Search results for 'Michael S. Jastremski' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  17
    Michael S. Jastremski (1984). Death and Dying: Reflections of an Intensivist. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 5 (2).
    The prolonged life support of individuals with no hope for recovery has been an unfortunate consequence of recent advances in medical technology. The use of intensive therapy in such patients is contrary to the physician's obligation to relieve suffering and also creates an enormous economic burden for society. Once the physician has determined that there is no hope for a meaningful recovery, it becomes ethically correct for him to withhold or withdraw intensive therapy from that patient provided that such an (...)
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  2. Nadeem J. Z. Hussain (2004). Review of Michael S. Green, NIETZSCHE AND THE TRANSCENDENTAL TRADITION. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 113 (2):275-278.
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  3.  36
    Arne Rasmusson (2009). Neuroethics as a Brain-Based Philosophy of Life: The Case of Michael S. Gazzaniga. Neuroethics 2 (1):3-11.
    Michael S. Gazzaniga, a pioneer and world leader in cognitive neuroscience, has made an initial attempt to develop neuroethics into a brain-based philosophy of life that he hopes will replace the irrational religious and political belief-systems that still partly govern modern societies. This article critically examines Gazzaniga’s proposal and shows that his actual moral arguments have little to do with neuroscience. Instead, they are based on unexamined political, cultural and moral conceptions, narratives and values. A more promising way of (...)
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  4.  11
    Martin Campbell-Kelly (2013). Remembering Michael S. Mahoney. Perspectives on Science 21 (3):379-383.
    Michael S. Mahoney, professor of the history of science at Princeton University, died in 2008. Born in 1939, Mahoney was already a seasoned historian of mathematics when he became one of the first senior historians to take an interest in the history of computing. He was by no means the first: for example, individuals such as I. B. Cohen at Harvard University and Derek de Solla Price at Yale University had been interested since the 1960s. Moreover, several institutions were (...)
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  5.  14
    Richard H. Wilson (2013). Gazzaniga, Michael S., Who's in Charge? Free Will and the Science of the Brain. World Futures 69 (2):102 - 118.
    A review, with reflections, of Michael S. Gazzaniga's (2011) book, Who's in Charge? Free Will and the Science of the Brain. Gazzaniga, a distinguished neuroscientist, wishes to connect contemporary understandings of the functioning of the human brain to the proper functioning of the American courtroom. What effect, if any, should these current understandings (and current technologies) have on legal conceptions of personal responsibility, guilt, and punishment? If, as many neuroscientists hold, the functioning of the brain wholly determines the functioning (...)
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  6.  1
    Maria Pantea (2010). Sandu Frunzã, Nicu Gavrilutã and Michael S. Jones (Eds.) The Challenges of Multiculturalism in Central and Eastern Europe. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (10):248-249.
    Sandu Frunzã, Nicu Gavrilutã and Michael S. Jones (Eds.) The Challenges of Multiculturalism in Central and Eastern Europe. Provopress, Cluj Napoca, 2005.
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  7.  15
    Carolyn Price (2015). Emotional Insight: The Epistemic Role of Emotional Experience, by Michael S. Brady. Mind 124 (496):1240-1244.
    A review of Michael Brady's book Emotional Insight.
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  8. Kimberly Kessler Ferzan & Stephen J. Morse (eds.) (2016). Legal, Moral, and Metaphysical Truths: The Philosophy of Michael S. Moore. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Perhaps more than any other scholar, Michael Moore has argued that there are deep and necessary connections between metaphysics, morality, and law. Moore has developed every contour of a theory of criminal law, from philosophy of action to a theory of causation. Indeed, not only is he the central figure in retributive punishment but his moral realist position places him at the center of many jurisprudential debates. Comprised of essays by leading scholars, this volume discusses and challenges the work (...)
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  9.  5
    Alex S. Ozar (2015). Michael Wyschogrod's Messianic Zionism. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (4):606-628.
    This essay presents an integrated account of Michael Wyschogrod's Zionism as a function of his broader theological anthropology, eschatology, and carnal interpretation of Israel's election. Against Leora Batnitzky, I show that Wyschogrod's Zionism, while definitively messianic, is decidedly not fanatical or fundamentalist. Against Meir Soloveichik, I show that Wyschogrod has maintained this non-fanatical messianism consistently throughout his career, and so his pacific political prescriptions are organically at one with his vigorous calls for Jewish sovereignty over the land.
