40 found
Order:
See also:
Profile: Michael DePaul (University of Notre Dame)
  1. Michael R. DePaul & William Ramsey (eds.) (1998). Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and its Role in Philosophical Inquiry. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Ancients and moderns alike have constructed arguments and assessed theories on the basis of common sense and intuitive judgments. Yet, despite the important role intuitions play in philosophy, there has been little reflection on fundamental questions concerning the sort of data intuitions provide, how they are supposed to lead us to the truth, and why we should treat them as important. In addition, recent psychological research seems to pose serious challenges to traditional intuition-driven philosophical inquiry. Rethinking Intuition brings together a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   131 citations  
  2. Michael DePaul & William Ramsey (eds.) (1998). Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and its Role in Philosophical Inquiry. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Ancients and moderns alike have constructed arguments and assessed theories on the basis of common sense and intuitive judgments. Yet, despite the important role intuitions play in philosophy, there has been little reflection on fundamental questions concerning the sort of data intuitions provide, how they are supposed to lead us to the truth, and why we should treat them as important. In addition, recent psychological research seems to pose serious challenges to traditional intuition-driven philosophical inquiry. Rethinking Intuition brings together a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   78 citations  
  3. Michael R. DePaul & Linda Zagzebski (eds.) (2003). Intellectual Virtue: Perspectives From Ethics and Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    The idea of a virtue has traditionally been important in ethics, but only recently has gained attention as an idea that can explain how we ought to form beliefs as well as how we ought to act. Moral philosophers and epistemologists have different approaches to the idea of intellectual virtue; here, Michael DePaul and Linda Zagzebski bring work from both fields together for the first time to address all of the important issues. It will be required reading for anyone working (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   29 citations  
  4.  62
    Michael R. DePaul (1993). Balance and Refinement: Beyond Coherence Methods of Moral Inquiry. Routledge.
    We all have moral beliefs. What if we are unsure about what to believe about a serious moral issue, or if one belief conflicts with another that we hold with equal conviction? When such conflicts and doubts occur, we try to make our beliefs cohere, and are forced to engage in a moral inquiry. Michael R. DePaul argues that we have to make our beliefs cohere, but that the current coherence methods are seriously flawed. Methods such as that which John (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   24 citations  
  5. Michael R. DePaul & William Ramsey (eds.) (1998). Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and Its Role in Philosophical Inquiry. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Students and scholars in both fields will find this book to be of great value.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  6. Michael R. Depaul (1988). Naivete and Corruption in Moral Inquiry. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (4):619-635.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7.  67
    Michael R. Depaul & Stephen R. Grimm (2007). Review Essay on Jonathan Kvanvig's the Value of Knowledge and the Pursuit of Understanding. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (2):498–514.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  8.  75
    Michael Depaul (2009). Phenomenal Conservatism and Self-Defeat. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (1):205-212.
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  9.  52
    Michael R. DePaul (2004). Truth Consequentialism, Withholding and Proportioning Belief to the Evidence. Philosophical Issues 14 (1):91–112.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  10.  48
    Michael R. Depaul (1988). The Problem of the Criterion and Coherence Methods in Ethics. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):67 - 86.
    One merit claimed for john rawls's coherence method, Wide reflective equilibrium, Is that it transcends the traditional two tiered approach to moral inquiry according to which one must choose as one's starting points either particular moral judgments or general moral principles. The two tiered conception of philosophical method is not limited to ethics. The most detailed exposition of the conception can be found in r m chisholm's various discussions of the problem of the criterion. While chisholm's work has played a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  11.  18
    Linda Zagzebski & Michael Depaul (2004). Intellectual Virtue. Mind 113 (452):791-794.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  72
    Michael R. Depaul (1988). Argument and Perception: The Role of Literature in Moral Inquiry. Journal of Philosophy 85 (10):552-565.
  13.  42
    Michael R. DePaul (1986). Reflective Equilibrium and Foundationalism. American Philosophical Quarterly 23 (1):59 - 69.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  14. Michael DePaul (2006). Intuitions in Moral Inquiry. In David Copp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory. Oxford University Press 595--623.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  15.  32
    Michael DePaul (2000). Character Traits, Virtues, and Vices. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 9:141-157.
    Recently, Gilbert Harman has used empirical results obtained by social psychologists to argue that there are no character traits of the type presupposed by virtue ethics—no honesty or dishonesty, no courage or cowardice, in short, no virtue or vice. In this paper, I critically assess his argument as well as that of the social psychologists he appeals to. I suggest that the experimental results recounted by Harman would not much concern such classical virtue theorists as Plato—particularly the Plato of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  16.  40
    Michael R. Depaul (1987). Supervenience and Moral Dependence. Philosophical Studies 51 (3):425 - 439.
    One aim philosophers have in constructing moral theories is to identify the natural or non-Moral characteristics that make actions right or obligatory, Things good, Or persons virtuous. Yet we have no clear understanding of what it is for certain of a thing's non-Moral properties to be responsible for its moral properties. Given the recent interest in the concept of supervenience one might think that the dependence of moral on natural properties could be explained in terms of it. Unfortunately, None of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  17.  53
    Michael R. DePaul (1987). Two Conceptions of Coherence Methods in Ethics. Mind 96 (384):463-481.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  18.  73
    Michael DePaul (2009). Pyrrhonian Moral Skepticism and the Problem of the Criterion. Philosophical Issues 19 (1):38-56.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  27
    Michael R. DePaul (2000). Linguistics is Not a Good Model for Philosophy. Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (S1):113-120.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20.  44
    Michael R. DePaul (1998). Liberal Exclusions and Foundationalism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (1):103-120.
