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Profile: Michael Rea (University of Notre Dame)
  1. Jeffrey Brower & Michael Rea, Understanding the Trinity.
    The doctrine of the Trinity poses a deep and difficult problem. On the one hand, it says that there are three distinct Persons—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—and that each of these Persons “is God”. On the other hand, it says that there is one and only one God. So it appears to involve a contradiction. It seems to say that there is exactly one divine being, and also that there is more than one. How are we to make sense of (...)
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  2. Louis P. Pojman & Michael Rea (eds.) (forthcoming). Philosophy of Religion: An Anthology, 7th Edition.
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  3. Michael Rea (2014). Metaphysics: The Basics. Routledge.
    Metaphysics: The Basics is a concise and engaging introduction to the philosophical study of the world and universe in which we live. Concerned with questions about reality, existence, time, identity and change, metaphysics has long fascinated people but to the uninitiated some of the issues and problems can appear very complex. In this lively and lucid book, Michael Rea examines and explains the core questions in the study of metaphysics such as: Do things actually exist? Is time travel possible? Are (...)
     
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  4. Michael Rea & Bertrand Russell (2013). Jeffrey, Richard 125, 130. In Chris Tucker (ed.), Seemings and Justification: New Essays on Dogmatism and Phenomenal Conservatism. Oup Usa. 351.
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  5. Kelly James Clark & Michael Rea (eds.) (2012). Reason, Metaphysics, and Mind: New Essays on the Philosophy of Alvin Plantinga. OUP USA.
    In May 2010, philosophers, family and friends gathered at the University of Notre Dame to celebrate the career and retirement of Alvin Plantinga, widely recognized as one of the world's leading figures in metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophy of religion. Plantinga has earned particular respect within the community of Christian philosophers for the pivotal role that he played in the recent renewal and development of philosophy of religion and philosophical theology. Each of the essays in this volume engages with some (...)
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  6. Alvin Plantinga, Kelly James Clark & Michael C. Rea (eds.) (2012). Reason, Metaphysics, and Mind: New Essays on the Philosophy of Alvin Plantinga. Oxford University Press.
    Each of the essays in this volume engages with some particular aspect of philosopher Alvin Plantinga's views on metaphysics, epistemology, or philosophy of religion.
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  7. Michael Rea (2011). Hylomorphism and the Incarnation. In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Oup Oxford.
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  8. Michael C. Rea (2011). Hylomorphism Reconditioned. Philosophical Perspectives 25 (1):341-358.
    My goal in this paper is to provide characterizations of matter, form and constituency in a way that avoids what I take to be the three main drawbacks of other hylomorphic theories: (i) commitment to the universal-particular distinction; (ii) commitment to a primitive or problematic notion of inherence or constituency; (iii) inability to identify viable candidates for matter and form in nature, or to characterize them in terms of primitives widely regarded to be intelligible.
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  9. Michael C. Rea (2010). Universalism and Extensionalism: A Reply to Varzi. Analysis 70 (3):490-496.
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  10. Oliver D. Crisp & Michael C. Rea (eds.) (2009). Analytic Theology: New Essays in the Philosophy of Theology. Oxford Up.
  11. Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.) (2009). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
    The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology attempts both to familiarize readers with the directions in which this scholarship has gone and to pursue the ...
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  12. Michael Rea (2009). Review of Paul K. Moser (Ed.), Jesus and Philosophy: New Essays. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).
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  13. Michael C. Rea (ed.) (2009). Arguing About Metaphysics. Routledge.
    Arguing about Metaphysics is a wide-ranging anthology that introduces students to one of the most fundamental areas of philosophy. It covers core topics in metaphysics such as personal identity, the nature of being, time, and the concept of freedom. The volume contains scholarly articles by Quine, Lewis, van Inwagen and Pereboom, as well short works of science fiction that illustrate key ideas in metaphysics. The volume is divided into five parts, helping the student get to grips with classic and core (...)
     
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  14. Michael C. Rea (ed.) (2009). Oxford Readings in Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
    v. 1. Trinity, incarnation, and atonement -- v. 2. Providence, scripture, and resurrection.
     
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  15. Michael C. Rea (ed.) (2009). Oxford Readings in Philosophical Theology: Volume 2: Providence, Scripture, and Resurrection. Oup.
