5 found
Sort by:
See also:
  1. Michael J. Richardson & Brent D. Slife (2013). A 'Narrowing of Inquiry' in American Moral Psychology and Education. Journal of Moral Education 42 (2):193-208.
    We explore the possibility that a priori philosophical commitments continue to result in a narrowing of inquiry in moral psychology and education where theistic worldviews are concerned. Drawing from the theories of Edward L. Thorndike and John Dewey, we examine naturalistic philosophical commitments that influenced the study of moral psychology and moral education in the USA. We then address the question of whether these foundational naturalistic commitments can be rendered as compatible with theistic commitments, using both modernist and postmodern philosophical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Michael L. Anderson, Michael J. Richardson & Anthony Chemero (2012). Eroding the Boundaries of Cognition: Implications of Embodiment1. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):717-730.
    To accept that cognition is embodied is to question many of the beliefs traditionally held by cognitive scientists. One key question regards the localization of cognitive faculties. Here we argue that for cognition to be embodied and sometimes embedded, means that the cognitive faculty cannot be localized in a brain area alone. We review recent research on neural reuse, the 1/f structure of human activity, tool use, group cognition, and social coordination dynamics that we believe demonstrates how the boundary between (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Kerry L. Marsh, Michael J. Richardson & R. C. Schmidt (2009). Social Connection Through Joint Action and Interpersonal Coordination. Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (2):320-339.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Michael J. Richardson & Claire F. Michaels (2001). The Event-Code: Not the Solution to a Problem, but a Problem to Be Solved. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):901-902.
    We commend the argument that perception and action are tightly coupled. We claim that the argument is not new, that uniting stimulus and response codes is not a problem for a cognitive system, only for psychologists who assume them, and that the Theory of Event Coding (TEC)'s event-codes are arbitrary and ungrounded. Affordances and information offer the common basis for perception-action (and even for event-codes).
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation