ante ora paratae regifico luxu; Furiarum maxima iuxta accubat et manibus prohibet contingere mensas exsurgitque facem attollens atque intonat ore.
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    Michael C. J. Putnam (forthcoming). The Lyric Genius of the" Aeneid". Arion 3 (2/3).
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    Michael C. J. Putnam (forthcoming). Ganymede and Virgilian Ekphrasis. American Journal of Philology.
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    Michael C. J. Putnam (forthcoming). Daedalus, Virgil and the End of Art. American Journal of Philology.
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    Michael C. J. Putnam (2003). Two Ways of Looking at the Aeneid. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 96 (2).
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