29 found
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  1.  6
    Michael Fagenblat, 'Fraternal Existence': On a Phenomenological Double-Crossing of Judaeo-Christianity.
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  2.  5
    Michael Fagenblat, 'Heidegger' and the Jews.
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  3.  4
    Michael Fagenblat (2010). A Covenant of Creatures: Levinas's Philosophy of Judaism. Stanford University Press.
    Rejecting the distinction Levinas asserted between Judaism and philosophy, this book reads his philosophical works, "Totality and Infinity" and "Otherwise than ...
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  4.  7
    Michael Fagenblat, Frankism and Frankfurtism: Historical Heresies for a Metaphysics of Our Most Human Experiences.
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  5. Michael Fagenblat (2010). Converts, Heretics, and Lepers: Maimonides and the Outsider (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (2):pp. 240-241.
    This study builds upon the novel hermeneutical approach to Maimonides' Guide of the Perplexed first developed by the author in a previous work, Maimonides and the Hermeneutics of Concealment . That study made two principal contributions. First, it displaced the common view of Maimonides as imposing philosophical categories onto biblical and rabbinic texts that are themselves intrinsically unphilosophical. Rather, as Diamond showed, what is often regarded as an allegorical abstraction from text to concept is, on closer scrutiny, a midrashic displacement (...)
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  6.  14
    Michael Fagenblat (2015). ‘The Passion of Israel’: The True Israel According to Levinas, or Judaism ‘as a Category of Being’. Sophia 54 (3):297-320.
    Across four decades of writing, Levinas repeatedly referred to the Holocaust as ‘the Passion of Israel at Auschwitz’. This deliberately Christological interpretation of the Holocaust raises questions about the respective roles of Judaism and Christianity in Levinas’ thought and seems at odds with his well-known view that suffering is ‘useless’. Basing my interpretation on the journals Levinas wrote as a prisoner of war and a radio talk he delivered in September 1945, I argue that his philosophical project is best understood (...)
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  7.  15
    Michael Fagenblat, Levinas, Judaism, Heidegger.
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  8.  16
    Michael Fagenblat (2013). The Monstrosity of Christ: Paradox or Dialectic? Common Knowledge 19 (1):136-137.
  9.  16
    Michael Fagenblat (2009). Jewish Philosophy as a Guide to Life: Rosenzweig, Buber, Levinas, Wittgenstein. Common Knowledge 15 (2):218-218.
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  10.  13
    Michael Fagenblat (2013). The Faith of the Faithless: Experiments in Political Theology. Common Knowledge 19 (3):565-566.
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  11.  4
    Michael Fagenblat (2015). Manifest Glory: Phenomenological Indications From the Hebrew Bible. Sophia 54 (4):497-511.
    I offer a phenomenological analysis of the syntagm ‘glory of Yhwh’ which appears in relatively few but significant places in the Hebrew Bible. I discuss the biblical sense of this syntagm and make the argument for understanding it as a ‘formally indicative’ concept, in Heidegger’s sense of ‘formale Anzeige’. I thereby make the case for understanding the anthropomorphic, amoral and numinous qualities of the biblical syntagm in a way that illuminates contemporary phenomenological senses of being, including contingency, unforeseeability, respect, dignity, (...)
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  12.  60
    Michael Fagenblat (2008). Levinas and Maimonides: From Metaphysics to Ethical Negative Theology. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 16 (1):95-147.
    After an initially sympathetic reading of Maimonides, Levinas develops an ambivalent attitude toward the Great Eagle, whom he views as a champion of intellectualist Judaism. Nevertheless, insights from the early engagement with Maimonides are carried forth into the central claims of Totality and Infinity regarding freedom, creation, particularity and transcendence. Levinas' arguments are directed at Heidegger but can also be seen as a phenomenological repetition of the medieval dispute about the eternity of the world. Later, Levinas continues this engagement with (...)
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  13.  11
    Michael Fagenblat (2009). The Unthought Debt: Heidegger and the Hebraic Heritage. Common Knowledge 15 (3):507-508.