  16. Michael C. Rea (ed.) (2009). Oxford Readings in Philosophical Theology: Volume 1: Trinity, Incarnation, and Atonement. Oup.
    A new two volume anthology bringing together the best recent writing in the interdisciplinary field of philosophical theology.
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  17. Michael C. Rea (2009). The Trinity. In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press. 403--429.
    This paper provides an overview of the Christian doctrine of the Trinity, with special attention to the most influential solutions to the so-called "threeness-oneness problem".
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  18. Michael Rea & Oliver Crisp (eds.) (2009). Analytic Theology: New Essays in the Philosophy of Theology. Oxford University Press.
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  19. Alicia Finch & Michael Rea (2008). Presentism and Ockham's Way Out. Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 1:1-17.
  20. Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (2008). Introduction. In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
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  21. Michael Rea (ed.) (2008). Metaphysics. Routledge.
    Metaphysics, at least roughly speaking, is the systematic investigation of fundamental presuppositions underlying commonsense and scientific views of the world. Most of us believe that we have bodies and minds, that we are free, that some things in the world are composed of other things and that these things interact causally with one another; we believe that, in addition to the "way things are", there are other ways things could have been, and so on. Common sense tells us that things (...)
     
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  22. Michael C. Rea (2008). Hyperspace and the Best World Problem: A Reply to Hud Hudson. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (2):444 - 451.
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  23. Michael C. Rea (ed.) (2008). Metaphysics: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge.
    v. 1. Foundations -- v. 2. Modality and modal structure I -- v. 3. Modality and modal structure II -- v. 4. The metaphysics of material objects : identity and individuation -- v. 5. the metaphysics of material objects II : composition and vagueness.
     
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  24. Michael Rea (2007). The Metaphysics of Original Sin. In Peter Van Inwagen & Dean Zimmerman (eds.), Persons: Human and Divine. Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press ;. 319--356.
    This paper argues that there is no straightforward conflict between the traditional Christian doctrine of original sin and the thesis that a person P is morally responsible for the obtaining of a state of affairs S only if S obtains (or obtained) and P could have prevented S from obtaining.
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  25. Michael Rea (2006). Polytheism and Christian Belief. Journal of Theological Studies 57:133-48.
    Christian philosophers and theologians have long been concerned with the question of how to reconcile their belief in three fully divine Persons with their commitment to monotheism.<span class='Hi'></span> The most popular strategy for doing this—the Social Trinitarian strategy—argues that,<span class='Hi'></span> though the divine Persons are in no sense the same God,<span class='Hi'></span> monotheism is secured by certain relations <span class='Hi'></span>(e.g.<span class='Hi'></span> familial relations,<span class='Hi'></span> dependence relations,<span class='Hi'></span> or compositional relations)<span class='Hi'></span> that obtain among them.<span class='Hi'></span> It is argued that if (...)
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  26. Michael C. Rea (2006). Presentism and Fatalism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (4):511 – 524.
    It is widely believed that presentism is compatible with both a libertarian view of human freedom and an unrestricted principle of bivalence. I argue that, in fact, presentists must choose between bivalence and libertarianism: if presentism is true, then either the future is open or no one is free in the way that libertarians understand freedom.
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  27. Michael Bergmann & Michael Rea (2005). In Defence of Sceptical Theism: A Reply to Almeida and Oppy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (2):241 – 251.
    Some evidential arguments from evil rely on an inference of the following sort: 'If, after thinking hard, we can't think of any God-justifying reason for permitting some horrific evil then it is likely that there is no such reason'. Sceptical theists, us included, say that this inference is not a good one and that evidential arguments from evil that depend on it are, as a result, unsound. Michael Almeida and Graham Oppy have argued (in a previous issue of this journal) (...)
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  28. Jeffrey E. Brower & Michael Rea (2005). Material Constitution and the Trinity. Faith and Philosophy 22 (1):57-76.
    As is well known, the Christian doctrine of the Trinity poses a serious philosophical problem. On the one hand, it affirms that there are three distinct Persons—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—each of whom is God. On the other hand, it says that there is one and only one God. The doctrine therefore pulls us in two directions at once—in the direction of saying that there is exactly one divine being and in the direction of saying that there is more than (...)
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  29. Michael Rea (2005). In Defence of Sceptical Theism: A Reply to Almeida and Oppy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (2):241-251.