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  10.  70
    Jussi Suikkanen (2015). Review of Michael Devitt's Putting Metaphysics First: Essays on Metaphysics and Epistemology. [REVIEW] Mind 124 (493):327-331.
    This is a review of Michael Devitt's collection of previously published articles entitled Putting Metaphysics First: Essays on Metaphysics and Epistemology. The review also suggests a new way of formulation the realism/anti-realism contrast on the basis of Devitt's work. This contrast is understood in terms explanatory priority: should we in a given domain begin our theorizing from metaphysics (realism) or semantics (anti-realism)?
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  11.  60
    Robert J. Richards (2004). Michael Ruse's Design for Living. Journal of the History of Biology 37 (1):25 - 38.
    The eminent historian and philosopher of biology, Michael Ruse, has written several books that explore the relationship of evolutionary theory to its larger scientific and cultural setting. Among the questions he has investigated are: Is evolution progressive? What is its epistemological status? Most recently, in "Darwin and Design: Does Evolution have a Purpose?," Ruse has provided a history of the concept of teleology in biological thinking, especially in evolutionary theorizing. In his book, he moves quickly from Plato and Aristotle (...)
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  12. Timothy J. Bayne (2005). Divided Brains and Unified Phenomenology: A Review Essay on Michael Tye's Consciousness and Persons. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 18 (4):495-512.
    In Consciousness and persons, Michael Tye (Tye, M. (2003). Consciousness and persons. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.) develops and defends a novel approach to the unity of consciousness. Rather than thinking of the unity of consciousness as involving phenomenal relations between distinct experiences, as standard accounts do, Tye argues that we should regard the unity of consciousness as involving relations between the contents of consciousness. Having developed an account of what it is for consciousness to be unified, Tye goes on (...)
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  13.  66
    Gabor Pallo (2011). Early Impact of Quantum Physics on Chemistry: George Hevesy's Work on Rare Earth Elements and Michael Polanyi's Absorption Theory. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 13 (1):51-61.
    After Heitler and London published their pioneering work on the application of quantum mechanics to chemistry in 1927, it became an almost unquestioned dogma that chemistry would soon disappear as a discipline of its own rights. Reductionism felt victorious in the hope of analytically describing the chemical bond and the structure of molecules. The old quantum theory has already produced a widely applied model for the structure of atoms and the explanation of the periodic system. This paper will show two (...)
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  14.  7
    John Kelsay (2007). Comparison and History in the Study of Religious Ethics: An Essay on Michael Cook's "Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought". [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):347 - 373.
    Qur'an 3:104 speaks of "commanding right and forbidding wrong" as a constitutive feature of the Muslim community. Michael Cook's careful and comprehensive study provides a wealth of information about the ways Muslims in various contexts have understood this notion. Cook also makes a number of comparative observations, and suggests that "commanding" appears to be a uniquely Muslim practice. Scholars of religious ethics should read Cook's study with great appreciation. They will also have a number of questions about his comparative (...)
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  15.  19
    Cato Wittusen (2012). Exalting Points of View A Discussion of Michael Fried's Interpretation of Wittgenstein's Contribution to Aesthetic Thought. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 23 (43).
    This paper discusses how Wittgenstein’s thinking informs recent conversations about art and aesthetic practice by examining his influence on the work of the noted modernist art critic, Michael Fried. Fried considers an excerpt from Wittgenstein’s Culture and Value, with a puzzling thought experiment, to help us see more clearly the Canadian artist Jeff Wall’s photographic vision and aesthetic. I consider Fried’s account of the photographic practice of Jeff Wall, especially his photograph Morning Cleaning, Mies van der Rohe Foundation (1999).
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  16.  4
    Italo Testa & Matteo Bianchin (eds.) (2015). "Life and Action in Ethics and Politics", Book Symposium on Michael Thompson's "Life and Action". Philosophy and Public Issues, Supplementary Volume (2015), Luiss University Press.
    Book Symposium on Michael Thompson's "Life and Action" -/- (downlodable here: http://fqp.luiss.it/category/numero/ns-supplementary-volume-2015-life-and-action) -/- Table of Contents: -/- Paolo Costa, "Where does our understanding of life come from? The riddle about recognizing living things" -/- Constantine Sandis, "He buttered the toast while baking a fresh loaf" -/- Matteo Bianchin, "Intentions and Intentionality" -/- Arto Laitinen, "Practices as ‘actual’ sources of goodness of actions" -/- Italo Testa, "Some consequences of Thompson’s Life and Action for social philosophy" -/- Ingrid Salvatore, "Thompson on (...)