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  14.  5
    Michael Fagenblat (2005). James Arthur Diamond, Maimonides and the Hermeneutics of Concealment: Deciphering Scripture and Midrash in the “Guide of the Perplexed.” (SUNY Series in Jewish Philosophy.) Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2002. Pp. X, 235. $62.50 (Cloth); $20.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 80 (4):1263-1265.
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  15.  33
    Michael Fagenblat (2002). Il Y a du Quotidien: Levinas and Heidegger on the Self. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (5):578-604.
    Levinas's notion of il y a (there is) existence is shown to be the organizing principle behind his challenge to Being and Time. The two main aspects of that challenge propose an ontology that is not entirely reduced to being-in-the-world and a correlative account of the self that is not entirely reduced to context. In that way Levinas attempts first to restore unconditional value to the self and then to 'produce' a pluralist social ontology based on the independence of persons. (...)
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  16.  4
    Michael Fagenblat (2007). Kenneth Seeskin, Maimonides on the Origin of the World. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Pp. Viii, 215. $55. [REVIEW] Speculum 82 (1):236-238.
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  17.  5
    Michael Fagenblat (2002). Being Singular Plural (Review). Common Knowledge 8 (1):210-210.
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  18.  6
    Michael Fagenblat (2004). Phenomenology and the “Theological Turn”: The French Debate. Common Knowledge 10 (2):354-355.
  19.  5
    Michael Fagenblat (2008). Menachem Kellner, Maimonides' Confrontation with Mysticism. Oxford and Portland, Oreg.: The Littman Library of Jewish Civilization, 2007. Pp. Xix, 343. $49.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (4):1016-1017.
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  20.  1
    Michael Fagenblat (2013). The Faith of the Faithless: Experiments in Political Theology by Simon Critchley (Review). Common Knowledge 19 (3):565-566.
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  21. Michael Fagenblat (2005). Back to the Other Levinas: Alain P. Toumayan's Encountering the Other: The Artwork and the Problem of Difference in Blanchot and Levinas. Colloquy 10:298-313.
    Pittsburgh, Penn.: Duquesne U. P., 2004. ISBN: 0 8207 0347 8. Since the exultant reception of Levinas’ work, particularly in the United States, an imposing obstacle to this oeuvre has steadily been erected. It is not Levinas’ complicated, often unstated philosophical disputations, nor his exhortatory style, nor even the originality of his argument that constitute the most formidable obstructions to his work today. On the contrary, the greatest difficulty today is the ease with which Levinas is arrogated, a facility that (...)
     
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  22. Michael Fagenblat (2006). Herbert A. Davidson, Moses Maimonides: The Man and His Works. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2005. Pp. X, 567. $45. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (3):831-833.
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  23. Michael Fagenblat (2005). Maimonides and the Hermeneutics of Concealment: Deciphering Scripture and Midrash in the "Guide of the Perplexed"James Arthur Diamond. Speculum 80 (4):1263-1265.
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  24. Michael Fagenblat (2008). Maimonides' Confrontation with MysticismMenachem Kellner. Speculum 83 (4):1016-1017.
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  25. Michael Fagenblat (2006). Moses Maimonides: The Man and His WorksHerbert A. Davidson. Speculum 81 (3):831-833.
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  26. Michael Fagenblat (2007). Maimonides on the Origin of the WorldKenneth Seeskin. Speculum 82 (1):236-238.
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  27. Michael Fagenblat (ed.) (2017). Negative Theology as Jewish Modernity. Indiana University Press.
    Negative theology is the attempt to describe God by speaking in terms of what God is not. Historical affinities between Jewish modernity and negative theology indicate new directions for thematizing the modern Jewish experience. Questions such as, What are the limits of Jewish modernity in terms of negativity? Has this creative tradition exhausted itself? and How might Jewish thought go forward? anchor these original essays. Taken together they explore the roots and legacies of negative theology in Jewish thought, examine the (...)
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  28. Kenneth Seeskin & Michael Fagenblat (2007). REVIEWS-Maimonides on the Origin of the World. Speculum 82 (1):236.
     
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  29. Nick Trakakis & Michael Fagenblat, Levinas in John Mullarkey and Beth Lord (Editors) the Continuum Companion to Continental Philosophy.