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  1. Michael J. Fitzgerald (forthcoming). The 'Mysterious' Thomas Manlevelt and Albert of Saxony. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-18.
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  2. Michael J. Fitzgerald (2012). Unconfusing Merely Confused Supposition in Albert of Saxony. Vivarium 50 (2):161-189.
    In this essay I argue that Albert would reject the need for a separate fourth mode of common personal supposition, and that his view of merely confused supposition has not been fully explicated by modern scholars. I first examine the various examples of conjunct descent given by modern scholars from his Perutilis logica , and show that Albert clearly adopts it in resolving the sophistic examples involved. Second, I explicate the view of merely confused supposition that Albert defends in his (...)
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  3. Michael J. Fitzgerald (2009). Time as a Part of Physical Objects: The Modern 'Descartes-Minus Argument' and an Analogous Argument From Fourteenth-Century Logic (William Heytesbury and Albert of Saxony). Vivarium 47 (1):54-73.
  4. Michael J. Fitzgerald (2008). Logic and Ontology in the Syllogistic of Robert Kilwardby. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 482-483.
  5. Michael J. Fitzgerald (2006). Problems with Temporality and Scientific Propositions in John Buridan and Albert of Saxony. Vivarium 44 (s 2-3):305-337.
    The essay develops two major arguments. First, if John Buridan's 'first argument' for the reintroduction of natural supposition is only that the "eternal truth" of a scientific proposition is preserved because subject terms in scientific propositions supposit for all the term's past, present, and future significata indifferently; then Albert of Saxony thinks it is simply ineffective. Only the 'second argument', i.e. the argument for the existence of an 'atemporal copula', adequately performs this task; but is rejected by Albert. Second, later (...)
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  6. Michael J. Fitzgerald (2003). The Medieval Roots of Reliabilist Epistemology: Albert of Saxony's View of Immediate Apprehension. Synthese 136 (3):409 - 434.
    In the essay I first argue that Albert ofSaxony's defense of perceptual ``directrealism'' is in fact a forerunner of contemporaryforms of ``process reliabilist''epistemologies. Second, I argue that Albert's defenseof perceptual direct realism has aninteresting consequence for his philosophy oflanguage. His semantic notion of `naturalsignification' does not require any semanticintermediary entity called a `concept' or`description', to function as the directsignificatum of written or spoken termsfor them to designate perceptual objects. AlthoughAlbert is inspired by Ockham's mentalact theory, I conclude that Albert seemsto (...)
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  7. Michael J. Fitzgerald (1990). The Real Difficulty with Burley's Realistic Semantics. Vivarium 28 (1):17-25.
  8. Willemien Otten, Michael J. Fitzgerald & C. H. Kneepkens (1990). Brill Online Books and Journals. Vivarium 28 (1).
     
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  9. Michael J. Fitzgerald (1984). An Interpretative Dilemma in Burlean Semantics. Franciscan Studies 44 (1):181-192.
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  10. Michael J. Fitzgerald (1978). Ockham's Implicit Priority of Analysis Rule? Franciscan Studies 38 (1):213-219.
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