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Profile: Michael Dickson (University of South Carolina)
  1. Michael Dickson (2013). Theory From Chaos. Episteme 10 (4):465-478.
    I explore an agent-based model of the development and dissemination of scientific theory that makes very little use of any pre-defined (such as partnerships or collaborations). In these models, under a broad range of values of the parameters, widespread (but not universal) about scientific theory emerges. Moreover, the residual disagreement turns out to be important to developing new theories in the face of new evidence.
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  2. Michael Dickson (2012). Guido Bacciagaluppi and Antony Valentini , Quantum Theory at the Crossroads: Reconsidering the 1927 Solvay Conference . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (2009), 530 Pp., $135.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 79 (1):175-177.
  3. Michael Dickson (2011). Aspects of Probability in Quantum Theory. In Claus Beisbart & Stephan Hartmann (eds.), Probabilities in Physics. Oxford University Press. 171.
  4. Michael Dickson (2010). Dirac and Mathematical Beauty. In Michael Friedman, Mary Domski & Michael Dickson (eds.), Discourse on a New Method: Reinvigorating the Marriage of History and Philosophy of Science. Open Court.
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  5. Mary Domski & Michael Dickson (2010). Discourse on a New Method, or a Manifesto for a Synthetic Approach to History and Philosophy of Science. In Michael Friedman, Mary Domski & Michael Dickson (eds.), Discourse on a New Method: Reinvigorating the Marriage of History and Philosophy of Science. Open Court.
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  6. Michael Friedman, Mary Domski & Michael Dickson (eds.) (2010). Discourse on a New Method: Reinvigorating the Marriage of History and Philosophy of Science. Open Court.
    Addressing a wide range of topics, from Newton to Post-Kuhnian philosophy of science, these essays critically examine themes that have been central to the influential work of philosopher Michael Friedman.
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  7. Michael Dickson, Modal Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  8. Michael Dickson (2007). Intuition in Metaphysics. Philosophical Topics 35 (1/2):43-65.
    ‘Seeing is believing’ perhaps means that some visual experience provides good evidence for some claims that go beyond the content of the experience. Intuition—intellectual ‘seeming’—does not provide similarly good evidence, at least not for metaphysical claims, or so I shall argue. In §2, I sketch the conception of ‘metaphysics’ that is in use here, a conception that leads naturally to a problem about what counts as evidence in metaphysics. Some have suggested that intuition counts. In §3 I raise some doubts (...)
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  9. Michael Dickson (2007). Is Measurement a Black Box? On the Importance of Understanding Measurement Even in Quantum Information and Computation. Philosophy of Science 74 (5):1019–1032.
    It has been argued, partly from the lack of any widely accepted solution to the measurement problem, and partly from recent results from quantum information theory, that measurement in quantum theory is best treated as a black box. However, there is a crucial difference between ‘having no account of measurement' and ‘having no solution to the measurement problem'. We know a lot about measurements. Taking into account this knowledge sheds light on quantum theory as a theory of information and computation. (...)
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  10. Michael Dickson, Non-Relativistic Quantum Mechanics.
    This essay is a discussion of the philosophical and foundational issues that arise in non-relativistic quantum theory. After introducing the formalism of the theory, I consider: characterizations of the quantum formalism, empirical content, uncertainty, the measurement problem, and non-locality. In each case, the main point is to give the reader some introductory understanding of some of the major issues and recent ideas.
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  11. Michael Dickson (2007). Review of Tomasz F. Bigaj, Non-Locality and Possible Worlds: A Counterfactual Perspective on Quantum Entanglement. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (7).
  12. Michael Dickson (2005). From the New Editor. Philosophy of Science 72 (2).
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  13. Michael Dickson, Elisabeth A. Lloyd, C. Kenneth Waters, Matthew Dunn, Jennifer Cianciollo, Costas Mannouris, Richard Bradley & James Mattingly (2005). 1. From the New Editor From the New Editor (P. Iii). Philosophy of Science 72 (2).
     
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  14. Michael Dickson & Antony Valentini (2005). A Tribute to James T. Cushing: 1937–2002. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 35 (2):173-176.
