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Profile: Michael Davis (State University of New York, Buffalo)
Profile: M.J. Davis (Universidad de Los Andes)
  1. Michael Davis (forthcoming). Locke's Political Society: Some Problems of Terminology in Two Treatises of Government. Journal of Moral Philosophy:1-23.
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  2. Michael Davis (forthcoming). Professional Autonomy: A Framework for Empirical Research. Business Ethics Quarterly.
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  3. Michael Davis (forthcoming). Why Physicians Should Not Be Involved in Hostile Interrogations. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics:1-9.
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  4. Richard A. Burgess, Michael Davis, Marilyn A. Dyrud, Joseph R. Herkert, Rachelle D. Hollander, Lisa Newton, Michael S. Pritchard & P. Aarne Vesilind (2013). Engineering Ethics: Looking Back, Looking Forward. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1395-1404.
    The eight pieces constituting this Meeting Report are summaries of presentations made during a panel session at the 2011 Association for Practical and Professional Ethics (APPE) annual meeting held between March 3rd and 6th in Cincinnati. Lisa Newton organized the session and served as chair. The panel of eight consisted both of pioneers in the field and more recent arrivals. It covered a range of topics from how the field has developed to where it should be going, from identification of (...)
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  5. Michael Davis (2013). A Present Like Ours. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (1):75-90.
    This paper seeks to refute Don Marquis’s well-known “future like ours” argument against abortion (1989) by offering an alternative explanation for why killing people is prima facie morally wrong, one which overall is at least as good as Marquis’s. That alternative is in part that what makes killing “us” wrong is not primarily that it denies us a future (as Marquis would have it) but that it ends our present. Of course, Marquis has dismissed other present-state explanations for what may (...)
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  6. Michael Davis (2013). Locke (and Hobbes) on “Property” in the State of Nature. International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (3):271-287.
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  7. Michael Davis (2013). World Government. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):269-275.
  8. Michael Davis & Matthew W. Keefer (2013). Getting Started: Helping a New Profession Develop an Ethics Program. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):259-264.
    Both of us have been involved with helping professions, especially new scientific or technological professions, develop ethics programs—for undergraduates, graduates, and practitioners. By “ethics program”, we mean any strategy for teaching ethics, including developing materials. Our purpose here is to generalize from that experience to identify the chief elements needed to get an ethics program started in a new profession. We are focusing on new professions for two reasons. First, all the older professions, both in the US and in most (...)
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  9. Michael Davis, Andrew Kumiega & Ben Van Vliet (2013). Ethics, Finance, and Automation: A Preliminary Survey of Problems in High Frequency Trading. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):851-874.
    All of finance is now automated, most notably high frequency trading. This paper examines the ethical implications of this fact. As automation is an interdisciplinary endeavor, we argue that the interfaces between the respective disciplines can lead to conflicting ethical perspectives; we also argue that existing disciplinary standards do not pay enough attention to the ethical problems automation generates. Conflicting perspectives undermine the protection those who rely on trading should have. Ethics in finance can be expanded to include organizational and (...)
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  10. Michael Davis, Andrew Kumiega & Ben Vliet (2013). Ethics, Finance, and Automation: A Preliminary Survey of Problems in High Frequency Trading. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):851-874.
    All of finance is now automated, most notably high frequency trading. This paper examines the ethical implications of this fact. As automation is an interdisciplinary endeavor, we argue that the interfaces between the respective disciplines can lead to conflicting ethical perspectives; we also argue that existing disciplinary standards do not pay enough attention to the ethical problems automation generates. Conflicting perspectives undermine the protection those who rely on trading should have. Ethics in finance can be expanded to include organizational and (...)
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  11. Michael Davis & Kelly Laas (2013). “Broader Impacts” or “Responsible Research and Innovation”? A Comparison of Two Criteria for Funding Research in Science and Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-21.
    Our subject is how the experience of Americans with a certain funding criterion, “broader impacts” (and some similar criteria) may help in efforts to turn the European concept of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) into a useful guide to funding Europe’s scientific and technical research. We believe this comparison may also be as enlightening for Americans concerned with revising research policy. We have organized our report around René Von Schomberg’s definition of RRI, since it seems both to cover what the (...)
