35 found
Sort by:
  1. Michael J. Murray (2010). Evolutionary Accounts of Religion: Explaining or Explaining Away. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. 472--478.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * Notes * References.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Michael J. Murray (2010). Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Michael J. Murray (2010). The Evolution of Religion: Adaptationist Accounts. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. 437--457.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * I Introduction * II One Preliminary * III Adaptationist Theories * IV Punishment Theories * V Commitment Signaling * VI Group Selection * V Conclusion * Notes * References.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Michael J. Murray (2009). Coercion and the Hiddennessofgod. In Kevin Timpe (ed.), Arguing About Religion. Routledge. 282.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Michael J. Murray (2009). Scientific Explanations of Religion and the Justification of Religious Belief. In Michael J. Murray & Jeffrey Schloss (eds.), The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press. 168.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001788486; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 168-178.; Language(s): English; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Michael J. Murray & Jeffrey Schloss (eds.) (2009/2010). The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press.
    Over the last two decades, scientific accounts of religion have received a great deal of scholarly and popular attention both because of their intrinsic interest and because they are widely as constituting a threat to the religion they analyse. The Believing Primate aims to describe and discuss these scientific accounts as well as to assess their implications. The volume begins with essays by leading scientists in the field, describing these accounts and discussing evidence in their favour. Philosophical and theological reflections (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jeffrey P. Schloss & Michael J. Murray (2009). You Can't Always Get What You Want: Evolution and True Beliefs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (6):533-534.
    McKay & Dennett (M&D) convincingly argue against many proposals for adaptively functioning misbelief, but the conclusion that true beliefs are generally adaptive does not follow. Adaptive misbeliefs may be few in kind but many in number; maladaptive misbeliefs may routinely elude selective pruning; reproductively neutral misbeliefs may abound; and adaptively grounded beliefs may reliably covary with but not truthfully represent reality.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jeffrey Schloss & Michael J. Murray (eds.) (2009/2010). The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press.
    Over the last two decades, scientific accounts of religion have received a great deal of scholarly and popular attention both because of their intrinsic interest and because they are widely as constituting a threat to the religion they analyse. The Believing Primate aims to describe and discuss these scientific accounts as well as to assess their implications. The volume begins with essays by leading scientists in the field, describing these accounts and discussing evidence in their favour. Philosophical and theological reflections (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Michael J. Murray (2008). Leibniz - by Nicholas Jolley. Philosophical Books 49 (1):50-52.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Michael J. Murray (2008). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. Cambridge University Press.
    Attributes of God : independence, goodness, and power -- Attributes of God : eternity, knowledge, and providence -- God triune and incarnate -- Faith and rationality -- Theistic arguments -- Anti-theistic arguments -- Religion and science -- Religion, morality, and politics -- Mind, body, and immortality.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Michael J. Murray (2008). Nature Red in Tooth and Claw: Theism and the Problem of Animal Suffering. Oxford University Press.
    Problems of and explanations for evil -- Neo-cartesianism -- Animal suffering and the fall -- Nobility, flourishing, and immortality : animal pain and animal well-being -- Natural evil, nomic regularity, and animal suffering -- Chaos, order, and evolution -- Combining CDs.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Michael J. Murray (2008). Theodicy. In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Michael J. Murray (2006). Leibniz and His Correspondents. The Leibniz Review 16:105-112.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Michael J. Murray (2006). Natural Providence: Reply to Dembski. Faith and Philosophy 23 (3):337.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Michael J. Murray (2005). Introduction. Faith and Philosophy 22 (5):515-520.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Michael J. Murray (2005). Spontaneity and Freedom in Leibniz. In Donald Rutherford & J. A. Cover (eds.), Leibniz: Nature and Freedom. Oxford University Press. 194--216.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Michael J. Murray (2004). Pre-Leibnizian Moral Necessity. The Leibniz Review 14:1-28.
    The mature Leibniz frequently uses the phrase “moral necessity” in the context of discussing free choice. In this essay I provide a seventeenth century geneology of the phrase. I show that the doctrine of moral necessity was developed by scholastic philosophers who sought to retain a robust notion of freedom while purging bruteness from their systems. Two sorts of bruteness were special targets. The first is metaphysical bruteness, according to which contingent events or states of affairs occur without a sufficient (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Michael J. Murray (2003). Leibniz's Metaphysics. Philosophical Review 112 (2):270-273.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Michael J. Murray (2003). Natural Providence (Or Design Trouble). Faith and Philosophy 20 (3):307-327.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Michael J. Murray (2002). Deus absconditus. In Daniel Howard-Snyder & Paul K. Moser (eds.), Divine Hiddenness: New Essays. Cambridge University Press. 63.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Michael J. Murray (2002). Leibniz's Proposal for Theological Reconciliation Among the Protestants. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (4):623-646.
    Between 1701 and 1705 Leibniz focused on the task of securing theological reunion between Lutherans and Calvinists, the two major Protestant sects at the time. Doing so, he believed, required reconciliation on two key topics, namely, the doctrine of the Eucharist, and the doctrine of election. To bring unity on the second issue, Leibniz composed a lengthy treatise based on a commentary on the Thirty-nine articles of the Church of England. This treatise stakes out a position springing from Leibniz’s own (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Michael J. Murray (2002). Review of Peter Geach, Truth and Hope: The Furst Franz Josef Und Furstin Gina Lectures Delivered at the International Academy of Philosophy, 1998. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (2).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Michael J. Murray (2002). The Problem of Evil in Early Modern Philosophy. The Leibniz Review 12:103-106.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Michael J. Murray (2000). Critical Review of Cover and Hawthorne on Leibnizian Modality. The Leibniz Review 10:73-86.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Michael J. Murray (1999). Alternative Perspectives. In Eleonore Stump & Michael J. Murray (eds.), Philosophy of Religion: The Big Questions. Blackwell Publishers. 6--241.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Michael J. Murray (1999). Three Versions of Universalism. Faith and Philosophy 16 (1):55-68.
    In recent years a number of sophisticated versions of soteriological universalism have appeared in the literature. In this essay I offer some critical retlections them. In particular, I argue that universalism offers no explanation for the fact that God puts human creatures through the earthly life, and that if there is no such reason then the earthly life and the evil it contains are both gratuitous. Finally, I argue that universalists are obliged to deny that human beings have a centrally (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Eleonore Stump & Michael J. Murray (eds.) (1999). Philosophy of Religion: The Big Questions. Blackwell Publishers.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Michael J. Murray (1996). Leibniz. Faith and Philosophy 13 (3):426-435.
  29. Are Coerced Acts Free & Michael J. Murray (1995). Non-Intentional Actions, DAVID K. CHAN. American Philosophical Quarterly 32 (2).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Michael J. Murray (1995). Leibniz on Divine Foreknowledge of Future Contingents and Human Freedom. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (1):75-108.
  31. Michael J. Murray & David F. Dudrick (1995). Are Coerced Acts Free? American Philosophical Quarterly 32 (2):109 - 123.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Michael J. Murray (1994). Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. The Leibniz Review 4:2-5.
  33. Michael J. Murray (1994). Intellect, Will, and Freedom in Leibniz. The Leibniz Review 4:11-12.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Michael J. Murray & Kurt Meyers (1994). Ask and It Will Be Given to You. Religious Studies 30 (3):311 - 330.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Michael J. Murray (1993). Coercion and the Hiddenness of God. American Philosophical Quarterly 30 (1):27 - 38.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation