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  1. Michael L. Frazer (2013). Including the Unaffected. Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (3).
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  2. Thomas Bénatouïl, Emanuele Maffi, Franco Trabattoni, Kurt Flasch, Michael L. Frazer, Paul R. Goldin, Ancient Philosophies & Berkeley-Los Angeles (2011). Ademollo, Francesco. The Cratylus of Plato: A Commentary. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Pp. Xx+ 538. Cloth, $140.00. Baxter, Hugh. Habermas: The Discourse of Law and Philosophy. Justice: Profiles in Legal Theory. Stanford: Stanford Law Books, 2011. Pp. Ix+ 335. Cloth, $60.00. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (4):511-513.
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  3. Michael L. Frazer (2011). Smith Contra Slote. Analytic Philosophy 52 (4):319-327.
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  4. Michael L. Frazer (2010). European Journal of Political. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (2):218-226.
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  5. Michael L. Frazer (2010). Review Article: The Modest Professor Interpretive Charity and Interpretive Humility in John Rawls's Lectures on the History of Political Philosophy. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (2):218-226.
  6. Michael L. Frazer (2010). The Enlightenment of Sympathy: Justice and the Moral Sentiments in the Eighteenth Century and Today. Oxford University Press.
  7. Michael L. Frazer (2009). Review of J. G. A. Pocock, Political Thought and History: Essays on Theory and Method. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (11).
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  8. Michael L. Frazer (2007). John Rawls: Between Two Enlightenments. Political Theory 35 (6):756 - 780.
    John Rawls shares the Enlightenment's commitment to finding moral and political principles which can be reflectively endorsed by all individuals autonomously. He usually presents reflective autonomy in Kantian, rationalist terms: autonomy is identified with the exercise of reason, and principles of justice must be constructed which are acceptable to all on the basis of reason alone. Yet David Hume, Adam Smith and many other Enlightenment thinkers rejected such rationalism, searching instead for principles which can be endorsed by all on the (...)
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  9. Michael L. Frazer (2006). Esotericism Ancient and Modern: Strauss Contra Straussianism on the Art of Political-Philosophical Writing. Political Theory 34 (1):33 - 61.
    Leo Strauss presents at least two distinct accounts of the idea that the authors in the political-philosophical canon have often masked their true teachings. A weaker account of esotericism, dependent on the contingent fact of presecution, is attributed to the moderns, while a stronger account, stemming from a necessary conflict between philosophy and society, is attributed to the ancients. Although most interpreters agree that Strauss here sides with the ancients, this view fails to consider the possibility that Strauss's writings on (...)
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