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Profile: Michael Padraic Wolf (Washington and Jefferson College)
  1. Michael P. Wolf (2012). Boundaries, Reasons, and Relativism. Journal of Philosophical Research 37:205-220.
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  2. Michael P. Wolf, Rigid Designation and Natural Kind Terms, Pittsburgh Style. Normative Functionalism and the Pittsburgh School.
    This paper addresses recent literature on rigid designation and natural kind terms that draws on the inferentialist approaches of Sellars and Brandom, among others. Much of the orthodox literature on rigidity may be seen as appealing, more or less explicitly, to a semantic form of “the given” in Sellars’s terms. However, the important insights of that literature may be reconstructed and articulated in terms more congenial to the Pittsburgh school of normative functionalism.
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  3. Michael P. Wolf (2009). Could I Just Be a Very Epistemically Responsible Zombie? Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (2):69-72.
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  4. Michael P. Wolf (2008). “I'm Here Now”. Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (2):109-116.
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  5. Michael P. Wolf (2008). Language, Mind, and World: Can't We All Just Get Along? Metaphilosophy 39 (3):363–380.
    This article addresses recent claims made by Richard Rorty about antirepresentationalist theories of meaning. Rorty asserts that a faithful rendering of the core antirepresentationalist assumptions precludes even revised pieces of representationalist semantics like "refers" or "true" and epistemological correlates like "answering to the facts." Rorty even asserts that such notions invite reactionary authoritarian elements that would impede the development of a democratic humanism. I reject this claim and assert that such notions (suitably constructed) pose no greater threat to democratic humanism (...)
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  6. Michael P. Wolf (2007). Reference and Incommensurability: What Rigid Designation Won't Get You. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 22 (3):207-222.
    Causal theories of reference in the philosophy of language and philosophy of science have suggested that it could resolve lingering worries about incommensurability between theoretical claims in different paradigms, to borrow Kuhn’s terms. If we co-refer throughout different paradigms, then the problems of incommensurability are greatly diminished, according to causal theorists. I argue that assuring ourselves of that sort of constancy of reference will require comparable sorts of cross-paradigm affinities, and thus provides us with no special relief on this problem. (...)
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  7. Michael P. Wolf (2007). Sellars on the Revision of Theoretical Commitments. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 92 (1):233-255.
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  8. Mark Lance & Michael P. Wolf (eds.) (2006). The Self-Correcting Enterprise: Essays on Wilfrid Sellars. Rodopi.
    This volume presents ten new essays on the work of Wilfrid Sellars and its implications for contemporary philosophy.
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  9. Michael P. Wolf (ed.) (2006). The Self-Correcting Enterprise: Essays on Wilfrid Sellars. Rodopi Bv Editions.
    This volume is of interest to those studying cognitive development, perception, justification and semantics. It will also be of great interest to anyone following the recent work of John McDowell or Robert Brandom.
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  10. Michael P. Wolf, Philosophy of Language. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  11. Michael P. Wolf (2006). Rigid Designation and Anaphoric Theories of Reference. Philosophical Studies 130 (2):351 - 375.
    Few philosophers today doubt the importance of some notion of rigid designation, as suggested by Kripke and Putnam for names and natural kind terms. At the very least, most of us want our theories to be compatible with the most plausible elements of that account. Anaphoric theories of reference have gained some attention lately, but little attention has been given to how they square with rigid designation. Although the differences between anaphoric theories and many interpretations of the New Theory of (...)
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  12. Michael P. Wolf (ed.) (2006). The Self-Correcting Enterprise: Essays on Wilfrid Sellars (Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities, Volume 9. Rodopi.
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  13. Michael P. Wolf (2005). Contextualist Responses to Greene's Puzzle. Southwest Philosophy Review 21 (2):179-182.
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  14. Michael P. Wolf (2002). A Grasshopper Walks Into a Bar: The Role of Humour in Normativity. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 32 (3):330–343.
  15. Michael P. Wolf (2002). Kripke, Putnam and the Introduction of Natural Kind Terms. Acta Analytica 17 (1):151-170.
    In this paper, I will outline some of the important points made by Kripke and Putnam on the meaning of natural kind terms. Their notion of the baptism of natural kinds- the process by which kind terms are initially introduced into the language — is of special concern here. I argue that their accounts leave some ambiguities that suggest a baptism of objects and kinds that is free of additional theoretical commitments. Both authors suggest that we name the stuff and (...)
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  16. Michael P. Wolf (2002). The Curious Role of Natural Kind Terms. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 83 (1):81–101.
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