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  1. Michael L. Barnett & Sunyoung Lee (2011). What Were They Thinking? Exploring the Cognitive Underpinnings of How Stakeholders Assess Firms. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:459-468.
    Aggregated reputation scores and rankings have been rightly criticized for lacking a theoretical basis by which to weight the individual perceptions that form them. The resulting product can be a score or ranking that fails to represent the perceptions of many or even most stakeholders. Little attention has been paid, however, to the reverse. Rather than focus on how individual perceptions can be represented at an aggregate level, herein we focus on how an aggregated reputation can influence individual perceptions. We (...)
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  2. Michael L. Barnett & Gloria Cahill (2007). Measure Less, Succeed More. Philosophy of Management 6 (1):147-162.
    Over the last decade, managers have increasingly emphasised the creation of tangible measures of intangible organisational properties. Many major corporations now include measures for intellectual capital, knowledge capital, reputational capital, and other such intangible assets on their financial ledgers. Counter to the rubric that ‘If it doesn’t get measured, it doesn’t get done,’ we argue that some intangibles are truly intangible, and attempts to apply tangible measures to them creates undue organisational stress and harms the underlying asset. Instead, managers may (...)
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  3. Michael L. Barnett (2006). Using CSR to CYA. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:55-57.
    In this paper, I seek to build a theoretical framework that explains how effectively different firms can use different types of corporate social responsibility (CSR)to influence stakeholders perceptions of and reactions to different types of errors. CSR affects the errors stakeholders notice, how they frame them, how they respond to them, and how quickly any punishment wanes. Ex ante and ex post CSR decrease the likelihood that stakeholders will notice some errors, improve the framing of those errors that are noticed, (...)
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  4. Michael L. Barnett & Gloria Cahill (2006). Measure Less, Succeed More: A Zen Approach to Organizational Effectiveness. Philosophy of Management 6.
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  5. Michael L. Barnett & Bryant A. Hudson (2006). Big & Bad? A Sociological Perspective on the Icarus Paradox. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:239-241.
    One of the more interesting counter-intuitive findings in organizational research is that success breeds failure. This counter-intuitive has been described in termsof core rigidities, core incompetencies, and even the Icarus Paradox. The literature on these topics has concluded that success yields overconfidence and myopia in firms and their managers, and this eventually causes failure. We augment this literature by suggesting that success breeds not only internal pathologies that cause firms to misuse their established resources over time, but also external pathologies (...)
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  6. Michael L. Barnett (2005). Stakeholder Influence Capacity and the Variability of Financial Returns to Corporate Social Responsibility. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:287-292.
    This paper argues that research on the business case for corporate social responsibility (CSR) must account for the path dependent nature of firm-stakeholderrelations, and develops the construct of stakeholder influence capacity (SIC) to fill this void. SIC helps to explain why the effects of CSR on corporate financial performance (CFP) vary across firms and across time, therein providing a missing link in the study of the business case. This paper distinguishes CSR from related and confounded corporate resource allocations and from (...)
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  7. Charles J. Fombrun, Naomi A. Gardberg & Michael L. Barnett (2000). Opportunity Platforms and Safety Nets: Corporate Citizenship and Reputational Risk. Business and Society Review 105 (1):85-106.
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