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Michael Harré [3]Michael S. Harré [1]
  1. Michael Harre (2013). The Neural Circuitry of Expertise: Perceptual Learning and Social Cognition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:852.
    Amongst the most significant questions we are confronted with today include the integration of the brain's micro-circuitry, our ability to build the complex social networks that underpin society and how our society impacts on our ecological environment. In trying to unravel these issues one place to begin is at the level of the individual: to consider how we accumulate information about our environment, how this information leads to decisions and how our individual decisions in turn create our social environment. While (...)
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  2. Michael S. Harré (2013). From Amateur to Professional: A Neuro-Cognitive Model of Categories and Expert Development. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 23 (4):443-472.
    The ability to group perceptual objects into functionally relevant categories is vital to our comprehension of the world. Such categorisation aids in how we search for objects in familiar scenes and how we identify an object and its likely uses despite never having seen that specific object before. The systems that mediate this process are only now coming to be understood through considerable research efforts combining neurological, psychological and behavioural studies. What is much less well understood are the differences between (...)
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  3. Michael Harré & Allan Snyder (2012). Intuitive Expertise and Perceptual Templates. Minds and Machines 22 (3):167-182.
    We provide the first demonstration of an artificial neural network encoding the perceptual templates that form an important component of the high level strategic understanding developed by experts. Experts have a highly refined sense of knowing where to look, what information is important and what information to ignore. The conclusions these experts reach are of a higher quality and typically made in a shorter amount of time than those of non-experts. Understanding the manifestation of such abilities in terms of both (...)
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  4. Michael Harré, Terry Bossomaier & Allan Snyder (2011). The Development of Human Expertise in a Complex Environment. Minds and Machines 21 (3):449-464.
    We introduce an innovative technique that quantifies human expertise development in such a way that humans and artificial systems can be directly compared. Using this technique we are able to highlight certain fundamental difficulties associated with the learning of a complex task that humans are still exceptionally better at than their computer counterparts. We demonstrate that expertise goes through significant developmental transitions that have previously been predicted but never explicated. The first signals the onset of a steady increase in global (...)
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