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  12. Michael Davis, Catherine H. Zuckert, Gwenda-lin Grewal, Mary P. Nichols, Denise Schaeffer, Christopher A. Colmo, David Corey, Matthew Dinan, Jacob Howland, Evanthia Speliotis, Ronna Burger & Christopher Dustin (2013). Socratic Philosophy and its Others. Lexington Books.
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  13. Michael Davis (2012). “Ain't No One Here But Us Social Forces”: Constructing the Professional Responsibility of Engineers. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (1):13-34.
    There are many ways to avoid responsibility, for example, explaining what happens as the work of the gods, fate, society, or the system. For engineers, “technology” or “the organization” will serve this purpose quite well. We may distinguish at least nine (related) senses of “responsibility”, the most important of which are: (a) responsibility-as-causation (the storm is responsible for flooding), (b) responsibility-as-liability (he is the person responsible and will have to pay), (c) responsibility-as-competency (he’s a responsible person, that is, he’s rational), (...)
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  14. Michael Davis (2012). A Plea for Judgment. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (4):789-808.
    Judgment is central to engineering, medicine, the sciences and many other practical activities. For example, one who otherwise knows what engineers know but lacks engineering judgment may be an expert of sorts, a handy resource much like a reference book or database, but cannot be a competent engineer. Though often overlooked or at least passed over in silence, the central place of judgment in engineering, the sciences, and the like should be obvious once pointed out. It is important here because (...)
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  15. Michael Davis (2012). Imaginary Cases in Ethics. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):1-17.
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  16. Michael Davis (2012). Locke on Consent: The Two Treatises as Practical Ethics. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):464-485.
    Locke's Two Treatises of Government is (primarily) a work of practical (or applied) ethics rather than (as commonly supposed) political philosophy or (as some recent historians have argued) political propaganda. The problem is the oath of allegiance to James II. So interpreting it makes political obligation resemble the special moral obligations of profession rather than the general obligations of morality. Political obligation is the formal moral obligation to law that comes from voluntary participation in law-making (directly or through representatives one (...)
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  17. Michael Davis (2012). Rewarding Whistleblowers. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):269-277.
    Since 2010, Section 922 of the Dodd-Frank Act has required the Securities and Exchange Commission to give a significant financial reward to any whistleblower who voluntarily discloses original information concerning fraud or other unlawful activity. How, if at all, might such “incentives” change our understanding of whistleblowing? My answer is that, while incentives should not change the definition of whistleblowing, it should change our understanding of the justification of whistleblowing. We need to distinguish the public justification of whistleblowing, its public (...)
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  18. Michael Davis (2012). Torture, Terror, and War: Justifying Exceptions to Ordinary Moral Decency. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (3):264-267.
  19. Michael T. Davis (2012). Olson, Ed., Working with Limestone: The Science, Technology and Art of Medieval Limestone Monuments. (AVISTA Studies in the History of Medieval Technology, Science and Art 7.) Farnham, Surrey, UK: Ashgate, 2011. Pp. Xxii, 263; 115 B&W Figs. $119.95. ISBN: 9780754662464. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (4):1235-1237.
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  20. Michael Davis & Alan Feinerman (2012). Assessing Graduate Student Progress in Engineering Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):351-367.
    Under a grant from the National Science Foundation, the authors (and others) undertook to integrate ethics into graduate engineering classes at three universities—and to assess success in a way allowing comparison across classes (and institutions). This paper describes the attempt to carry out that assessment. Standard methods of assessment turned out to demand too much class time. Under pressure from instructors, the authors developed an alternative method that is both specific in content to individual classes and allows comparison across classes. (...)
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  21. Matthew W. Keefer & Michael Davis (2012). Curricular Design And Assessment In Professional Ethics Education. Teaching Ethics 13 (1):81-90.
