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Michael Naas [52]Michael Bruce Naas [1]
  1. Jacques Derrida, Pascale-Anne Brault & Michael Naas (1994). "To Do Justice to Freud": The History of Madness in the Age of Psychoanalysis. Critical Inquiry 20 (2):227-266.
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  2.  10
    Michael Naas (2012). Miracle and Machine: Jacques Derrida and the Two Sources of Religion, Science, and the Media. Fordham University Press.
    Miracle and Machine is a sort of "reader's guide" to Jacques Derrida's 1994 essay "faith and knowledge," his most important work on the nature of religion in general and on the unprecedented forms it is taking today through science and the ...
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  3.  2
    Michael Naas (2008). Derrida From Now On. Fordham University Press.
    Taking as its point of departure several of Derrida's later works (from "Faith and Knowledge" and The Work of Mourning to Rogues and Learning to Live Finally), ...
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  4.  16
    Michael Naas (2002). Taking on the Tradition: Jacques Derrida and the Legacies of Deconstruction. Stanford University Press.
    Taking on the Tradition focuses on how the work of Jacques Derrida has helped us rethink and rework the themes of tradition, legacy, and inheritance in the Western philosophical tradition. It concentrates not only on such themes in the work of Derrida but also on his own gestures with regard to these themes—that is, on the performativity of Derrida’s texts. The book thus uses Derrida’s understanding of speech act theory to reread his own work. The book consists in a series (...)
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  5. Michael Naas (2009). Miracle and Machine: The Two Sources of Religion and Science in Derrida's "Faith and Knowledge". Research in Phenomenology 39 (2):184-203.
    This essay attempts to lay out the three principal theses of Jacques Derrida’s 1994-1995 “Faith and Knowledge,‘ Derrida’s most sustained but also most challenging work on the nature of religion and the relationship between religion and science. After demonstrating through these three theses that religion and science not only share a common source-or have a common genesis-but are in what Derrida calls an autoimmune relationship to one another, the essay puts these theses to the test by reading a brief passage (...)
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  6.  61
    Michael Naas (2010). Derridas Flair (For the Animals to Follow...). Research in Phenomenology 40 (2):219-242.
    This essay traces the history of Jacques Derrida's engagement with the question of the animal and the methodology Derrida follows in his 2008 The Animal That Therefore I Am . As Derrida demonstrates, the history of philosophy is marked from its inception by an attempt to draw a single, indivisible line between humans and all other animals by attributing some capacity to humans (e.g., language, culture, mourning, a relationship to death) and denying it to animals. Derrida thus begins by questioning (...)
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  7. Jacques Derrida, Pascale-Anne Brault & Michael Naas (2003). Chaque Fois Unique, la Fin du Monde.
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  8.  5
    Michael Naas (2016). Socrates in a Birmingham Jail. Philosophical Inquiry 40 (3):90-101.
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  9. Michael Naas (2006). "One Nation … Indivisible": Jacques Derrida on the Autoimmunity of Democracy and the Sovereignty of God. Research in Phenomenology 36 (1):15-44.
    During the final decade of his life, Jacques Derrida came to use the trope of autoimmunity with greater and greater frequency. Indeed it today appears that autoimmunity was to have been the last iteration of what for more than forty years Derrida called deconstruction. This essay looks at the consequences of this terminological shift for our understanding not only of Derrida's final works (such as Rogues) but of his entire corpus. By taking up a term from the biological sciences that (...)
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  10.  15
    Michael Naas (2005). "Alors, Qui Etes-Vous?" Jacques Derrida and the Question of Hospitality. Substance 34 (1):6-17.
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  11.  7
    Michael Naas (2015). Violence and Historicity: Derrida’s Early Readings of Heidegger. Research in Phenomenology 45 (2):191-213.
    _ Source: _Volume 45, Issue 2, pp 191 - 213 With the recent publication of Jacques Derrida’s seminar of 1964–65, Heidegger: The Question of Being and History, it has become abundantly clear that when the full history of Derrida’s half-century-long engagement with Heidegger is finally written a special place will have to be reserved for the question of history itself, and especially the question of history or historicity in its irreducible relationship to language and to violence. In this essay, I (...)
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  12.  1
    Michael Naas (2016). Plato and the Spectacle of Laughter. Angelaki 21 (3):13-26.
    This essay examines the critical role played by comedy and laughter in Plato. It begins by taking seriously Plato's critique of comedy and his concerns about the negative effects of laughter in dialogues such as Republic and Laws. It then shows how Plato, rather than simply rejecting comedy and censuring laughter, attempts to put these into the service of philosophy by rethinking them in philosophical terms. Accordingly, the laughable or the ridiculous is understood not just in relation to the ugly (...)
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  13.  3
    Michael Naas (2010). Derrida's Flair. Research in Phenomenology 40 (2):219-242.
    This essay traces the history of Jacques Derrida's engagement with the question of the animal and the methodology Derrida follows in his 2008 The Animal That Therefore I Am . As Derrida demonstrates, the history of philosophy is marked from its inception by an attempt to draw a single, indivisible line between humans and all other animals by attributing some capacity to humans and denying it to animals. Derrida thus begins by questioning the supposed fact that animals do not have (...)
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  14.  5
    Michael Naas (2015). Echoing Sentiments: Art and Melancholy in the Work of Pleshette DeArmitt. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (2):76-83.
    During those first few days, those first few weeks, truth be told, still today, something in me has wanted simply to echo the sentiments of others. That’s because I myself didn’t know exactly what to say and, truth be told, I still don’t know today. But it’s also because others, including and especially some of the people here today, beginning with my co-panelists and, perhaps especially, early on, Leigh Johnson, knew at the time just what had to be said and (...)
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  15.  39
    Michael Naas (2012). The Philosophy and Literature of the Death Penalty: Two Sides of the Same Sovereign. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (s1):39-55.
    This essay demonstrates that in his 1999–2000 Death Penalty Seminar Jacques Derrida pursues the deconstruction of political theology that he had been pursuing in a more or less explicit fashion for more than two decades. Derrida's interest in the theme of the death penalty can be traced back in large part, it is argued, to the theological and essentially Judeo-Christian origins that Derrida finds in discourses both for and against the death penalty. This emphasis on the theological origins of the (...)
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  16.  8
    Michael Naas (2005). A Last Call for 'Europe'. Theory and Event 8 (1).
  17. Michael Naas (2010). Derrida's Reinvention of Philosophical Writing in 'Plato's Pharmacy'. In Miriam Leonard (ed.), Derrida and Antiquity. Oxford University Press 43.
     
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  18.  3
    Michael Naas (1997). Derrida's Watch, Foucault's Pendulum. Philosophy Today 41 (1):141-152.
  19.  2
    Jacques Derrida, Pascale-Anne Brault & Michael Naas (1996). By Force of Mourning. Critical Inquiry 22 (2):171-192.
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  20.  13
    Michael Naas (1999). Practically Not To Be. Studies in Practical Philosophy 1 (1):68-85.
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  21.  3
    Michael Naas (2014). Une survivance bien entamée. Rue Descartes 82 (3):113.
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  22.  9
    Michael Naas (2003). For the Name's Sake. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):199-221.
    In Plato’s later dialogues, and particularly in the Sophist, there is a general reinterpretation and rehabilitation of the name (onoma) in philosophy. No longer understood rather vaguely as one of potentially dangerous and deceptive elements of everyday language or of poetic language, the word onoma is recast in the Sophist and related dialogues into one of the essential elements of a philosophical language that aims to make claims or propositions about the way thingsare. Onoma, now understood as name, is thus (...)
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  23.  13
    Michael Naas (1995). Philosophy Bound: The Fate of the Promethean Socrates. Research in Phenomenology 25 (1):121-141.
  24.  11
    Michael Naas (2013). The Promise of Other Voices: Response to Sarah Hammerschlag, Martin Hägglund, Penelope Deutscher, and Rodolphe Gasché. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):118-137.
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  25. Michael Naas (1995). Turning: From Persuasion to Philosophy: A Reading of Homer's Iliad. Humanities Press.
     
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  26.  8
    Edward S. Casey, Donald A. Landes, Eduardo Mendieta, Michael Naas & Leonard Lawlor (2013). Hugh J. Silverman. Chiasmi International 15:455-457.
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  27.  4
    Michael Naas (2014). “World, Solitude, Finitude”: Derrida’s Final Seminar. Research in Phenomenology 44 (1):1-27.
    In his final seminar, The Beast and the Sovereign, vol. 2 , Jacques Derrida spends the entire year reading just two texts, Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and Martin Heidegger’s Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics. This essay looks in detail at Derrida’s treatment of this latter and, in particular, at Derrida’s emphasis on the Heideggerian notion of Walten in this work. The essay begins by considering several of Derrida’s prior engagements with Heidegger, especially in Of Spirit and the “Geschlecht” essays, and their (...)