    Some evidential arguments from evil rely on an inference of the following sort: ?If, after thinking hard, we can't think of any God-justifying reason for permitting some horrific evil then it is likely that there is no such reason?. Sceptical theists, us included, say that this inference is not a good one and that evidential arguments from evil that depend on it are, as a result, unsound. Michael Almeida and Graham Oppy have argued (in a previous issue of this journal) (...)
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  30. Michael Rea (2005). Material Constitution and the Trinity. Faith and Philosophy 22 (1):57-76.
    As is well known, the Christian doctrine of the Trinity poses a serious philosophical problem. On the one hand, it affirms that there are three distinct Persons—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—each of whom is God. On the other hand, it says that there is one and only one God. The doctrine therefore pulls us in two directions at once—in the direction of saying that there is exactly one divine being and in the direction of saying that there is more than (...)
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  31. Michael Rea (2005). Naturalism and Ontology: A Replyto Dale Jacquette. Faith and Philosophy 22 (3):343-357.
    In World Without Design: The Ontological Consequences of <span class='Hi'>Naturalism</span>, I argued that there is an important sense in which <span class='Hi'>naturalism</span>’s current status as methodological orthodoxy is without rational foundation, and I argued that naturalists must give up two views that many of them are inclined to hold dear—realism about material objects and materialism. In a review recently published in Faith and Philosophy, Dale Jacquette alleges (among other things) that my arguments in World Without Design are directed mainly against (...)
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  32. Michael Rea (2005). 10. Understanding the Trinity. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 8 (1).
    The doctrine of the Trinity poses a deep and difficult problem. On the one hand, it says that there are three distinct Persons—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—and that each of these Persons “is God”. On the other hand, it says that there is one and only one God. So it appears to involve a contradiction. It seems to say that there is exactly one divine being, and also that there is more than one. How are we to make sense of (...)
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  33. Michael C. Rea (2005). Naturalism and Ontology. Faith and Philosophy 22 (3):343-357.
    In World Without Design: The Ontological Consequences of Naturalism, I argued that there is an important sense in which naturalism’s current status asmethodological orthodoxy is without rational foundation, and I argued that naturalists must give up two views that many of them are inclined to hold dear—realism about material objects and materialism. In a review recently published in Faith and Philosophy, Dale Jacquette alleges (among other things) that my arguments in World Without Design are directed mainly against strawmen and that (...)
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  34. Jeffrey E. Brower & Michael Rea (2004). Understanding the Trinity. Logos 8:145-157.
    The doctrine of the Trinity poses a deep and difficult problem. On the one hand, it says that there are three distinct Persons—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—and that each of these Persons “is God”. On the other hand, it says that there is one and only one God. So it appears to involve a contradiction. It seems to say that there is exactly one divine being, and also that there is more than one. How are we to make sense of (...)
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  35. Michael Rea (2004). Replies to Critics. Philo 7 (2):163-175.
    In World Without Design: The Ontological Consequences of Naturalism, I argued that there is an important sense in which philosophilosophical naturalism’s current status as methodological orthodoxy is without rational foundation, and I argued that naturalists must give up two views that many of them are inclined to hold dear-realism about material objects and materialism. In the present article, I respond to objections raised by W. R. Carter, Austin Dacey, Paul Draper, and Andrew Melnyk in a symposium on World Without Design (...)
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  36. Michael Rea (2003). Four-Dimensionalism. In Michael J. Loux & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. 246-280.
    (Forthcoming in The Oxford Handbook for Metaphysics) Four dimensionalism, as it will be understood in this article, is a view about the ontological status of non-present objects. Presentists say that only present objects exist. There are no dinosaurs, though there were such things; there are no cities on Mars, though perhaps there will be such things.1 Four-dimensionalists, on the other hand, say that there are past or future objects (or both); and in saying this, they mean to put such things (...)
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  37. Michael Rea (2003). Relative Identity and the Doctrine of the Trinity. Philosophia Christi 5 (2):431 - 445.
    The doctrine of the Trinity maintains that there are exactly three divine Persons (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit) but only one God. The philosophical problem raised by this doctrine is well known. On the one hand, the doctrine seems clearly to imply that the divine Persons are numerically distinct. How else could they be ’three’ rather than one? On the other hand, it seems to imply that Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are identical. If each Person is divine, how else (...)
