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Michael J. Zimmerman [81]Michael John Zimmerman [1]
  1.  21
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2014). Ignorance and Moral Obligation. OUP Oxford.
    Michael J. Zimmerman explores whether and how our ignorance about ourselves and our circumstances affects what our moral obligations and moral rights are. He rejects objective and subjective views of the nature of moral obligation, and presents a new case for a 'prospective' view.
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  2.  27
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2001). The Nature of Intrinsic Value. Rowman and Littlefield.
    At the heart of ethics reside the concepts of good and bad; they are at work when we assess whether a person is virtuous or vicious, an act right or wrong, a decision defensible or indefensible, a goal desirable or undesirable. But there are many varieties of goodness and badness. At their core lie intrinsic goodness and badness, the sort of value that something has for its own sake. It is in virtue of intrinsic value that other types of value (...)
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  3. Michael J. Zimmerman (1996). The Concept of Moral Obligation. Cambridge University Press.
    The principal aim of this book is to develop and defend an analysis of the concept of moral obligation. The analysis is neutral regarding competing substantive theories of obligation, whether consequentialist or deontological in character. What it seeks to do is generate new solutions to a range of philosophical problems concerning obligation and its application. Amongst these problems are deontic paradoxes, the supersession of obligation, conditional obligation, prima facie obligation, actualism and possibilism, (...)
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  4.  17
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2008). Living with Uncertainty: The Moral Significance of Ignorance. Cambridge University Press.
    Every choice we make is set against a background of massive ignorance about our past, our future, our circumstances, and ourselves. Philosophers are divided on the moral significance of such ignorance. Some say that it has a direct impact on how we ought to behave - the question of what our moral obligations are; others deny this, claiming that it only affects how we ought to be judged in light of the behaviour in which we choose to engage - the (...)
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  5.  28
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1988). An Essay on Moral Responsibility. Rowman & Littlefield.
    This superbly crafted account of the notion of moral responsibility and of its relations to freedom, control, ignorance, negligence, attempts, omissions, compulsion, mental disorders, virtues and vices, desert, and punishment fills that gap. The treatment of character and luck is particularly sophisticated and well-argued.
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  6. Michael J. Zimmerman (2011). The Immorality of Punishment. Broadview Press.
    It is hard to imagine a state functioning at all, let alone well, without having recourse to punishing those who break its laws. In The Immorality of Punishment, Michael Zimmerman argues not merely that our current practice of punishment is deplorable but that legal punishment itself is wrong, no matter its form. This astounding thesis is defended firstly by a sustained and compelling attack on the alternatives. Punishment is not justified by its role as a deterrent, because qua deterrent, we (...)
     
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  7. Michael J. Zimmerman (2002). Taking Luck Seriously. Journal of Philosophy 99 (11):553-576.
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  8. Michael J. Zimmerman (1997). Moral Responsibility and Ignorance. Ethics 107 (3):410-426.
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  9. Michael J. Zimmerman (2011). The Immorality of Punishment. Broadview Press.
    In _The Immorality of Punishment_ Michael Zimmerman argues forcefully that not only our current practice but indeed any practice of legal punishment is deeply morally repugnant, no matter how vile the behaviour that is its target. Despite the fact that it may be difficult to imagine a state functioning at all, let alone well, without having recourse to punishing those who break its laws, Zimmerman makes a timely and compelling case for the view that we must seek and put into (...)
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  10.  20
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2010). Moral Luck. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):585-608.
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  11. Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). Is Moral Obligation Objective or Subjective? Utilitas 18 (4):329-361.
    Many philosophers hold that whether an act is overall morally obligatory is an ‘objective’ matter, many that it is a ‘subjective’ matter, and some that it is both. The idea that it is or can be both may seem to promise a helpful answer to the question ‘What ought I to do when I do not know what I ought to do?’ In this article, three broad views are distinguished regarding what it is that obligation essentially concerns: the maximization of (...)
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  12. Michael J. Zimmerman (2007). The Good and the Right. Utilitas 19 (3):326-353.
    T. M. Scanlon has revived a venerable tradition according to which something's being good consists in its being such that there is a reason to respond positively towards it. He has presented novel arguments for this thesis. In this article, I first develop some refinements of the thesis with a view to focusing on intrinsic value in particular, then discuss the relation between the thesis and consequentialism, then critically examine Scanlon's arguments for the thesis, and finally turn to the question (...)
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  13. Michael J. Zimmerman (1987). Luck and Moral Responsibility. Ethics 97 (2):374-386.
    The following argument is addressed: (1) a person is morally responsible for an event's occurring only if that event's occurring was not a matter of luck; (2) no event is such that its occurring is not a matter of luck; therefore, (3) no event is such that someone is morally responsible for its occurring. Two notions of control are distinguished: restricted and complete. (2) is shown false on the first interpretation, (1) on the second. The discussion involves a distinction between (...)
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  14. Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). Moral Luck: A Partial Map. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):585-608.
  15. Kris McDaniel, Jason R. Raibley, Richard Feldman & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.) (2005). The Good, the Right, Life And Death: Essays in Honor of Fred Feldman. Ashgate.
  16.  39
    Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.) (2005). Recent Work on Intrinsic Value. Springer.
    Recent Work on Intrinsic Value brings together for the first time many of the most important and influential writings on the topic of intrinsic value to have appeared in the last half-century. During this period, inquiry into the nature of intrinsic value has intensified to such an extent that at the moment it is one of the hottest topics in the field of theoretical ethics. The contributions to this volume have been selected in such a way that all of the (...)
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  17. Michael J. Zimmerman (2009). Understanding What's Good for Us. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (4):429 - 439.
    The ancient question of what a good life consists in is currently the focus of intense debate. There are two aspects to this debate: the first concerns how the concept of a good life is to be understood; the second concerns what kinds of life fall within the extension of this concept. In this paper, I will attend only to the first, conceptual aspect and not to the second, substantive aspect. More precisely, I will address the preliminary, underlying question of (...)
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  18. Michael J. Zimmerman, Intrinsic Vs. Extrinsic Value. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Intrinsic value has traditionally been thought to lie at the heart of ethics. Philosophers use a number of terms to refer to such value. The intrinsic value of something is said to be the value that that thing has “in itself,” or “for its own sake,” or “as such,” or “in its own right.” Extrinsic value is value that is not intrinsic.
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  19.  27
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1997). A Plea for Accuses. American Philosophical Quarterly 34 (2):229 - 243.
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  20.  94
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2010). Responsibility, Reaction, and Value. Journal of Ethics 14 (2):103-115.
    Many writers accept the following thesis about responsibility: (R) For one to be responsible for something is for one to be such that it is fitting that one be the object of some reactive attitude with respect to that thing. This thesis bears a striking resemblance to a thesis about value that is also accepted by many writers: (V) For something to be good (or neutral, or bad) is for it to be such that it is fitting that it be (...)
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  21.  40
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1985). Sharing Responsibility. American Philosophical Quarterly 22 (2):115 - 122.
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  22. Michael J. Zimmerman (2011). The Immorality of Punishment. Broadview Press.
    In _The Immorality of Punishment_ Michael Zimmerman argues forcefully that not only our current practice but indeed any practice of legal punishment is deeply morally repugnant, no matter how vile the behaviour that is its target. Despite the fact that it may be difficult to imagine a state functioning at all, let alone well, without having recourse to punishing those who break its laws, Zimmerman makes a timely and compelling case for the view that we must seek and put into (...)
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  23. Michael J. Zimmerman (2007). Feldman on the Nature and Value of Pleasure. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 136 (3):425 - 437.
  24.  58
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2009). Responsibility and Awareness. Philosophical Books 50 (4):248-261.
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  25.  58
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1986). Negligence and Moral Responsibility. Noûs 20 (2):199-218.
  26.  24
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1987). Remote Obligation. American Philosophical Quarterly 24 (2):199 - 205.
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  27.  11
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2005). The Relevance of Risk to Wrongdoing. In Kris McDaniel, Jason R. Raibley, Richard Feldman & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.), The Good, the Right, Life And Death: Essays in Honor of Fred Feldman. Ashgate
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  28. Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). On the Fulfillment of Moral Obligation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (5):577-597.
    This paper considers three general views about the nature of moral obligation and three particular answers concerning the following question: if on Monday you lend me a book that I promise to return to you by Friday, what precisely is my obligation to you and what constitutes its fulfillment? The example is borrowed from W.D. Ross, who in The Right and the Good proposed what he called the Objective View of obligation, from which he inferred what is here called the (...)
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  29.  49
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1999). Virtual Intrinsic Value and the Principle of Organic Unities. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):653-666.
    This paper argues that Moore's principle of organic unities is false. Advocates of the principle have failed to take note of the distinction between actual intrinsic value and virtual intrinsic value. Purported cases of organic unities, where the actual intrinsic value of a part of a whole is allegedly defeated by the actual intrinsic value of the whole itself, are more plausibly seen as cases where the part in question has no actual intrinsic value but instead a plurality of merely (...)
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  30.  49
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1995). Actions and Events. Journal of Philosophical Research 20:585-594.
    Kent Bach has argued that certain traditional problems of action theory (conceming the individuation of actions, their timing, their location, and the manner in which they enter into causal relations) arise only on the supposition that actions are events, and he has argued further that actions are not events. In this paper these arguments are examined and rejected.
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  31.  36
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1990). Where Did I Go Wrong? Philosophical Studies 59 (1):55 - 77.
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  32.  17
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1981). Taking Some of the Mystery Out of Omissions. Southern Journal of Philosophy 19 (4):541-554.
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  33.  29
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2015). The Immorality of Punishment: A Reply to Levy. Criminal Law and Philosophy 9 (1):113-122.
    It is gratifying to me, though perhaps it will be disappointing to you, to discover that Neil Levy and I agree on much of what to say about the morality of punishment. His summary of the contents of The Immorality of Punishment is both generous and, for the most part, accurate, and the concerns that he raises are certainly reasonable. In what follows, I will address what I take to be the most significant of these concerns.IAs Levy notes, in the (...)
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  34.  22
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2014). Against Moral Responsibility, by Bruce N. Waller. Mind 123 (490):657-661.
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  35.  3
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). On the Fulfillment of Moral Obligation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (5):577-597.
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  36.  28
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1993). Supererogation and Doing the Best One Can. American Philosophical Quarterly 30 (4):373 - 380.
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  37.  17
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). Shifts in Moral Obligation. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 14 (1):62-79.
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  38.  27
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1986). Subsidiary Obligation. Philosophical Studies 50 (1):65 - 75.
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  39.  30
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1985). Intervening Agents and Moral Responsibility. Philosophical Quarterly 35 (141):347-358.
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  40.  23
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1993). Obligation, Responsibility and Alternate Possibilities. Analysis 53 (1):51 - 53.
    It has recently been argued that the principle that "ought" implies "can" entails the principle that moral responsibility requires alternate possibilities, and hence that the acceptance of the former principle requires acceptance of the latter. This paper disputes the alleged entailment and gives reasons for accepting the former principle while rejecting the latter.
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  41.  3
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1984). An Essay on Human Action. P. Lang.
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  42.  50
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2004). Another Plea for Excuses. American Philosophical Quarterly 41 (3):259 - 266.
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  43.  34
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1980). On the Intrinsic Value of States of Pleasure. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 41 (1/2):26-45.
  44.  26
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1994). Rights, Compensation, and Culpability. Law and Philosophy 13 (4):419 - 450.
  45.  19
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1990). The Range of Options. American Philosophical Quarterly 27 (4):345 - 355.
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  46.  24
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1999). Virtual Intrinsic Value and the Principle of Organic Unities. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):653 - 666.
    This paper argues that Moore's principle of organic unities is false. Advocates of the principle have failed to take note of the distinction between actual intrinsic value and virtual intrinsic value. Purported cases of organic unities, where the actual intrinsic value of a part of a whole is allegedly defeated by the actual intrinsic value of the whole itself, are more plausibly seen as cases where the part in question has no actual intrinsic value but instead a plurality of merely (...)
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  47.  11
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1982). Moral Responsibility, Freedom and Alternate Possibilities. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 63 (3):243.
    Frankfurt has attacked the principle that a person is morally responsible for what he has done only if he could have done otherwise, And he has thereby sought to undermine the traditional debate between compatibilists and incompatibilists. The role that the principle plays in this debate is clarified. Frankfurt's type of argument is then assessed for its implications concerning both the principle and the debate. It is argued that the debate, Even if not the principle, May well emerge intact.
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  48.  2
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2010). Responsibility, Reaction, and Value. Journal of Ethics 14 (2):103-115.
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  49.  37
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2010). Review of Fred Feldman, What is This Thing Called Happiness?. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).
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  50.  15
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1983). Evaluatively Incomplete States of Affairs. Philosophical Studies 43 (2):211 - 224.
    The main point of this paper has been to show that the concept of evaluative incompleteness deserves consideration. In addition, I have suggested that it is plausible to accept that certain states of affairs in fact are evaluatively incomplete. But I have not sought to prove that this is so; indeed, I do not know how such proof might be given. Just which states of affairs, if any, are evaluatively incomplete is an extremely vexed question, and it is not one (...)
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