  15. Michael Dickson (2004). A View From Nowhere: Quantum Reference Frames and Uncertainty. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 35 (2):195-220.
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  16. Michael Dickson (2004). Quantum Reference Frames in the Context of EPR. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):655-668.
    Taking a cue from Bohr’s use of the notion of a reference frame in his reply to EPR’s argument against the completeness (and consistency) of standard quantum theory, this paper presents an analysis ofthe role of reference frames in the situation considered by EPR, using a quantum‐theoretical account of physical reference frames based on the work of Mackey, and Aharonov and Kaufherr. That analysis appears to justify at least some crucial aspects of a Bohrian reply to EPR.
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  17. Michael Dickson, Don Howard, Scott Tanona, Mathias Frisch, Eric Winsberg, Arnold Koslow, Paul Teller, Ronald N. Giere, Mary S. Morgan & Mauricio Suárez (2004). 1. Preface Preface (P. Vii). Philosophy of Science 71 (5).
     
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  18. Michael Dickson (2002). Bohr on Bell: A Proposed Reading of Bohr and Its Implications for Bell's Theorem. In T. Placek & J. Butterfield (eds.), Non-Locality and Modality. Kluwer. 19--35.
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  19. Michael Dickson (2002). James T. Cushing, 1937–2002. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 33 (3):601-603.
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  20. David Wiggins, George Sherman Union, Mara Beller, Don Howard, Evelyn Fox Keller, Scott Gilbert, Margaret Morrison, Michael Dickson & Alisa Bokulich (2002). Boston Colloquium for Philosophy of Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 33:207-211.
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  21. Jeremy Butterfield, Constantine Pagonis & Michael Dickson (2001). Reviews-From Physics to Philosophy. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (2):397-400.
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  22. Michael Dickson (2001). From Physics to Philosophy Jeremy Butterfield, Constantine Pagonis. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (2):397-399.
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  23. Michael Dickson (2001). Partha Ghose Testing Quantum Mechanics on New Ground. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (1):207-209.
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  24. Michael Dickson (2001). Quantum Logic is Alive ∧ (It is True ∨ It is False). Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S274 - S287.
    Is the quantum-logic interpretation dead? Its near total absence from current discussions about the interpretation of quantum theory suggests so. While mathematical work on quantum logic continues largely unabated, interest in the quantum-logic interpretation seems to be almost nil, at least in Anglo-American philosophy of physics. This paper has the immodest purpose of changing that fact. I shall argue that while the quantum-logic interpretation faces challenges, it remains a live option. The usual objections either miss the mark, or admit a (...)
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  25. Michael Dickson (2001). Quantum Logic Is Alive [Logical And] (It Is True [Logical Or] It Is False). Philosophy of Science 68 (S1):S274-.
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  26. Partha Ghose & Michael Dickson (2001). Reviews-Testing Quantum Mechanics on New Ground. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (1):207-210.
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  27. Michael Dickson (2000). Are There Material Objects in Bohm's Theory? Philosophy of Science 67 (4):704-710.
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  28. Guido Bacciagaluppi & Michael Dickson (1999). Dynamics for Modal Interpretations. Foundations of Physics 29 (8):1165-1201.
    An outstanding problem in so-called modal interpretations of quantum mechanics has been the specification of a dynamics for the properties introduced in such interpretations. We develop a general framework (in the context of the theory of stochastic processes) for specifying a dynamics for interpretations in this class, focusing on the modal interpretation by Vermaas and Dieks. This framework admits many empirically equivalent dynamics. We give some examples, and discuss some of the properties of one of them. This approach is applicable (...)
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  29. Michael Dickson (1999). The Light at the End of the Tunneling: Observation and Underdetermination. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):58.
    If observation is 'theory-laden', how can there be 'observationally equivalent theories'? How can the observations 'laden' by one theory be 'the same as' those 'laden' by another? The answer might lie in the expressibility of observationally equivalent theories in a common mathematical formalism.
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  30. Michael Dickson (1999). Book Review:Interpreting the Quantum World Jeffrey Bub. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 66 (3):495-.
