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Michael Root [25]Michael D. Root [4]Michael J. Root [1]
  1. Michael Root (2013). Resisting Reality: Social Construction and Social Critique. Analysis 73 (3):563-568.
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  2. Michael J. Root (2011). Martin Luther's Theology: A Contemporary Interpretation – By Oswald Bayer. Modern Theology 27 (1):200-202.
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  3. Michael Root (2010). Stratifying a Population by Race. Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (3):260-271.
  4. Michael Root (2009). Measurement Error in Racial and Ethnic Statistics. Biology and Philosophy 24 (3):375-385.
    In the United States, the racial and ethnic statistics published by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) assume that each member of the U.S. population has a race and ethnicity and that if a member is black or white with respect to his risk of one disease, he is the same race with respect to his risk of another. Such an assumption is mistaken. Race and ethnicity are taken by the NCHS to be an intrinsic property of members of (...)
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  5. Michael Root (2008). Ecumenism and Philosophy: Philosophical Questions for a Renewal of Dialogue – By Charles Morerod. Modern Theology 24 (3):505-508.
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  6. Michael Root (2005). The Number of Black Widows in the National Academy of Sciences. Philosophy of Science 72 (5):1197-1207.
    Studies in the social and biomedical sciences of racial differences in socioeconomic status or health within a population view the race of members as fixed and look for a difference in the frequency of a trait like average income or disease risk between racial subgroups. But, as I explain in this paper, there are good reasons to allow the race of members to vary with the trait whose variation within the population is to be described or explained. According to such (...)
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  7. Michael Root (2004). Aquinas, Merit, and Reformation Theology After the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification. Modern Theology 20 (1):5-22.
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  8. Michael Root (2003). The Use of Race in Medicine as a Proxy for Genetic Differences. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1173-1183.
    Race is a prominent category in medicine. Epidemiologists describe how rates of morbidity and mortality vary with race, and doctors consider the race of their patients when deciding whether to test them for sickle‐cell anemia or what drug to use to treat their hypertension. At the same time, critics of racial classification say that race is not real but only an illusion or that race is scientifically meaningless. In this paper, I explain how race is used in medicine as a (...)
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  9. Michael Root, The Use of Race as Proxy in Medicine for Genetic Differences.
    Race is a prominent category in medicine. Epidemiologists describe how rates of morbidity and mortality vary with race, and doctors consider the race of their patients when deciding whether to test them for sickle cell anemia or what drug to use to treat their hypertension. At the same time, critics of racial classification say that race is not real but only an illusion or that race is scientifically meaningless. In this paper, I explain how race is used in medicine as (...)
     
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  10. Michael Root (2001). Hume on the Virtues of Testimony. American Philosophical Quarterly 38 (1):19 - 35.
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  11. Michael Root (2001). The Problem of Race in Medicine. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (1):20-39.
    The biomedical sciences employ race as a descriptive and analytic category. They use race to describe differences in rates of morbidity and mortality and to explain variations in drug sensitivity and metabolism. But there are problems with the use of race in medicine. This article identifies a number of the problems and assesses some solutions. The first three sections consider how race is defined and whether the racial data used in biomedical research are reliable and valid. The next three sections (...)
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  12. Michael Root (2000). How We Divide the World. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):639.
    Real kinds or categories, according to conventional wisdom, enter into lawlike generalizations, while nominal kinds do not. Thus, gold but not jewelry is a real kind. However, by such a criterion, few if any kinds or systems of classification employed in the social science are real, for the social sciences offer, at best, only restricted generalizations. Thus, according to conventional wisdom, race and class are on a par with telephone area codes and postal zones; all are nominal rather than real. (...)
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  13. Michael Root (2000). Philosophy of the Social Sciences-Realism and Classification in the Social Sciences-Index of Authors. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).
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  14. Michael Root & Harold Kincaid (2000). Philosophy of the Social Sciences-Realism and Classification in the Social Sciences-Global Arguments and Local Realism About the Social Sciences. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).
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  15. Michael Root (1999). The Ethics of Culture. International Studies in Philosophy 31 (2):133-134.
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  16. Michael Root (1998). How to Teach a Wise Man. In Kenneth R. Westphal (ed.), Pragmatism, Reason & Norms: A Realistic Assessment. Fordham University Press. 10--89.
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  17. Michael D. Root (1996). Book Review:The Philosophy of Social Science: An Introduction. Martin Hollis. [REVIEW] Ethics 107 (1):157-.
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  18. Michael Root (1993). Philosophy of Social Science: The Methods, Ideals, and Politics of Social Inquiry. Blackwell.
     
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  19. Michael Root (1991). Advances in Microscopy. Bioscience 41 (4):211-214.
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  20. Michael Root (1990). Alister McGrath on Cross and Justification. The Thomist 54 (4):705-725.
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  21. Michael Root (1990). Biological Monitors of Pollution. Bioscience 40 (2):83-86.
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  22. Michael Root (1989). Miracles and the Uniformity of Nature. American Philosophical Quarterly 26 (4):333 - 342.
    IN SECTION X OF "AN INQUIRY CONCERNING HUMAN UNDERSTANDING", DAVID HUME RAISES TWO QUESTIONS ABOUT MIRACLES AND THEIR RELATION TO TESTIMONY. FIRST, HE ASKS WHETHER IT COULD EVER BE REASONABLE TO BELIEVE ON THE BASIS OF TESTIMONY THAT NATURE DOES NOT FIT THE IMAGE OF OUR SCIENCE, AND, SECOND, HE ASKS WHETHER IT COULD EVER BE REASONABLE TO BELIEVE ON THE BASIS OF TESTIMONY THAT NATURE IS NOT UNIFORM. HUME’S ANSWER TO THE FIRST QUESTION IS ’YES’ AND HIS ANSWER TO (...)
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  23. Michael Root (1988). Glow-in-the-Dark Biotechnology. Bioscience 38 (11):745-747.
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  24. Michael Root (1986). Davidson and Social Science. In Ernest LePore (ed.), Truth and Interpretation: Perspectives on the Philosophy of Donald Davidson. Cambridge: Blackwell. 272--304.
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  25. Michael Root (1986). The Narrative Structure of Soteriology. Modern Theology 2 (2):145-158.
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  26. Michael Root & John Wallace (1982). Meaning and Interpretation. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 23 (2):157-173.
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  27. Michael Root (1977). Quine's Thought Experiment. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 2 (1):225-239.
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  28. Michael D. Root (1977). Nelson Goodman and the Logical Articulation of Nominal Compounds. Linguistics and Philosophy 1 (2):259 - 271.
    Nelson Goodman claims to have given us a criterion for likeness of meaning that is more stringent than simple coextensiveness and yet that avoids the familiar extentionalist objections. The notion of a nominal compound plays a key role in his account. I show that Goodman's comments concerning this notion are inadequate, that his comments concerning expressions like unicorn-picture are subject to two serious objections: (1) they don't support his claims about likeness of meaning (i.e., the claims that his criterion (...)
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  29. Michael D. Root (1976). Speaker Intuitions. Philosophical Studies 29 (4):221 - 234.
    I compare the tasks that Noam Chomsky and W. V. Quine assign the grammarian and point out that in many cases where Chomsky sees a question of fact Quine sees only a question of convenience. I argue that these differences are attributable, at least in part, to a difference in view concerning the data. Chomsky relies mostly on a speaker's reports of his linguistic intuitions. Quine finds this source methodologically moot. I develop a series of arguments that draw on Quine's (...)
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  30. Michael D. Root (1974). Quine's Methodological Reflections. Metaphilosophy 5 (1):36–50.
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