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  1. Michael Newall (2014). Painting and Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 9 (4):225-237.
    This article is primarily concerned with the philosophical problems that arise out of a consideration of painting. By painting I mean of course not any kind of application of paint to a surface – house painting for instance – but painting as an art, to use Richard Wollheim's phrase. Since Plato, philosophy has intermittently been concerned with these problems, and over the past 30 years, painting has come under a new focus as philosophy of art has increasingly turned its attention (...)
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  2. Michael Newall (2011). What is a Picture?: Depiction, Realism, Abstraction. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- List of figures -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Convention -- Seeing and the Experience of Pictures -- A Theory of Depiction -- Resemblance -- Transparency and Resemblance -- Realism -- Varieties of Realism -- Abstraction -- Notes -- Index.
     
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  3. Michael Newall (2010). Pictorial Resemblance. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):91-103.
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  4. Michael Newall (2009). Pictorial Experience and Seeing. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (2):129-141.
    This paper proposes that pictorial experience, the experience that pictures give rise to when we understand them, involves the non-veridical experience of seeing the picture's subject matter. Using phenomenological analysis and material from philosophy of mind and perceptual psychology, it argues that both pictorial experience lacking awareness of the picture surface, such as illusion, and pictorial experience that includes this awareness, i.e. seeing-in, should be understood in this way.
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  5. Michael Newall (2006). Pictures, Colour and Resemblance. Philosophical Quarterly 56 (225):587–595.
    Resemblances between colour pictures and their subject-matter can be identified. I use insights from perceptual psychology to develop a description of these shared colour properties. While resemblances do exist, they do not support resemblance theories of depiction. Instead, the character of these resemblances is determined by the construction of our visual system, and is not necessary for depiction. These results support a theory of depiction which holds that our abilities of visual recognition are crucial to our ability to understand pictures.
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  6. Michael Newall (2005). Picturing Pictures: Reply to Dilworth. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):70–73.
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  7. Michael Newall (2003). A Restriction for Pictures and Some Consequences for a Theory of Depiction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (4):381–394.
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