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  38. Michael C. Rea (2003). Four-Dimensionalism. In Michael J. Loux & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. 1-59.
    This article characterizes the varieties of four-dimensionalism and provides a critical overview of the main arguments in support of it.
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  39. Michael C. Rea (2002). Lynne Baker on Material Constitution. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (3):607–614.
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  40. Michael C. Rea (2002). Review: Lynne Baker on Material Constitution. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (3):607 - 614.
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  41. Michael C. Rea (2002). World Without Design: The Ontological Consequences of Naturalism. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophical naturalism, according to which philosophy is continuous with the natural sciences, has dominated the Western academy for well over a century, but Michael Rea claims that it is without rational foundation. Rea argues compellingly to the surprising conclusion that naturalists are committed to rejecting realism about material objects, materialism, and perhaps realism about other minds.
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  42. Michael Rea (2001). How to Be an Eleatic Monist. Noûs 35 (s15):129-151.
    There is a tradition according to which Parmenides of Elea endorsed the following set of counterintuitive doctrines: (a) There exists exactly one material thing. (b) What exists does not change. (g) Nothing is generated or destroyed. (d) What exists is undivided. For convenience, I will use the label ‘Eleatic monism’ to refer to the conjunction of a–d.
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  43. Michael C. Rea (2001). What is Pornography? Noûs 35 (1):118–145.
    The October 1996 issue of Life magazine included, among other things, a photograph of Marilyn Monroe naked.1 Most people will agree that had the same picture appeared in the pages of Hustler, it would have been pornographic. Furthermore, the picture was considered pornographic when it originally appeared in a calendar in the late 1940’s, and it was banned in two states. But is it pornography in the pages of Life? Should Life have warned its readers that the October 1996 issue (...)
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  44. Michael C. Rea (2000). Constitution and Kind Membership. Philosophical Studies 97 (2):169-193.
    A bronze statue is a lump of bronze – or so it might appear. But appearances are not always to be trusted, and this one is notoriously problematic. To see why, imagine a bronze statue (perhaps a statue of David) and ask yourself: Which lump of bronze is the statue? Presumably, it is the lump that makes up the statue (or, as we say, the lump that constitutes the statue). After all, why should the statue be any other lump of (...)
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  45. Michael C. Rea (2000). Theism and Epistemic Truth-Equivalences. Noûs 34 (2):291–301.
    This paper defends the conclusion that every epistemic truth equivalence entails "near theism"--the view that (i) there exists a necessarily existent rational community and (ii) necessarily, there exists an omnisicent community.
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  46. Michael C. Rea & David Silver (2000). Personal Identity and Psychological Continuity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (1):185-194.
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  47. Michael C. Rea (1999). McGrath on Universalism. Analysis 59 (263):200–203.
    Mereological Universalism is the thesis that, for any disjoint Xs, the Xs automatically compose something. In his book, Material Beings, Peter van Inwagen provides an argument against Universalism that relies on the following crucial premiss: (F) If Universalism is true, then the Xs cannot ever compose two objects, either simultaneously or successively.1 I have argued elsewhere (Rea 1998) that van Inwagen’s defence of (F) fails because it relies on the false assumption that Universalism is incompatible with the view that, for (...)
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  48. Michael C. Rea (1998). In Defense of Mereological Universalism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (2):347-360.
    This paper defends Mereological Universalism(the thesis that, for any set S of disjoint objects, there is an object that the members of S compose. Universalism is unpalatable to many philosophers because it entails that if there are such things as my left tennis shoe, W. V. Quine, and the Taj Mahal, then there is another object that those three things compose. This paper presents and criticizes Peter van Inwagen's argument against Universalism and then presents a new argument in favor of (...)
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  49. Michael C. Rea (1998). Sameness Without Identity: An Aristotelian Solution to the Problem of Material Constitution. Ratio 11 (3):316–328.
    In this paper, I present an Aristotelian solution to the problem of material constitution. The problem of material constitution arises whenever it appears that an object a and an object b share all of the same parts and yet are essentially related to their parts in different ways. (A familiar example: A lump of bronze constitutes a statue of Athena. The lump and the statue share all of the same parts, but it appears that the lump can, whereas the statue (...)
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  50. Michael C. Rea (1998). Temporal Parts Unmotivated. Philosophical Review 107 (2):225-260.
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