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Profile: Michael Hauskeller (University of Exeter)
  1. Michael Hauskeller (forthcoming). Being Queasy About Reconstructing Animals. Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics.
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  2. Michael Hauskeller (2014). Better Humans?: Understanding the Enhancement Project. Routledge.
    Developments in medical science have afforded us the opportunity to improve and enhance the human species in ways unthinkable to previous generations. Whether it's making changes to mitochondrial DNA in a human egg, being prescribed Prozac, or having a facelift, our desire to live longer, feel better and look good has presented philosophers, medical practitioners and policy-makers with considerable ethical challenges. But what exactly constitutes human improvement? What do we mean when we talk of making "better" humans? In this book (...)
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  3. Michael Hauskeller (2013). The Authors Reply. Hastings Center Report 43 (1):6-7.
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  4. Michael Hauskeller (2013). The “Little Alex” Problem. The Philosophers' Magazine 62 (62):74-78.
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  5. Michael Hauskeller (2012). Believing in the Dignity of Human Embryos. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):53-65.
    After showing that despite being inherently flawed the concept of dignity cannot be replaced without loss by ethical principles such as “respect for persons,” it is argued that, if dignity be not understood as dignitas, but as bonitas, which emphasizes connectedness rather than excellence and to which the proper response is not respect, but awe, there is no reason not to ascribe it to the human embryo. The question whether or not human embryos have dignity can then be answered in (...)
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  6. Michael Hauskeller (2012). My Brain, My Mind, and I: Some Philosophical Assumptions of Mind-Uploading. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (01):187-200.
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  7. Michael Hauskeller (2012). Reinventing Cockaigne. Hastings Center Report 42 (2):39-47.
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  8. Michael Hauskeller (2011). Forever Young? Life Extension and the Ageing Mind. Ethical Perspectives 18 (3):385-405.
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  9. Michael Hauskeller (2011). Human Enhancement and the Giftedness of Life. Philosophical Papers 40 (1):55-79.
    Michael Sandel's opposition to the project of human enhancement is based on an argument that centres on the notion of giftedness. Sandel claims that by trying to ?make better people? we fall prey to, and encourage, an attitude of mastery and thus lose, or diminish, our appreciation of the giftedness of life. Sandel's position and the underlying argument have been much criticised. In this paper I will try to make sense of Sandel's reasoning and give an account of giftedness that (...)
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  10. Michael Hauskeller (2011). No Philosophy for Swine: John Stuart Mill on the Quality of Pleasures. Utilitas 23 (04):428-446.
    I argue that Mill introduced the distinction between quality and quantity of pleasures in order to fend off the then common charge that utilitarianism is ‘a philosophy for swine’ and to accommodate the (still) widespread intuition that the life of a human is better, in the sense of being intrinsically more valuable, than the life of an animal. I argue that in this he fails because in order to do successfully he would have to show not only that the life (...)
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  11. Michael Hauskeller (2010). Nietzsche, the Overhuman and Posthuman. Journal of Evolution and Technology 21 (1):1.
    -/- Sorgner (2009, 29) has argued that Bostrom (2005, 4) was wrong to maintain that there are only surface-level similarities between Nietzsche’s vision of the overman, or overhuman, and the transhumanist conception of the posthuman. Rather, he claims, the similarities are “significant” and can be found “on a fundamental level”. However, I think that Bostrom was in fact quite right to dismiss Nietzsche as a major inspiration for transhumanism. There may be some common ground, but there are also essential differences, (...)
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  12. Michael Hauskeller (2010). Why Buridan's Ass Doesn't Starve. Philosophy Now 81:9-9.
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  13. Michael Hauskeller (2009). Making Sense of What We Are: A Mythological Approach to Human Nature. Philosophy 84 (1):95-109.
    The question what makes us human is often treated as a question of fact. However, the term 'human' is not primarily used to refer to a particular kind of entity, but as a 'nomen dignitatis' -- a dignity-conferring name. It implies a particular moral status. That is what spawns endless debates about such issues as when human life begins and ends and whether human-animal chimeras are "partly human". Definitions of the human are inevitably "persuasive". They tell us about what is (...)
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  14. Michael Hauskeller (2009). Prometheus Unbound. Ethical Perspectives 16 (1):3-20.
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  15. Michael Hauskeller (2007). The Reification of Life. Genomics, Society and Policy 3 (2):70-81.
    ‘What’s wrong – fundamentally wrong – with the way animals are treated (…) isn’t the pain, the suffering, isn’t the deprivation. (…) The fundamental wrong is the system that allows us to view animals as our resources, here for us – to be eaten, or surgically manipulated, or exploited for sport or money.’\n\nTom Regan made this claim 20 years ago. What he maintains is basically that the fundamental wrong is not the suffering we inflict on animals but the way we (...)
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  16. Michael Hauskeller (2006). Moral Disgust. Ethical Perspectives 13 (4):571-602.
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  17. Michael Hauskeller (2005). Review of Nicholas Agar, Liberal Eugenics: In Defence of Human Enhancement. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (11).
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  18. Michael Hauskeller (2005). Telos: The Revival of an Aristotelian Concept in Present Day Ethics. Inquiry 48 (1):62 – 75.
    Genetic engineering is often looked upon with disfavour on the grounds that it involves "tampering with nature". Most philosophers do not take this notion seriously. However, some do. Those who do tend to understand nature in an Aristotelian sense, as the essence or form which is the final end or telos for the sake of which individual organisms live, and which also explains why they are as they are. But is this really a tenable idea? In order to secure its (...)
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  19. Michael Hauskeller (2004). The Experience Machine. Think 3 (8):35.
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  20. Michael Hauskeller (2004). Christian Illies, The Grounds of Ethical Judgement: New Transcendental Arguments in Moral Philosophy:The Grounds of Ethical Judgement: New Transcendental Arguments in Moral Philosophy. Ethics 114 (4):823-827.
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  21. Michael Hauskeller (2003). Durch Leiden lernen. Schopenhauer zwischen Mitleid und Weltüberwindung. Schopenhauer Jahrbuch 84:75-90.
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  22. Gregor Schiemann, Michael Hauskeller & Christoph Rehmann-Sutter (eds.) (1998). Naturerkenntnis und Natursein. Suhrkamp.
    Der Titel dieses Bandes charakterisiert zentrale Themen des Philosophierens von Gernot Böhme, das weit über die Grenzen der akademischen Disziplin hinaus Beachtung und Anerkennung gefunden hat. In der Vielfalt seiner fachphilosophischen Publikationen und seines essayistischen Werkes nimmt das Bemühen und eine Neugestaltung des Verhältnisses von Mensch und Natur eine herausragende Stellung ein. Indem dieser Band sich auf das Verhältnis von Naturerkennen und Natursein konzentriert, thematisiert er einen wesentlichen Aussschnitt aus dem weiten Spektrum von Böhmes philosophischer Arbeit. Die Naturthematik ist mit (...)
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  23. Michael Hauskeller (1997). Natur als Bild. In Gregor Schiemann & Gernot Böhme (eds.), Phänomenologie der Natur. Shrkamp. 1325--120.
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  24. Michael Hauskeller (1997). Rezension von Zygmunt Baumans „Postmoderne Ethik “. Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 50:43-46.
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