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  1.  3
    John D. Caputo & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (1999). God, the Gift, and Postmodernism. Indiana University Press.
    Pushing past the constraints of postmodernism which cast "reason" and"religion" in opposition, God, the Gift, and Postmodernism, seizes the opportunity to question the authority of "the modern" and open the limits of possible experience, including the call to religious experience, as a new millennium approaches. Jacques Derrida, the father of deconstruction, engages with Jean-Luc Marion and other religious philosophers to entertain questions about intention, givenness, and possibility which reveal the extent to which deconstruction is structured like religion. New interpretations of (...)
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  2.  2
    John D. Caputo, Mark Dooley & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (2001). Questioning God. Indiana University Press.
    Questioning God moves readers beyond the parameters of metaphysical reason and modernist rationality as it attempts to think the questions of God and forgiveness in a postmodernist context.
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  3.  9
    James Bohman, Thomas C. Brickhouse, Nicholas D. Smith, Alan Brinkley, Tex Waco, James M. Buchanan, Richard A. Musgrave, John D. Caputo, Michael J. Scanlon & Christopher Cox (2001). G. John M. Abbarno, The Ethics of Homelessness. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1999, 258 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 90-420-0777-X, $22.00 (Pb). Robert B. Baker, Arthur L. Caplan, Linda L. Emanuel and Stephen R. Latham, Eds., The American Medical Ethics Revolution. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999, 396 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-8018-6170. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 35:285-289.
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  4.  2
    John D. Caputo, Mark Dooley & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (2001). Questioning God. Indiana University Press.
    In 15 insightful essays, Jacques Derrida and an international group of scholars of religion explore postmodern thinking about God and consider the nature of forgiveness in relation to the paradoxes of the gift. Among the themes addressed by contributors are the possibilities of imagining God as unthinkable, imagining God as non-patriarchal, imagining a return to Augustine, and imagining an age in which praise is far more important than narrative. Questioning God moves readers beyond the parameters of metaphysical reason and modernist (...)
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  5.  12
    Michael J. Scanlon (1994). Augustine and Theology as Rhetoric. Augustinian Studies 25:37-50.
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  6.  5
    John D. Caputo, Mark Dooley, Michael J. Scanlon, Christopher Key Chapple, Sarah Coakley, Simon Critchley & Robert Bernasconi (2003). Achtner, Wolfgang, Stefan Kunz and Thomas Walter (2002) Dimensions of Time: The Structures of the Time of Humans, of the World, and of God. Grand Rapid, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, $30.00, 196 Pp. Anidjar, Gil (2002)“Our Place in Al-Andalus”: Kabbalah, Philosophy. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 53:195-199.
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  7.  1
    John D. Caputo & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (1999). God, the Gift, and Postmodernism. Indiana University Press.
    Pushing past the constraints of postmodernism which cast "reason" and"religion" in opposition, God, the Gift, and Postmodernism, seizes the opportunity to question the authority of "the modern" and open the limits of possible experience, including the call to religious experience, as a new millennium approaches. Jacques Derrida, the father of deconstruction, engages with Jean-Luc Marion and other religious philosophers to entertain questions about intention, givenness, and possibility which reveal the extent to which deconstruction is structured like religion. New interpretations of (...)
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  8.  6
    Michael J. Scanlon (1989). The Augustinian Tradition. Augustinian Studies 20:61-92.
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  9. Rex Butler, John D. Caputo, Michael J. Scanlon, Tina Chanter, Ewa Plonowska Ziarek & Jeanine Grenberg (2005). James W. Allard, The Logical Foundations of Bradley's Metaphysics: Judgment, Inference, and Truth (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005). Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 26 (2).
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  10.  2
    John D. Caputo & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (2005). Augustine and Postmodernism: Confessions and Circumfession. Indiana University Press.
    At the heart of the current surge of interest in religion among contemporary Continental philosophers stands Augustine’s Confessions. With Derrida’s Circumfession constantly in the background, this volume takes up the provocative readings of Augustine by Heidegger, Lyotard, Arendt, and Ricoeur. Derrida himself presides over and comments on essays by major Continental philosophers and internationally recognized Augustine scholars. While studies on and about Augustine as a philosopher abound, none approach his work from such a uniquely postmodern point of view, showing both (...)
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  11. John D. Caputo & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (2005). Augustine and Postmodernism: Confessions and Circumfession. Indiana University Press.
    At the heart of the current surge of interest in religion among contemporary Continental philosophers stands Augustine’s Confessions. With Derrida’s Circumfession constantly in the background, this volume takes up the provocative readings of Augustine by Heidegger, Lyotard, Arendt, and Ricoeur. Derrida himself presides over and comments on essays by major Continental philosophers and internationally recognized Augustine scholars. While studies on and about Augustine as a philosopher abound, none approach his work from such a uniquely postmodern point of view, showing both (...)
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  12. John D. Caputo & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (2005). Augustine and Postmodernism: Confessions and Circumfession. Indiana University Press.
    At the heart of the current surge of interest in religion among contemporary Continental philosophers stands Augustine’s Confessions. With Derrida’s Circumfession constantly in the background, this volume takes up the provocative readings of Augustine by Heidegger, Lyotard, Arendt, and Ricoeur. Derrida himself presides over and comments on essays by major Continental philosophers and internationally recognized Augustine scholars. While studies on and about Augustine as a philosopher abound, none approach his work from such a uniquely postmodern point of view, showing both (...)
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  13.  2
    John D. Caputo & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (2007). Transcendence and Beyond: A Postmodern Inquiry. Indiana University Press.
    A benchmark volume at the intersection of philosophy and religion.
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  14. John D. Caputo & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (2007). Transcendence and Beyond: A Postmodern Inquiry. Indiana University Press.
    Transcendence and Beyond poses the classical questions of transcendence in a postmodern setting. Do we need a transcendence that is ever more beyond or should we put transcendence behind us altogether? Is it the case that, when seen in a postmodern light, transcendence must be itself transcended? In this thought-provoking volume, Jean-Luc Marion, Gianni Vattimo, and a distinguished group of international philosophers and theologians interrogate transcendence for today’s philosophy of religion. The essays gathered here examine notions of transcendence to assess (...)
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  15. John D. Caputo & Michael J. Scanlon (eds.) (2007). Transcendence and Beyond: A Postmodern Inquiry. Indiana University Press.
    Transcendence and Beyond poses the classical questions of transcendence in a postmodern setting. Do we need a transcendence that is ever more beyond or should we put transcendence behind us altogether? Is it the case that, when seen in a postmodern light, transcendence must be itself transcended? In this thought-provoking volume, Jean-Luc Marion, Gianni Vattimo, and a distinguished group of international philosophers and theologians interrogate transcendence for today’s philosophy of religion. The essays gathered here examine notions of transcendence to assess (...)
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