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  17.  4
    Pierre-Luc Dostie Proulx (2016). The Ethics of Detachment in Santayana's Philosophy by Michael Brodrick. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (1):125-128.
    Michael Brodrick’s book, The Ethics of Detachment in Santayana’s Philosophy, constitutes a much-needed contribution to the field of American philosophy. Although it is common for contemporary authors to claim that their preferred philosopher has been misunderstood, few can do so with as much conviction as Broderick has done for George Santayana, “a great and unjustly neglected philosopher”.The overarching goal of Brodrick’s investigation is the presentation of a conceptual framework for an “ethics of detachment” fundamentally mediated by human finitude. Setting (...)
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  18.  13
    S. R. Jha (1997). A New Interpretation of Michael Polanyi's Theory of Tacit Knowing: Integrative Philosophy with 'Intellectual Passions'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 28 (4):611-631.
    According to my interpretation, based on the entirety of Michael Polanyi's epistemological works, his theory of tacit knowing is conceived of as three models tied together by the central feature of Intellectual Passions as integrator. The models are progressively refined forms of his first conception of tacit knowing: ‘we know more than we can tell’. The three models are: the Gestalt-Perception Model based on the gestalt notion of part-whole relations, the Action-Guiding Model incorporating the phenomenological-existential notion of intentional action, (...)
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  19. Michael Ryan (2009). Michael Ryan's Writings on Medical Ethics. Springer.
    Michael Ryan (d. 1840) remains one of the most mysterious figures in the history of medical ethics, despite the fact that he was the only British physician during the middle years of the 19th century to write about ethics in a systematic way. Michael Ryan’s Writings on Medical Ethics offers both an annotated reprint of his key ethical writings, and an extensive introductory essay that fills in many previously unknown details of Ryan’s life, analyzes the significance of his (...)
     
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  20. Peter Beilharz (1984). Reviews : Michael Lowy, The Politics of Combined and Uneven Development, (Verso, 1981) and Raya Dunayevska, Rosa Luxemburg, Women's Liberation and Marx's Philosophy of Revolution (Humanities, 1982). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 8 (1):151-153.
    Michael Lowy, The Politics of Combined and Uneven Development, and Raya Dunayevska, Rosa Luxemburg, Women's Liberation and Marx's Philosophy of Revolution.
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  21. Igor Primoratz (2002). Michael Walzer's Just War Theory: Some Issues of Responsibility. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (2):221-243.
    In his widely influential statement of just war theory, Michael Walzer exempts conscripted soldiers from all responsibility for taking part in war, whether just or unjust (the thesis of the moral equality of soldiers). He endows the overwhelming majority of civilians with almost absolute immunity from military attack on the ground that they aren't responsible for the war their country is waging, whether just or unjust. I argue that Walzer is much too lenient on both soldiers and civilians. Soldiers (...)
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  22. William A. Rottschaefer & David Martinsen (1990). Really Taking Darwin Seriously: An Alternative to Michael Ruse's Darwinian Metaethics. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 5 (2):149-173.
    Michael Ruse has proposed in his recent book Taking Darwin Seriously and elsewhere a new Darwinian ethics distinct from traditional evolutionary ethics, one that avoids the latter's inadequate accounts of the nature of morality and its failed attempts to provide a naturalistic justification of morality. Ruse argues for a sociobiologically based account of moral sentiments, and an evolutionary based casual explanation of their function, rejecting the possibility of ultimate ethical justification. We find that Ruse's proposal distorts, overextends and weakens (...)
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  23.  4
    Michael Kreuzer (2015). Michael’s Story or the Paradox of Normalcy. Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 5 (2):E7-E10.
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  24.  23
    Michael L. Raposa (2012). Michael S. Hogue: The Promise of Religious Naturalism. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 72 (1):59-62.
  25. S. Raval (2000). The Ironist's Cage: Memory, Trauma and the Construction of History. By Michael S. Roth. The European Legacy 5 (4):600-600.
     
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  26. Michael Robertson (2009). Book Review: The Ethical Brain By Michael S. Gazzaniga. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 1 (1):12.
     
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  27. John G. Slater (2005). 15. Philosophy at St Michael's College. In Minerva's Aviary: Philosophy at Toronto, 1843-2003. University of Toronto Press 531-580.
