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Michael Keeley [8]Michael C. Keeley [2]
  1. Michael Keeley (forthcoming). The Trouble with Transformational Leadership: Toward a Federalist Ethic for Organizations. Business Ethics Quarterly.
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  2. Michael Keeley (2000). A “Matter of Opinion, What Tends to the General Welfare”. Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (1):243-254.
    Opinion surveys and popular media suggest that American workers are disillusioned with their employers and bosses. Governance in organizations is becoming a recognized problem. Classical works on governance call for more virtuous leaders, less selfish followers, and closer attention to the common good. These works were rejected as a basis for governing nations in the 18th century. They are unlikely to provide a basis for governing organizations in the 21st century. This article outlines a liberal-democratic approach to governing corporations, applies (...)
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  3. Michael Keeley (1996). Community, The Joyful Sound. Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (4):549-560.
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  4. Michael Keeley (1995). Continuing the Social Contract Tradition. Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (2):241-255.
    Social contract theory has a rich history. It originated among the ancients with recognition that social arrangements were not products of nature but convention. It developed through the centuries as theorists sought ethical criteria for distinguishing good conventions from bad. The search for such ethical criteria continues in recent attempts to apply social contract theory to organizations. In this paper, I question the concept ofconsent as a viable ethical criterion, and I argue for an alternate principle of impartiality as a (...)
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  5. Michael Keeley (1995). The Trouble With Transformational Leadership. Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (1):67-96.
    Popular media, communitarian writings, and recent management literature suggest that communities and organizations are rent by factional mischief: by individuals and groups who pursue their own selfish interests without regard for the common good. An emerging solution to this problem is “transformational” leadership, which seeks to refocus individuals’ attention on highervisions and collective goals. The dangers of such a solution were identified by James Madison at the Constitutional Convention of 1787; and mechanisms to thwart it were designed into the framers’ (...)
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  6. Michael Keeley & Jill W. Graham (1991). Exit, Voice, and Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (5):349 - 355.
    Hirschman's (1970) exit, voice, and loyalty framework draws attention to both economic and political behavior as instruments for organizational change. The framework is simple but powerful; it has stimulated much cross-disciplinary analysis and debate. This paper extends this analysis by examining normative implications of Hirschman's basic premise: that exit and voice are primarily mechanisms for enhancing organizational (vs. individual) well-being.
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  7. Michael C. Keeley (1990). [Book Review] a Social-Contract Theory of Organizations. [REVIEW] Ethics 100:681-682.
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  8. Michael Keeley (1987). Freedom in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 6 (4):249 - 263.
    Organizations in competitive markets are often assumed to be voluntary associations, involving free exchange between various participants for mutual benefit. Just how voluntary or free organizational exchanges really are, however, is problematic. Even the criteria for determining whether specific transactions are free or coerced are not clear. In this paper, I review three general approaches to specifying such criteria: consequentialist, descriptive, and normative. I argue that the last is the most reasonable, that freedom is an essentially moral concept, whose meaning (...)
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  9. Michael Keeley (1981). Organizations as Non-Persons. Journal of Value Inquiry 15 (2):149-155.
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  10. Michael C. Keeley (1981). The Microeconomics of Nonhuman Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):396.
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