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  22. John E. Alvis, George Anastaplo, Paul A. Cantor, Jerrold R. Caplan, Michael Davis, Robert Goldberg, Kenneth Hart Green, Harry V. Jaffa, Antonio Marino-López, Joshua Parens, Sharon Portnoff, Robert D. Sacks, Owen J. Sadlier & Martin D. Yaffe (2011). The Companionship of Books: Essays in Honor of Laurence Berns. Lexington Books.
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  23. Peter Asp, Christopher Bennett, Peter Cave, J. Angelo Corlett, Richard Dagger, Michael Davis, Anthony Ellis, Thomas S. Petersen, Julian V. Roberts & Torbjörn Tännsjö (2011). Recidivist Punishments: The Philosopher's View. Lexington Books.
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  24. Michael Davis (2011). A Little Give and Take: Problems in the Empiricism of Sellars and His Followers. Discusiones Filosóficas 11 (17):53-67.
    The starting point of this paper is Sellars’s rejection of foundationalist empiricism as found in his discussion of the Myth of the Given. Sellars attacks the Myth from two main angles, corresponding to the two elements of empiricism: the idea that our beliefs are justified by the world, and the idea that our concepts are derived from experience. In correctly attacking the second, Sellars is also, incorrectly, led to attack the first. Thus, Sellars rejects the commonsensical idea that at least (...)
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  25. Michael Davis (2011). Replacement as a Problem for the Justification of Preventive Detention. Criminal Justice Ethics 30 (1):90-97.
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  26. Michael Davis (2011). The Soul of the Greeks: An Inquiry. University of Chicago Press.
    The soul of Achilles -- Aristotle -- The doubleness of soul -- Out of itself for the sake of itself -- Nutritive soul -- Sensing soul: vision -- Thinking soul. Sensation and imagination ; Passive and active mind ; Imagination and thought -- The soul as self and self-aware -- "The father of the Logos" -- "For the friend is another self" -- Herodotus: the rest and motion of soul -- Rest in motion: Herodotus's Egypt -- Motion at rest: Herodotus's (...)
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  27. Michael Davis (2011). The Tragedy of Law. Review of Metaphysics 53 (3):635-655.
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  28. Michael Davis (2011). The Usefulness of Moral Theory in Teaching Practical Ethics. Teaching Ethics 12 (1):51-60.
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  29. Michael Davis (2010). Is University Teaching of _ A Profession? Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 7 (2):41-52.
  30. Michael Davis (2010). Licensing, Philosophical Counselors, and Barbers. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):225-236.
    Philosophical counselors are now debating whether they should be licensed in the way psychiatrists, psychologists, and other similar helping professions are. The side favoring licensing claim it is a step on the way to making philosophical counseling “a profession.” In this paper I explain why licensing has nothing to do with making a profession of philosophical counseling—and what does. In particular, I offer a definition of profession, explain its application to philosophical counseling, and defend it against competitors (especially various sociological (...)
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  31. Michael Davis (2010). The Poverty of Medical Ethics. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):93-99.
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  32. Michael Davis (2010). Why Journalism is a Profession. In Christopher Meyers (ed.), Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach. Oxford University Press. 91--102.
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  33. Michael Davis (2010). What Punishment for the Murder of 10,000? Res Publica 16 (2):101-118.
    Those who commit crime on a grand scale, numbering their victims in the thousands, seem to pose a special problem both for consequentialist and for non-consequentialist theories of punishment, a problem the International Criminal Court makes practical. This paper argues that at least one non-consequentialist theory of punishment, the fairness theory, can provide a justification of punishment for great crimes. It does so by dividing the question into two parts, the one of proportion which it answers directly, and the other (...)
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  34. Michael Davis (2009). Defining Engineering From Chicago to Shantou. The Monist 92 (3):325-338.
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  35. Michael Davis (2009). Is Engineering a Profession Everywhere? Philosophia 37 (2):211-225.
    Though this paper is mostly about a sense of “profession” common in much of the West, it explains how the term might apply in any country (especially how the profession of engineering differs from the function, discipline, and occupation of engineering). To do that, I have to explain the connection between “profession” (in my preferred sense) and another hard-to-translate term, “code of ethics” (in the sense it has in the expression “code of engineering ethics”). To understand engineering (or any other (...)