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  28.  56
    Struan Jacobs (2003). Two Sources of Michael Polanyi's Prototypal Notion of Incommensurability: Evans-Pritchard on Azande Witchcraft and St Augustine on Conversion. History of the Human Sciences 16 (2):57-76.
    Michael Polanyi argues in Personal Knowledge (1958) that conceptual frameworks involved in major scientific controversies are separated by a `logical gap'. Such frameworks, according to Polanyi (1958: 151), are logically disconnected: their protagonists think differently, use different languages and occupy different worlds. Relinquishing one framework and adopting another, Polanyi's scientist undergoes a `conversion' to a new `faith'. Polanyi, in other words, presaged Kuhn and Feyerabend's concept of incommensurability. To what influences was Polanyi subject as he developed his concept of (...)
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  29. Tim Bayne (2005). Divided Brains and Unified Phenomenology: A Review Essay on Michael Tye's Consciousness and Persons. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 18 (4):495-512.
    In Consciousness and persons, Michael Tye (Tye, M. (2003). Consciousness and persons. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.) develops and defends a novel approach to the unity of consciousness. Rather than thinking of the unity of consciousness as involving phenomenal relations between distinct experiences, as standard accounts do, Tye argues that we should regard the unity of consciousness as involving relations between the contents of consciousness. Having developed an account of what it is for consciousness to be unified, Tye goes on (...)
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  30.  23
    Jeff Stickney (2008). Training and Mastery of Techniques in Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy: A Response to Michael Luntley. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (5):678-694.
    Responding to Michael Luntley's article, 'Learning, Empowerment and Judgement', the author shows he cannot successfully make the following three moves: (1) dissolve the analytic distinction between learning by training and learning by reasoning, while advocating the latter; (2) diminish the role of training in Wittgenstein's philosophy, nor attribute to him a rationalist model of learning; and (3) turn to empirical research as a way of solving the philosophical problems he addresses through Wittgenstein. Drawing on José Medina's analysis of the (...)
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  31.  41
    John Cleave & Ian J. Thompson (1988). Chaos and Order: An Interview with Professor Michael Berry F.R.S. Cogito 2 (1):1-5.
    Michael Berry, Professor of Physics at Bristol University, discusses the philosophical ideas underlying his research to the theories of catastrophes and chaotic systems. He is one of England's leading scientists, and has been instrumental in the growth of interest in qualitative phenomena.
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  32. Stefania Ruzsits Jha (2002). Reconsidering Michael Polanyi's Philosophy. University of Pittsburgh Press.
    The chemist and philosopher Michael Polanyi was one of the first twentieth-century scientists to propose a program to resolve the internal conflict of the modern Enlightenment: scientific detachment and moral nihilism with humanist values. Stefania Jha’s intellectual biography places Polanyi in the context of his time and culture, analyzes his key philosophical ideas, and explicates the application—and at times misappropriation—of his work. Polanyi’s method was not laid out in his published works, and his vocabulary tends to make his writings (...)
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  33. David Schweickart, Nonsense on Stilts: Michael Albert's Parecon Loyola University Chicago January 16, 2006.
    What are we to make of the "Parecon" phenomenon? Michael Albert 's book made it to number thirteen on Amazon.com a few days after some on-line promotion.1 Eight of the twelve Amazon.com reviewers had given the book five stars. It has been, or is being, translated into Arabic, Bengali, Telagu, Croatian, Czech, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish.2 The book has been endorsed by Noam Chomsky, who says it "merits close attention, debate and action," (...)
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  34. Andrew Chignell & Colin McLear (2010). Three Skeptics and the Critique: Review of Michael Forster's Kant and Skepticism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 51 (4):228-244.
    A long critical notice of Michael Forster's recent book, "Kant and Skepticism." We argue that Forster's characterization of Kant's response to skepticism is both textually dubious and philosophically flawed. -/- .
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  35.  2
    Paul J. D'Ambrosio (2016). Approaches to Global Ethics: Michael Sandel's Justice and Li Zehou's Harmony. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):720-738.
    In recent years Michael Sandel’s communitarian criticism of John Rawls’s theory of justice has gained much attention in philosophical circles. Specifically, he takes issue with the conception of the self—implicit in Rawls’s “veil of ignorance”: an extraction of the individual from their social environment, which creates an “unencumbered self” that is then used to theorize about justice. Sandel believes that some social ties are so deeply embedded in the human experience that even hypothetical isolation of the individual is likely (...)
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  36.  28
    Aaron D. Cobb (2009). Michael Faraday's “Historical Sketch of Electro‐Magnetism” and the Theory‐Dependence of Experimentation. Philosophy of Science 76 (5):624-636.
    This article explores Michael Faraday’s “Historical Sketch of Electro‐Magnetism” as a fruitful source for understanding the epistemic significance of experimentation. In this work Faraday provides a catalog of the numerous experimental and theoretical developments in the early history of electromagnetism. He also describes methods that enable experimentalists to dissociate experimental results from the theoretical commitments generating their research. An analysis of the methods articulated in this sketch is instructive for confronting epistemological worries about the theory‐dependence of experimentation. †To contact (...)
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  37.  21
    Kevin Williams (2009). Vision and Elusiveness in Philosophy of Education: R. S. Peters on the Legacy of Michael Oakeshott. Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (1):223-240.
    Despite his elusiveness on important issues, there is much in Michael Oakeshott's educational vision that Richard Peters quite rightly wishes to endorse. The main aim of this essay is, however, to consider Peters' justifiable critique of three features of Oakeshott's work. These are (1) the rigidity of his distinction between vocational and university education, (2) the lack of clarity and accuracy in his philosophy of teaching and learning, especially the under-conceptualisation of the role of example in teaching, (3) the (...)
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  38. Andrew Melnyk (2004). Review of Michael Rea's, 'World Without Design: The Ontological Consequences of Naturalism'. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (451):575-581.
    Substantial review of Michael Rea's, World without design: the ontological consequences of naturalism. It is an improved version of my paper, "Rea On Naturalism" in Philo, 2004, revised in light of Rea's comments on the earlier paper. The discussion focuses on Rea’s case for three of his theses: that naturalism must be viewed as a ‘research programme’; that naturalism ‘cannot be adopted on the basis of evidence’, as he puts it; and that naturalists cannot be justified in accepting realism (...)
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  39.  2
    Struan Jacobs & Phil Mullins (2008). Faith, Tradition, and Dynamic Order: Michael Polanyi's Liberal Thought From 1941 to 1951. History of European Ideas 34 (1):120-131.
    In his writings between 1941 and 1951, Michael Polanyi developed a distinctive view of liberal social and political life. Planned organizations are a part of all modern societies, according to Polanyi, but in liberal modernity he highlighted dynamic social orders whose agents freely adjust their efforts in light of the initiatives and accomplishments of their peers. Liberal society itself is the most extensive of dynamic orders, with the market economy, and cultural orders of scientific research, Protestant religious inquiry, and (...)
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  40.  15
    Jeremy Fantl (2015). Human Knowledge/Human Knowers: Comments on Michael Williams' “What's so Special About Human Knowledge?”. Episteme 12 (2):269-273.
    In Michael Williams' “What's So Special About Human knowledge?” he argues that the kind of knowledge characteristic of adult humans is distinctive in that it involves epistemic responsibility. In particular, when an adult human has knowledge, they have a certain kind of epistemic authority, and that to attribute knowledge to them is to grant them a certain kind of authority over the subject matter. I argue that, while it is true that when we attribute knowledge to adult humans, we (...)
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  41.  27
    Roy Ben-Shai (2010). Of All Things: On Michael Marder's Reading of Derrida. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (150):185-192.
    The Event of the Thing by Michael Marder is probably one of the most comprehensive and integrative readings of Derrida's oeuvre to date. A virtue of the book is that, despite the comprehensiveness of its subject matter, it does not assume the removed posture of an introduction, an exposition, or an explication. Its relation to the Derridian text is much more internal and intimate, and it should be noted that it presupposes a rather thorough knowledge of Derrida's oeuvre as (...)
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  42.  1
    Lucinda Vandervort (forthcoming). Book Review---Michael Plaxton, Implied Consent and Sexual Assault: Intimate Relationships, Autonomy, and Voice. Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of Women and the Law.
    This is a review and critical commentary on Michael Plaxton's 2015 book, entitled Implied Consent and Sexual Assault, in which he proposes that the legal definition of sexual consent be amended to permit sexual partners to define the terms and conditions of sexual consent in accordance with private "normative commitments" between themselves. The proposed "reform" is intended to permit an individual to agree to be a party to sexual activity that would otherwise constitute sexual assault under Canadian law. For (...)