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  28.  21
    Michael Naas (2004). Lifting the Veil of Race and the Problem of the 21st Century. Philosophia Africana 7 (1):41-56.
  29.  6
    Michael Naas (2006). Lifelines. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):221-236.
    “Prière à desceller d’une ligne de vie”: This is Jacques Derrida’s shortest published work—a one-line poem published back in 1986. In this essay I attempt to read this one-line poem through several texts of Derrida from the same period, including “Shibboleth” and “How to Avoid Speaking: Denials.” The essay is an attempt to bear witness to the extraordinary life and work of Derrida through a reading of this single line about life and work, living speech and the dead letter, life (...)
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  30.  8
    Michael Naas (2005). The World Over. Radical Philosophy Review 8 (2):123-130.
    Written in the days immediately following the death of Jacques Derrida on 9 October 2004, this essay attempts to bear witness tothe memory of Jacques Derrida as a writer and thinker and, even more personally, a mentor and friend. Written out of gratitude and affection, but also out of an almost overwhelming emotion, the essay is offered here, not without trepidation, in the hope that, in some small measure, the author’s emotion, affection, and genuine gratitude for the life and work (...)
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  31.  1
    Edward S. Casey, Donald Landes, Eduardo Mendieta, Michael Naas & Leonard Lawlor (2013). Hugh J. Silverman. Chiasmi International 15:451-453.
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  32.  1
    Michael Naas (1991). The Tragedy of Renown. Philosophy Today 35 (3):277-290.
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  33.  1
    Michael Naas (2007). HC for Life, That Is to Say....(Review). Symploke 15 (1):368-370.
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  34. Jeremy Bell & Michael Naas (eds.) (2015). Plato’s Animals: Gadflies, Horses, Swans, and Other Philosophical Beasts. Indiana University Press.
    Plato's Animals examines the crucial role played by animal images, metaphors, allusions, and analogies in Plato's Dialogues. These fourteen lively essays demonstrate that the gadflies, snakes, stingrays, swans, dogs, horses, and other animals that populate Plato's work are not just rhetorical embellishments. Animals are central to Plato's understanding of the hierarchy between animals, humans, and gods and are crucial to his ideas about education, sexuality, politics, aesthetics, the afterlife, the nature of the soul, and philosophy itself. The volume includes a (...)
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  35. Jeremy Bell & Michael Naas (eds.) (2015). Plato’s Animals: Gadflies, Horses, Swans, and Other Philosophical Beasts. Indiana University Press.
    Plato's Animals examines the crucial role played by animal images, metaphors, allusions, and analogies in Plato's Dialogues. These fourteen lively essays demonstrate that the gadflies, snakes, stingrays, swans, dogs, horses, and other animals that populate Plato's work are not just rhetorical embellishments. Animals are central to Plato's understanding of the hierarchy between animals, humans, and gods and are crucial to his ideas about education, sexuality, politics, aesthetics, the afterlife, the nature of the soul, and philosophy itself. The volume includes a (...)
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  36. Jeremy Bell & Michael Naas (eds.) (2015). Plato’s Animals: Gadflies, Horses, Swans, and Other Philosophical Beasts. Indiana University Press.
    Plato's Animals examines the crucial role played by animal images, metaphors, allusions, and analogies in Plato's Dialogues. These fourteen lively essays demonstrate that the gadflies, snakes, stingrays, swans, dogs, horses, and other animals that populate Plato's work are not just rhetorical embellishments. Animals are central to Plato's understanding of the hierarchy between animals, humans, and gods and are crucial to his ideas about education, sexuality, politics, aesthetics, the afterlife, the nature of the soul, and philosophy itself. The volume includes a (...)
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  37. Pascale-Anne Brault & Michael Naas (eds.) (1999). Adieu to Emmanuel Levinas. Stanford University Press.
    This volume contains the speech given by Derrida at Emmanuel Levinas's funeral on December 27, 1995, and his contribution to a colloquium organized to mark the first anniversary of Levinas's death. For both thinkers, the word _adieu_ names a fundamental characteristic of human being: the salutation or benediction prior to all constative language and that given at the moment of separation, sometimes forever, as at the moment of death, it is also the _a-dieu_, for God or to God before and (...)
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  38. Pascale-Anne Brault & Michael Naas (eds.) (1993). Memoirs of the Blind: The Self-Portrait and Other Ruins. University of Chicago Press.
