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Michael T. McFall [6]Michael McFall [3]
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Profile: Michael McFall (Stanford University)
  1. Michael T. McFall (2013). Book Review: Laura M. Hartman, The Christian Consumer: Living Faithfully in a Fragile World. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (2):240-243.
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  2. Paul K. Moser & Michael T. McFall (eds.) (2013). The Wisdom of the Christian Faith. Cambridge University Press.
    An anthology of accessible essays by prominent Christian philosophers on topics of religious and philosophical interest.
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  3. Michael McFall (2012). Norvin Richards, The Ethics of Parenthood. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):135-136.
    Norvin Richards, The Ethics of Parenthood Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s10677-011-9298-3 Authors Michael McFall, Department of Philosophy, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403, USA Journal Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Online ISSN 1572-8447 Print ISSN 1386-2820.
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  4. Michael T. McFall (2012). Can Christians Be Philosophy Professors? Teaching Philosophy 35 (1):63-81.
    In The Elusive God: Reorienting Religious Epistemology, Paul Moser argues that Jesus’s love commands have important implications for how philosophy should be done by Christian philosophers. He calls for a reorientation of the questions that philosophers pursue, requiring that questions lead to agape-oriented ministry. Yet Moser omits discussion of an important duty of philosophers—teaching. Once the duty of teaching is considered, this essay argues that few philosophers could meet Moser’s ideal. Instead of abandoning Moser’s project to reorient philosophy, though, this (...)
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  5. Michael T. McFall (2012). Christine Overall, Why Have Children? The Ethical Debate. Journal of Value Inquiry 46 (2):275-278.
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  6. Michael T. McFall (2012). Real Character-Friends: Aristotelian Friendship, Living Together, and Technology. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 14 (3):221-230.
    Aristotle’s account of friendship has largely withstood the test of time. Yet there are overlooked elements of his account that, when challenged by apparent threats of current and emerging communication technologies, reveal his account to be remarkably prescient. I evaluate the danger that technological advances in communication pose to the future of friendship by examining and defending Aristotle’s claim that perfect or character-friends must live together. I concede that technologically-mediated communication can aid existing character-friendships, but I argue that character-friendships cannot (...)
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  7. Michael T. McFall (2012). Wise Stewards: Philosophical Foundations of Christian Parenting, by Michael W. Austin. Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):368-372.
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  8. Michael McFall (2011). Living Dogma and Marriage. Philosophia 39 (4):657-672.
    The decision to get married, as well as choosing whom to marry, is of the utmost importance to most people. This decision consists of many amoral considerations, but an ethical relationship arises when a promise is made, especially a vow that binds for a lifetime and affects oneself, one’s spouse, one’s children, and society. This essay provides an account of ideal romantic marriage, arguing that John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty provides an excellent foundation for constructing such an account. Neither dead (...)
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  9. Michael McFall (2009). Licensing Parents: Family, State, and Child Maltreatment. Rowman and Littlefield.
    In Licensing Parents, Michael McFall argues that political structures, economics, education, racism, and sexism are secondary in importance to the inequality caused by families, and that the family plays the primary role in a child's acquisition of a sense of justice. He demonstrates that examination of the family is necessary in political philosophy and that informal structures (families) and considerations (character formation) must be taken seriously. McFall advocates a threshold that should be accepted by all political philosophers: children should not (...)
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