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  43.  12
    Eduardo Beira (2014). “Visual Presentation Of Social Matters” as a Foundational Text of Michael Polanyi’s Thought. Tradition and Discovery 41 (2):6-12.
    This essay introduces Michael Polanyi’s 1936 lecture, “Visual Presentation of Social Matters,” which is an important document sketching Polanyi’s analysis of the need for education in economics. It led eventually to the creation of Polanyi’s 1940 film, Unemployment and Money, and Polanyi’s career change from chemistry to economics and philosophy. The lecture outlines Polanyi’s program to develop visual symbols that can be used in film to promote an understanding of modern complex economics for ordinary citizens. It makes clear Polanyi’s (...)
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  44.  58
    Jack Reynolds & Richard Sebold (2010). Review of Michael Marder, The Event of the Thing: Derrida's Post-Deconstructive Realism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (2).
    In this review we consider Michael Marder's association of Derrida with realism.
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  45.  20
    Ansgar Allen (2011). Michael Young's the Rise of the Meritocracy: A Philosophical Critique. British Journal of Educational Studies 59 (4):367 - 382.
    This paper examines Michael Young's 1958 dystopia, The Rise of the Meritocracy. In this book, the word 'meritocracy' was coined and used in a pejorative sense. Today, however, meritocracy represents a positive ideal against which we measure the justice of our institutions. This paper argues that, when read in the twenty-first century, Young's dystopia does little to dislodge the implicit appeal of a meritocratic society. It examines the principles of education and administrative justice upon which meritocracy is based, suggesting (...)
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  46.  19
    Richard Gelwick (2005). Michael Polanyi's Daring Epistemology and the Hunger for Teleology. Zygon 40 (1):63-76.
    . The linking of Michael Polanyi's name with a center at Baylor University that espoused intelligent‐design theory calls for examination of Polanyi's teleology. This examination attempts to put Polanyi's epistemology in the perspective of his total philosophical work by looking at the clarification of teleology in philosophy of biology and in the framework of three major features of Polanyi's thought: open and truth‐oriented, purposive but open to truth, and transcendent yet intelligible. The conclusion is that Polanyi would not support (...)
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  47.  1
    Charles Thorpe (2009). Community and the Market in Michael Polanyi's Philosophy of Science. Modern Intellectual History 6 (1):59-89.
    The chemist and philosopher Michael Polanyi (1891–1976) is today recognized as one of the most important twentieth-century thinkers about scientific knowledge and scientific community. Yet Polanyi's philosophy of science exhibits an unresolved tension between science as a traditional community and science as an intellectual marketplace. Binding together these different models was important for his overall intellectual and political project, which was a defense of bourgeois liberal order. His philosophy of science and his economic thought were mutually supporting elements within (...)
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  48.  19
    Paul Lewis, Walter Gulick & Mark T. Mitchell (2007). A Brief Symposium on Mark Mitchell's Michael Polanyi. Tradition and Discovery 34 (2):30-38.
    Paul Lewis and Walter Gulick summarize and evaluate Mark Micthell’s new book, Michael Polanyi: The Art of Knowing, and Mitchell responds to their comments in this symposium article.
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  49.  35
    Richard Carrier (2007). Fatal Flaws in Michael Almeida's Alleged 'Defeat' of Rowe's New Evidential Argument From Evil. Philo 10 (1):85-90.
    In a previous issue of Philo, Michael Almeida claimed to have “defeated” William Rowe’s “New Evidential Argument from Evil” againstthe existence of a benevolent god. However, Almeida’s argument suffers from serious logical errors and even logical absurdities, leaving Rowe’s argument intact and quite unthreatened by anything Almeida argues.
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    Aafke M. I. Van Oppenraay (2003). The Reception of Aristotle's History of Animals in the Marginalia of Some Latin Manuscripts of Michael Scot's Arabic-Latin Translation. Early Science and Medicine 8 (4):387-403.
    A considerable number of the thirteenth and early fourteenth-century manuscripts of Michael Scot's Arabic-Latin translation of Aristotle's De animalibus display a system of guiding marginal glosses. These glosses are usually added by a later hand with respect to the hand that had written the text. The manuscripts were not only annotated for personal use, but also so as to allow for a better use in compiling commentaries, encyclopaedias and compendia. We can say that the marginalia form the main, if (...)
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