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  36. Michael Davis (2009). Punishment Theory's Golden Half Century: A Survey of Developments From (About) 1957 to 2007. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 13 (1):73 - 100.
    This paper describes developments in punishment theory since the middle of the twentieth century. After the mid–1960s, what Stanley I. Benn called “preventive theories of punishment”—whether strictly utilitarian or more loosely consequentialist like his—entered a long and steep decline, beginning with the virtual disappearance of reform theory in the 1970s. Crowding out preventive theories were various alternatives generally (but, as I shall argue, misleadingly) categorized as “retributive”. These alternatives include both old theories (such as the education theory) resurrected after many (...)
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  37. Michael Davis (2009). Review of Physicians at War: The Dual-Loyalties Challenge. [REVIEW] Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 3 (2).
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  38. Michael Davis (2009). Terrorists Are Just Patients. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (10):56-57.
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  39. Michael Davis (2009). The Fake That Launched a Thousand Ships : The Question of Identity in Euripides' Helen. In William Robert Wians (ed.), Logos and Muthos: Philosophical Essays in Greek Literature. State University of New York Press.
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  40. Michael Davis (2009). The Usefulness of Moral Theory in Practical Ethics. Teaching Ethics 10 (1):69-78.
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  41. Michael T. Davis (2009). Tom McNeill, Faith, Pride and Works: Medieval Church Building. Stroud, Eng.: Tempus, 2006. Paper. Pp. 253; 103 Black-and-White Figures.£ 19.99. [REVIEW] Speculum 84 (1):189-191.
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  42. Michael Davis (2008). Justifying Torture as an Act of War. In Larry May & Emily Crookston (eds.), War: Essays in Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  43. Michael Davis (2008). Torturing Professions. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2):243-263.
    What are the conceptual connections between torture and profession? Exploring this question requires exploring at least two others. Before we can work out the conceptual connections between profession and torture, we must have a suitable conception of both profession and torture. We seem to have several conceptions of each. So, I first identify several alternative conceptions of profession, explaining why one should be preferred over the others. Next, I do the same for torture; and then, I argue that, given the (...)
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  44. Michael Davis (2007). Eighteen Rules for Writing a Code of Professional Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2):171-189.
    Most professional societies, scientific associations, and the like that undertake to write a code of ethics do so using other codes as models but without much (practical) guidance about how to do the work. The existing literature on codes is much more concerned with content than procedure. This paper adds to guidance already in the literature what I learned from participating in the writing of an important code of ethics. The guidance is given in the form of “rules” each of (...)
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  45. Michael Davis (2007). Mark R. Reiff, Punishment, Compensation, and Law: A Theory of Enforceability:Punishment, Compensation, and Law: A Theory of Enforceability. Ethics 118 (1):171-175.
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  46. Michael Davis (2007). Torture and the Inhumane. Criminal Justice Ethics 26 (2):29-43.
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  47. Michael Davis (2006). Engineering Ethics, Individuals, and Organizations. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):223-231.
    This article evaluates a family of criticism of how engineering ethics is now generally taught. The short version of the criticism might be put this way: Teachers of engineering ethics devote too much time to individual decisions and not enough time to social context. There are at least six version of this criticism, each corresponding to a specific subject omitted. Teachers of engineering ethics do not (it is said) teach enough about: 1) the culture of organizations; 2) the organization of (...)
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  48. Michael Davis (2006). Heavenly Philosophy. Social Theory and Practice 32 (3):341-364.
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  49. Michael Davis (2006). Integrating Ethics Into Technical Courses: Micro-Insertion. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):717-730.
    Perhaps the most common reason science and engineering faculty give for not including “ethics” (that is, research ethics, engineering ethics, or some discussion of professional responsibility) in their technical classes is that “there is no room”. This article 1) describes a technique (“micro-insertion”) that introduces ethics (and related topics) into technical courses in small enough units not to push out technical material, 2) explains where this technique might fit into the larger undertaking of integrating ethics into the technical (scientific or (...)
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  50. Michael Davis (2006). IIT's Workshops for Integrating Ethics Into Technical Courses. Teaching Ethics 6 (2):29-42.
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