  31. Michael Dickson (1998). Review. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (2):329-331.
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  32. Michael Dickson (1997). Book Review:Quantum Non-Locality and Relativity: Metaphysical Intimations of Modern Physics Tim Maudlin. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 64 (3):516-.
  33. Tim Maudlin & Michael Dickson (1997). Quantum Non-Locality and Relativity: Metaphysical Implications of Modern Physics. Philosophy of Science 64 (3):515.
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  34. Michael Dickson (1996). A Model of the Universe. Space‐Time, Probability, and Decision. Philosophical Books 37 (2):134-136.
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  35. Michael Dickson (1996). Antidote or Theory? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 27 (2):229-238.
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  36. Michael Dickson (1996). Antidote or Theory?: David Bohm and Basil J. Hiley, The Undivided Universe: An Ontological Interpretation of Quantum Theory (London: Routledge, 1993), Xii+ 397 Pp. ISBN 0-415-06588-7. Peter R. Holland, The Quantum Theory of Motion: An Account of the de Broglie-Bohm Causal Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993 Hardback, 1995 Paperback), Xx+ 598 Pp. ISBN 0-521-35404-8 Hardback; 0-521-48543-6 Paperback. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 27 (2):229-238.
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  37. Michael Dickson (1996). Logical Foundations for Modal Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 63 (3):329.
    This paper proposes a logic, motivated by modal interpretations, in which every quantum mechanics propositions has a truth-value. This logic is completely classical, hence violates the conditions of the Kochen-Specker theorem. It is shown how the violation occurs, and it is argued that this violation is a natural and acceptable consequence of modal interpretations. It is shown that despite its classicality, the proposed logic is empirically indistinguishable from quantum logic.
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  38. Michael Dickson (1995). An Empirical Reply to Empiricism: Protective Measurement Opens the Door for Quantum Realism. Philosophy of Science 62 (1):122-140.
    Quantum mechanics has sometimes been taken to be an empiricist (vs. realist) theory. I state the empiricist's argument, then outline a recently noticed type of measurement--protective measurement--that affords a good reply for the realist. This paper is a reply to scientific empiricism (about quantum mechanics), but is neither a refutation of that position, nor an argument in favor of scientific realism. Rather, my aim is to place realism and empiricism on an even score in regards to quantum theory.
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  39. Michael Dickson (1995). What is Preferred About the Preferred Basis? Foundations of Physics 25 (3):423-440.
    I introduce and review the most recent and most promising model of state vector reduction, that of Ghirardi, Rimini, Weber, and Pearle. This model requires the specification of a reduction basis. At least two questions therefore arise: Are there physical reasons to choose one basis rather than another? Does the choice made lead to any undesirable consequences? I argue that there arephysical reasons to choose from a certain class of reduction bases (a class which includes the choice made by the (...)
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  40. Vassilios Karakostas & Michael Dickson (1995). Decoherence in Unorthodox Formulations of Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 102 (1):61 - 97.
    The conceptual structure of orthodox quantum mechanics has not provided a fully satisfactory and coherent description of natural phenomena. With particular attention to the measurement problem, we review and investigate two unorthodox formulations. First, there is the model advanced by GRWP, a stochastic modification of the standard Schrödinger dynamics admitting statevector reduction as a real physical process. Second, there is the ontological interpretation of Bohm, a causal reformulation of the usual theory admitting no collapse of the statevector. Within these two (...)
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  41. Michael Dickson (1994). Reply to H. Stapp's Comment. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (6):965-966.
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  42. Michael Dickson (1994). Wavefunction Tails in the Modal Interpretation. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:366 - 376.
    I review the modal interpretation of quantum mechanics, some versions of which rely on the biorthonormal decomposition of a statevector to determine which properties are physically possessed. Some have suggested that these versions fail in the case of inaccurate measurements, i.e., when one takes tails of the wavefunction into account. I show that these versions of the modal interpretation are satisfactory in such cases. I further suggest that a more general result is possible, namely, that these versions of the modal (...)
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  43. Michael Dickson (1993). Stapp's Theorem Without Counterfactual Commitments: Why It Fails Nonetheless. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 24 (5):791-814.
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