    In this brilliant essay, Jacques Derrida explores issues of vision, blindness, self-representation, and their relation to drawing, while offering detailed readings of an extraordinary collection of images. Selected by Derrida from the prints and drawings department of the Louvre, the works depict blindness—fictional, historical, and biblical. From Old and New Testament scenes to the myth of Perseus and the Gorgon and the blinding of Polyphemus, Derrida uncovers in these images rich, provocative layers of interpretation. For Derrida drawing is itself blind; (...)
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  39. Pascale-Anne Brault & Michael Naas (eds.) (2005). Rogues: Two Essays on Reason. Stanford University Press.
    _Rogues_, published in France under the title _Voyous_, comprises two major lectures that Derrida delivered in 2002 investigating the foundations of the sovereignty of the nation-state. The term "_État voyou_" is the French equivalent of "rogue state," and it is this outlaw designation of certain countries by the leading global powers that Derrida rigorously and exhaustively examines. Derrida examines the history of the concept of sovereignty, engaging with the work of Bodin, Hobbes, Rousseau, Schmitt, and others. Against this background, he (...)
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  40. Pascale-Anne Brault & Michael Naas (eds.) (2001). The Work of Mourning. University of Chicago Press.
    Jacques Derrida is, in the words of the_ New York Times_, "perhaps the world's most famous philosopher—if not the only famous philosopher." He often provokes controversy as soon as his name is mentioned. But he also inspires the respect that comes from an illustrious career, and, among many who were his colleagues and peers, he inspired friendship. _The Work of Mourning_ is a collection that honors those friendships in the wake of passing. Gathered here are texts—letters of condolence, memorial essays, (...)
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  41. Pascale-Anne Brault & Michael Naas (eds.) (2003). The Work of Mourning. University of Chicago Press.
    Jacques Derrida is, in the words of the_ New York Times_, "perhaps the world's most famous philosopher—if not the only famous philosopher." He often provokes controversy as soon as his name is mentioned. But he also inspires the respect that comes from an illustrious career, and, among many who were his colleagues and peers, he inspired friendship. _The Work of Mourning_ is a collection that honors those friendships in the wake of passing. Gathered here are texts—letters of condolence, memorial essays, (...)
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  42. Jacques Derrida, Pascale-Anne Brault & Michael Naas (1996). Adieu. Critical Inquiry 23 (1):1-10.
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  43. Jacques Derrida, Pascale-Anne Brault & Michael Naas (2004). The work of mourning, Chaquefois unique, la fin du monde, coll. « La philosophie en effet ». Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 194 (3):379-380.
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  44. Nouri Gana, Jacques Derrida, Pascale-Anne Brault & Michael Naas (2003). The Work of Mourning. Substance 32 (1):150.
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  45. Peggy Kamuf, Pascale-Anne Brault & Michael Naas (eds.) (1998). Resistances of Psychoanalysis. Stanford University Press.
    In the three essays that make up this stimulating and often startling book, Jacques Derrida argues against the notion that the basic ideas of psychoanalysis have been thoroughly worked through, argued, and assimilated. The continuing interest in psychoanalysis is here examined in the various "resistances" to analysis—conceived not only as a phenomenon theorized at the heart of psychoanalysis, but as psychoanalysis's resistance to itself, an insusceptibility to analysis that has to do with the structure of analysis itself. Derrida not only (...)
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  46. Michael Naas (2008). Derrida's America. In Robert Eaglestone & Simon Glendinning (eds.), Derrida's Legacies: Literature and Philosophy. Routledge
  47. Michael Naas (2001). In and Out of Touch: Derrida's Le Toucher, Jean-Luc Nancy (Editions Galilée, 2000). Research in Phenomenology 31:258-265.
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  48. Michael Naas (2001). In and Out of Touch: Derrida's Le Toucher. Review of Le Toucher, Jean-Luc Nancy by Jacques Derrida. Research in Phenomenology 31:258-265.
     
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  49. Michael Naas (2013). If You Could Take Just Two Books ...": Jacques Derrida at the Ends of the World with Heidegger and Robinson Crusoe. In Amy Swiffen & Joshua Nichols (eds.), The Ends of History: Questioning the Stakes of Historical Reason. Routledge
  50. Michael Naas (2002). Lyotard, Nancy, and the Myth of Interruption. In Hugh J. Silverman (ed.), Lyotard: Philosophy, Politics, and the Sublime. Routledge 8--100.
     
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