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  1. Michael Scanlan (2011). The Evolution of Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (4):405 - 405.
    History and Philosophy of Logic, Volume 32, Issue 4, Page 405, November 2011.
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  2. J. Brent Crouch, Michael Scanlan, Scott L. Pratt, Robert W. Burch & Phillip Deen (2010). 1. Between Frege and Peirce: Josiah Royce's Structural Logicism Between Frege and Peirce: Josiah Royce's Structural Logicism (Pp. 155-177). [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (2).
     
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  3. Michael Scanlan (2010). Sheffer's Criticism of Royce's Theory of Order. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (2):178-201.
    Henry Sheffer’s 1908 Harvard Ph.D. thesis contains an interesting appendix on a central feature of the logical work of his thesis advisor, Josiah Royce. This is the claim in Royce’s 1905 article “The Relations of the Principles of Logic to the Foundations of Geometry” that an unsymmetric ordering relation can be defined on the single symmetric O-relation for which he gives postulates in that paper. Sheffer criticizes Royce’s specific definition from the point of view of the evolving twentieth century conception (...)
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  4. Michael Scanlan (2005). First Page Preview. History and Philosophy of Logic 26 (4).
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  5. Michael Scanlan (2003). American Postulate Theorists and Alfred Tarski. History and Philosophy of Logic 24 (4):307-325.
    This article outlines the work of a group of US mathematicians called the American Postulate Theorists and their influence on Tarski's work in the 1930s that was to be foundational for model theory. The American Postulate Theorists were influenced by the European foundational work of the period around 1900, such as that of Peano and Hilbert. In the period roughly from 1900???1940, they developed an indigenous American approach to foundational investigations. This made use of interpretations of precisely formulated axiomatic theories (...)
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  6. Michael Scanlan (2001). Informational Privacy and Moral Values. Ethics and Information Technology 3 (1):3-12.
    A case from 1996 in Oregon in which citizens' legally publicmotor vehicle information was disseminated on a World Wide Website is considered. The case evoked widespread moral outrageamong Oregonians and led to changes in the Oregon records laws.The application of either consequentialist ornon-consequentialist moral theories to this and otherinformational privacy cases is found to be inadequate.Adjudication of conflicting desires is offered as the appropriateanalytical model for moral disputes. The notion of adjudicationoffered here diverges from traditional moral theories in itsindeterminate nature.
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  7. Michael Scanlan (2000). The Known and Unknown H.M. Sheffer. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 36 (2):193 - 224.
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  8. Michael Scanlan & Stewart Shapiro (1999). The Work of John Corcoran: An Appreciation. History and Philosophy of Logic 20 (3-4):149-158.
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  9. Michael Scanlan (1995). Wittgenstein, Truth-Functions, and Generality. Journal of Philosophical Research 20:175-193.
    Although it is eommon to attribute to Wittgenstein in the Tractatus a treatment of general propositions as equivalent to eonjunctions and disjunctions of instance propositions, the evidence for this is not perfeetly clear. This article considers Wittgenstein’s comments in 5.521, which can be read as rejecting such a treatment. It argues that properly situating the Tractatus historically allows for a revised reading of 5.521 and other parts of the Tractatus relevant to Wittgenstein’s theory of generality. The result is that 5.521 (...)
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  10. Michael Scanlan (1991). Review: James Gasser, Essai sur la Nature et les Criteres de la Preuve. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (2):757-758.
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  11. Michael Scanlan (1991). Who Were the American Postulate Theorists? Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (3):981-1002.
    Articles by two American mathematicians, E. V. Huntington and Oswald Veblen, are discussed as examples of a movement in foundational research in the period 1900-1930 called American postulate theory. This movement also included E. H. Moore, R. L. Moore, C. H. Langford, H. M. Sheffer, C. J. Keyser, and others. The articles discussed exemplify American postulate theorists' standards for axiomatizations of mathematical theories, and their investigations of such axiomatizations with respect to metatheoretic properties such as independence, completeness, and consistency.
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  12. Michael Scanlan (1983). On Finding Compactness in Aristotle. History and Philosophy of Logic 4 (1&2):1-8.
    Jonathan Lear has suggested that Aristotle attempts to demonstrate a proof-theoretic analogue of a compactness theorem in Posterior analyticsI, chs. 19?22. Aristotle argues in these chapters that there cannot be in finite series of predications of terms. Lear's analysis of Aristotle's arguments are shown to be based on confusions about the nature of infinite orderings. Three distinct confusions are identified. In final remarks, it is suggested that a compactness claim is irrelevant to the issues which motivate Aristotle's arguments.
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  13. John Corcoran & Michael Scanlan (1982). Review: The Contemporary Relevance of Ancient Logical Theory. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 32 (126):76 - 86.
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