Search results for 'Michael J. Denton' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael J. Denton, Govindasamy Kumaramanickavel & Michael Legge (2013). Cells as Irreducible Wholes: The Failure of Mechanism and the Possibility of an Organicist Revival. Biology and Philosophy 28 (1):31-52.score: 870.0
    According to vitalism, living organisms differ from machines and all other inanimate objects by being endowed with an indwelling immaterial directive agency, ‘vital force,’ or entelechy . While support for vitalism fell away in the late nineteenth century many biologists in the early twentieth century embraced a non vitalist philosophy variously termed organicism/holism/emergentism which aimed at replacing the actions of an immaterial spirit with what was seen as an equivalent but perfectly natural agency—the emergent autonomous activity of the whole organism. (...)
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  2. Marie I. George (2001). Nature's Destiny: How the Laws of Biology Reveal Purpose in the Universe. By Michael J. Denton. New York: The Free Press, 1998. [REVIEW] The Thomist 65:323-326.score: 450.0
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  3. J. B. Edelmann & M. J. Denton (2007). The Uniqueness of Biological Self-Organization: Challenging the Darwinian Paradigm. Biology and Philosophy 22 (4):579-601.score: 240.0
    Here we discuss the challenge posed by self-organization to the Darwinian conception of evolution. As we point out, natural selection can only be the major creative agency in evolution if all or most of the adaptive complexity manifest in living organisms is built up over many generations by the cumulative selection of naturally occurring small, random mutations or variants, i.e., additive, incremental steps over an extended period of time. Biological self-organization—witnessed classically in the folding of a protein, or in the (...)
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  4. D. A. Denton, M. J. McKinley, M. Farrell & G. F. Egan (2009). The Role of Primordial Emotions in the Evolutionary Origin of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):500-514.score: 240.0
  5. D. A. Denton, J. R. Blair‐West, M. J. McKinley & J. F. Nelson (1986). Problems and Paradigms: Physiological Analysis of Bone Appetite (Osteophagia). Bioessays 4 (1):40-43.score: 240.0
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  6. James Wayne Dye (1970). Denton J. Snider's Interpretation of Hegel. Modern Schoolman 47 (2):153-167.score: 120.0
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  7. Michael Ruse (ed.) (2007). Philosophy of Biology. Prometheus Books.score: 90.0
    Biologists study life in its various physical forms, while philosophers of biology seek answers to questions about the nature, purpose, and impact of this research. What permits us to distinguish between living and nonliving things even though both are made of the same minerals? Is the complex structure of organisms proof that a creative force is working its will in the physical universe, or are existing life-forms the random result of an evolutionary process working itself out over eons of time? (...)
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  8. Glenn Parsons (2008). Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Aesthetics of Nature. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1106-1112.score: 81.0
    Traditionally, analytic philosophers writing on aesthetics have given short shrift to nature. The last thirty years, however, have seen a steady growth of interest in this area. The essays and books now available cover central philosophical issues concerning the nature of the aesthetic and the existence of norms for aesthetic judgement. They also intersect with important issues in environmental philosophy. More recent contributions have opened up new topics, such as the relationship between natural sound and music, the beauty of animals, (...)
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  9. David B. Myers (2000). New Design Arguments: Old Millian Objections. Religious Studies 36 (2):141-162.score: 81.0
    An increasing number of natural scientists are doubling as natural theologians. I critically examine two recent defences of the design argument by biologists: "Darwin's Black Box" by Michael Behe and "Nature's Destiny" by Michael Denton. Each claims that recent findings in biology provide new evidence for belief in a supernatural designer. For the sake of argument, I grant both the validity and soundness of their arguments. What I then try to show is that even if we grant (...)
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  10. Mark I. Vuletic (2000). Destined for Greatness. Philo 3 (2):89-103.score: 24.0
    In an expansion of the fine-tuning argument, Michael Denton argues that every aspect of the universe is ideally suited for the production and maintenance of familiar and anthropomorphic forms of life. He further argues that the ideal nature of these aspects is extremely improbable unless one postulates a designer who tooled them for the express purpose of producing familiar and anthropomorphic life. I point out shortcomings in Denton’s line of argument, focusing in particular on the premise that (...)
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  11. Charles Milton Perry (1930). The St. Louis Movement in Philosophy. Norman, University of Oklahoma Press.score: 24.0
    The movement and its members.--H. C. Brokmeyer.--W. T. Harris.--Denton J. Snider.--Bibliography.
     
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  12. George J. Stack (1974). "La 'Possibilità' in Nicola Abbagnano," by Adriana Dentone. Modern Schoolman 51 (2):178-180.score: 12.0
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