    Certain versions of liberalism exclude from public political discussions the reasons some citizens regard as most fundamental, reasons having to do with their deepest religious, philosophical, moral or political views. This liberal exclusion of deep and deeply held reasons from political discussions has been controversial. In this article I will point out a way in which the discussion seems to presuppose a foundationalist conception of human reasoning. This is rather surprising, inasmuch as one of the foremost advocates of liberalism, John (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21. Michael R. DePaul (2009). Ugly Analyses and Value. In Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Epistemic Value. OUP Oxford
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  19
    Michael R. Depaul & Stephen R. Grimm (2007). The Value of Knowledge and the Pursuit of Understanding by Jonathan Kvanvig. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (2):498-514.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23.  25
    Michael DePaul (2009). Do Heuristics Provide a Good Model for Moral Intuition or Moral Perception? Modern Schoolman 86 (3-4):349-362.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  32
    Michael DePaul (2011). Sosa, Certainty and the Problem of the Criterion. Philosophical Papers 40 (3):287-304.
    Abstract In Reflective Knowledge, Ernest Sosa continues his detailed and intriguing defense of his two level account of knowledge that recognizes both animal and reflective knowledge. The latter more impressive type of knowledge requires a coherent positive epistemic perspective defending the reliability of a source of belief. Viewing Sosa's discussion from the through the lens provided by R.M. Chisholm's treatments of the problem of the criterion, I worry that Sosa's approach is too far in the methodist direction. As a result, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  26
    Michael R. Depaul (1993). Brink's Moral Realism and the Foundations of Ethics. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (3):731-735.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  12
    Michael DePaul (2013). Agent Centeredness, Agent Neutrality, Disagreement, and Truth Conduciveness. In Chris Tucker (ed.), Seemings and Justification: New Essays on Dogmatism and Phenomenal Conservatism. OUP Usa 202.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  34
    Michael R. DePaul (2002). A Half Dozen Puzzles Regarding Intrinsic Attitudinal Hedonism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):629-635.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  16
    Michael R. DePaul (1991). The Highest Moral Knowledge and the Truth Behind Internalism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 29 (S1):137-160.
  29. Michael R. DePaul (2006). Balance and Refinement: Beyond Coherence Methods of Moral Inquiry. Routledge.
    We all have moral beliefs. But what if one beleif conflicts with another? DePaul argues that we have to make our beliefs cohere, but that the current coherence methods are seriously flawed. It is not just the arguments that need to be considered in moral enquiry. DePaul asserts that the ability to make sensitive moral judgements is vital to any philosophical inquiry into morality. The inquirer must consider how her life experiences and experiences with literature, film and theatre have influenced (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30. Michael DePaul (ed.) (2000). Resurrecting Old-Fashioned Foundationalism. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The contributions in this volume make an important effort to resurrect a rather old fashioned form of foundationalism. They defend the position that there are some beliefs that are justified, and are not themselves justified by any further beliefs. This epistemic foundationalism has been the subject of rigorous attack by a wide range of theorists in recent years, leading to the impression that foundationalism is a thing of the past. DePaul argues that it is precisely the volume and virulence of (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31.  11
    Michael R. DePaul (1981). The Rationality of Belief in God. Religious Studies 17 (3):343 - 356.
    The major purpose of Hans Kung's SOO-page book entitled Does God Exist? is to show that belief in the Christian God is rationally justifiable. Given the title, purpose and size of the book, I was surprised by many of the things the book does not contain. It gives little attention and offers no solution to the problem of evil; it deals briefly with the traditional proofs for God, devoting at most one page each to the cosmological, teleological, ontological and moral (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  5
    Michael R. Depaul (1993). Moral Realism and the Foundations of Ethics. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (3):731-735.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  4
    Michael R. Depaul (1990). Critical Notice. Mind 99 (396):619 - 633.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  10
    Michael R. DePaul (2002). Critical Study: Goldman, Alvin I.Knowledge in a Social World. Noûs 36 (2):335–350.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  7
    Michael R. DePaul (1988). Moral Statuses. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (4):517 – 532.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Michael R. DePaul (1988). Argument and Perception: The Role of Literature in Moral Inquiry. Journal of Philosophy 85 (10):552-565.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Michael R. DePaul (2013). Balance and Refinement: Beyond Coherence Methods of Moral Inquiry. Routledge.
    We all have moral beliefs. But what if one beleif conflicts with another? DePaul argues that we have to make our beliefs cohere, but that the current coherence methods are seriously flawed. It is not just the arguments that need to be considered in moral enquiry. DePaul asserts that the ability to make sensitive moral judgements is vital to any philosophical inquiry into morality. The inquirer must consider how her life experiences and experiences with literature, film and theatre have influenced (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Michael DePaul (1995). Coherentism. In Audi Robert (ed.), The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy. Cambridge University Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Michael DePaul & Linda Zagzebski (eds.) (2007). Intellectual Virtue: Perspectives From Ethics and Epistemology. Clarendon Press.
    The idea of a virtue has traditionally been important in ethics, but only recently has gained attention as an idea that can explain how we ought to form beliefs as well as how we ought to act. Moral philosophers and epistemologists have different approaches to the idea of intellectual virtue; here, Michael DePaul and Linda Zagzebski bring work from both fields together for the first time to address all of the important issues. It will be required reading for anyone working (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Michael R. Depaul (1981). The Rationality of Belief in God: MICHAEL R. DEPAUL. Religious Studies 17 (3):343-356.
    In the introduction to his account of the debate concerning religion between Cleanthes, Philo and Demea, Pamphilus remarks that ‘reasonable men may be allowed to differ where no one can reasonably be positive’. Pamphilus goes on to suggest that natural theology is an area that abounds with issues about which ‘no one can reasonably be positive’. Assuming that the beliefs of reasonable men are themselves reasonable, Pamphilus can be interpreted as holding that If no one is reasonably positive that the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography