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  1. Michael K. Green (1994). Cultural Themes in European Philosophy, Law and Economics. History of European Ideas 19 (4-6):805-810.
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  2. Michael K. Green (1994). Images of Justice. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 7 (3):241-251.
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  3. Michael K. Green (1993). Images of Native Americans in Advertising: Some Moral Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (4):323 - 330.
    Images of Native Americans and of aspects of Native American culture are common in advertisements in the United States. Three such images can be distinguished — the Noble Savage, the Civilizable Savage and the Bloodthirsty Savage images. The aim of this paper is to argue that the use of such images is not morally acceptable because these images depend upon an underlying conception of Native Americans that denies that they are human beings. By so doing, it also denies to them (...)
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  4. Michael K. Green (1992). Fairness in Hierarchical and Entrepreneurial Firms. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (11):877-882.
    Discussions of fairness in the workplace are built on assumptions about the organization of work and about fairness. Writers on business ethics have not appreciated that work is often organized differently in different stages of the life cycle of a firm. In this paper it is argued that the conceptions of fairness applied to a mature firm are often not applicable to a fledgling one. In a mature firm authority and responsibility are typically delegated and divided into specific jobs with (...)
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  5. Michael K. Green (1992). Kant and Moral Self-Deception. Kant-Studien 83 (2):149-169.
    An agent is one who regulates his/her own actions through positive and negative feedback. It is painful for a rational being to set himself a task and then find himself unable to complete it entirely as he/she conceives it. To escape this pain, a person may use self-deception to avoid such negative feedback. When this denial becomes universalized, an agent can no longer function as a self-regulating, cybernetic system, i.e., as an agent who directs his/her own actions. Ten types of (...)
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  6. Michael K. Green (1988). Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 7 (5):336-336.
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  7. Michael K. Green (1986). A Kantian Evaluation of Taylorism in the Workplace. Journal of Business Ethics 5 (2):165 - 169.
    A Kantian evaluation of Taylorism in the workplace requires a consideration of four problems; (1) the conditions of agency, (2) the relation of Taylorism to these conditions, (3) an explanation of the method given by the Typic for applying the Categorical Imperative, and (4) the actual application of the Categorical Imperative to Taylorism. An agent who views himself as a performer is distinguished from an agent who is a mere observer of his own actions, and it is argued that Taylorism (...)
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  8. Michael K. Green (1983). Kant, Crimes Against Nature, and Contraception. New Scholasticism 57 (4):501-516.