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  1. William G. Bowen, Matthew M. Chingos & Michael S. McPherson (2011). Crossing the Finish Line: Completing College at America's Public Universities. Princeton University Press.
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  2. Daniel M. Hausman & Michael S. McPherson (2009). Preference Satisfaction and Welfare Economics. Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):1-25.
    The tenuous claims of cost-benefit analysis to guide policy so as to promote welfare turn on measuring welfare by preference satisfaction and taking willingness-to-pay to indicate preferences. Yet it is obvious that people's preferences are not always self-interested and that false beliefs may lead people to prefer what is worse for them even when people are self-interested. So welfare is not preference satisfaction, and hence it appears that cost-benefit analysis and welfare economics in general rely on a mistaken theory of (...)
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  3. Daniel M. Hausman & Michael S. McPherson (1998). [Book Review] Economic Analysis and Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ethics 109 (1):198-200.
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  4. Daniel M. Hausman & Michael S. McPherson (1988). Standards. Economics and Philosophy 4 (01):1-.
  5. Daniel M. Hausman, Michael S. McPherson, James Luther Adams, Wilhelm Pauck, Roger-Lincoln Shinn, Julia Annas, Jonathan Barnes, Richard J. Bernstein, Paul Canick & Ronald Christenson (1986). Received by 1 November 1985. Teaching Philosophy 9 (1).
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  6. Joseph Jacoby, Alan Ritter & Michael S. McPherson (1983). Book Review. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 2 (1):119-136.
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  7. Michael S. McPherson (1982). Mill's Moral Theory and the Problem of Preference Change. Ethics 92 (2):252-273.
    A reconsideration of mill's theory of "higher pleasures," construed as a way of evaluating changes in preferences or character that result from changes in social environment. mill's account is criticized and partly reconstructed in light of modern preference theory, but viewed favorably as an illuminating attempt to address a fundamental problem in moral evaluation of social institutions. mill's advocacy of the higher pleasures is defended in particular against the charge that it is incompatible with his commitment to liberty.
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