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Profile: Michael Selgelid (Monash University)
  1. Christian Enemark & Michael Selgelid, Introduction.
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  2. Michael Selgelid, The Value of Security: A Moderate Pluralist Perspective.
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  3. Nicholas G. Evans & Michael J. Selgelid (forthcoming). Biosecurity and Open-Source Biology: The Promise and Peril of Distributed Synthetic Biological Technologies. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-19.
    In this article, we raise ethical concerns about the potential misuse of open-source biology (OSB): biological research and development that progresses through an organisational model of radical openness, deskilling, and innovation. We compare this organisational structure to that of the open-source software model, and detail salient ethical implications of this model. We demonstrate that OSB, in virtue of its commitment to openness, may be resistant to governance attempts.
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  4. Michael J. Selgelid (forthcoming). Ethical and Empirical Issues Concerning Conditional Treatment of Lead Poisoning From Gold Mining in Nigeria. Public Health Ethics:phu015.
    Whether or not MSF should provide unconditional treatment for lead poisoning in Nigeria partly depends on answers to empirical questions regarding what the overall consequences of such a practice are likely to be. Conditional provision of treatment may yield greater health benefits (especially if treatment resources are limited).
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  5. Michael J. Selgelid (forthcoming). Moderate Eugenics and Human Enhancement. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-10.
    Though the reputation of eugenics has been tarnished by history, eugenics per se is not necessarily a bad thing. Many advocate a liberal new eugenics—where individuals are free to choose whether or not to employ genetic technologies for reproductive purposes. Though genetic interventions aimed at the prevention of severe genetic disorders may be morally and socially acceptable, reproductive liberty in the context of enhancement may conflict with equality. Enhancement could also have adverse effects on utility. The enhancement debate requires a (...)
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  6. Ben Bambery, Michael Selgelid, Hannah Maslen, Andrew J. Pollard & Julian Savulescu (2013). The Case for Mandatory Flu Vaccination of Children. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (9):38 - 40.
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  7. Michael J. Selgelid (2013). Dual‐Use Research. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  8. Michael J. Selgelid (2013). Moral Uncertainty and the Moral Status of Early Human Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):324-324.
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  9. Michael J. Selgelid & Justin Oakley (2013). Introduction. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):323-323.
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  10. Michael Selgelid (2012). A Moderate Approach to Enhancement. Philosophy Now 91:12-13.
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  11. Michael Selgelid & Christian Enemark (eds.) (2012). Ethical and Security Aspects of Infectious Disease Control: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Ashgate.
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  12. A. M. Viens & Michael Selgelid (eds.) (2012). Emergency Ethics. Ashgate.
    Emergencies are extreme events which threaten to cause massive disruption to society and negatively affect the physical and psychological well-being of its members. They raise important practical and theoretical questions about how we should treat each other in times of "crisis". The articles selected for this volume focus on the nature and significance of emergencies; ethical issues in emergency public policy and law; war, terrorism and supreme emergencies; and public health and humanitarian emergencies. Together they demonstrate the normative implications of (...)
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  13. Michael J. Selgelid (2011). Global Health Justice. In Michael Boylan (ed.), The Morality and Global Justice Reader. Westview Press. 211.
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  14. Michaelj Selgelid, Doris Schroeder & Thomas Pogge (2011). Part Three. In Michael Boylan (ed.), The Morality and Global Justice Reader. Westview Press. 205.
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  15. Michael J. Selgelid (2009). A Moderate Pluralist Approach to Public Health Policy and Ethics. Public Health Ethics 2 (2):195-205.
    Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics (CAPPE), The Australian National University, LPO Box 8260, ANU, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia. Email: michael.selgelid{at}anu.edu.au ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Home page: http://www.cappe.edu.au/staff/michael-selgelid.htm Abstract This article advocates the development of a moderate pluralist theory of political philosophy that recognizes that utility, liberty and equality (...)
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  16. Michael Selgelid (2009). Promoting Justice, Trust, Compliance, and Health: The Case for Compensation. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):22-24.
  17. Michael J. Selgelid (2009). Dual-Use Research Codes of Conduct: Lessons From the Life Sciences. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 3 (3):175-183.
    This paper considers multiple meanings of the expression ‘dual use’ and examines lessons to be learned from the life sciences when considering ethical and policy issues associated with the dual-use nature of nanotechnology (and converging technologies). After examining recent controversial dual-use experiments in the life sciences, it considers the potential roles and limitations of science codes of conduct for addressing concerns associated with dual-use science and technology. It concludes that, rather than being essentially associated with voluntary self-governance of the scientific (...)
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  18. Michael J. Selgelid, Angela R. McLean, Nimalan Arinaminpathy & Julian Savulescu (2009). Infectious Disease Ethics: Limiting Liberty in Contexts of Contagion. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (2):149-152.
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  19. Michael J. Selgelid (2008). A Full-Pull Program for the Provision of Pharmaceuticals: Practical Issues. Public Health Ethics 1 (2):134-145.
    Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics (CAPPE), Menzies Centre for Health Policy, The Australian National University, LPO Box 8260, ANU Canberra ACT 2601, Australia. Tel.: +61 (0)2 6125 4355; Mobile: +61 (0)431 124 286; Fax: +61 (0)2 6125 6579; Email: michael.selgelid{at}anu.edu.au ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Thomas Pogge has proposed a supplement to the standard patent regime whereby innovating companies would be rewarded in proportion to the extent to which their innovations lead to (...)
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  20. Michael J. Selgelid (2008). Ethics, Tuberculosis and Globalization. Public Health Ethics 1 (1):10-20.
    CAPPE LPO Box 8260 ANU Canberra ACT 2601 Australia Tel: +61 (0)2 6125 4355, Fax: +61 (0)2 6125 6579; Email: michael.selgelid{at}anu.edu.au ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract This article reviews ethically relevant history of tuberculosis and recent developments regarding extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB). It argues that tuberculosis is one of the most important neglected topics in bioethics. With an emphasis on XDR-TB, it examines a range of the more challenging ethical issues associated with tuberculosis: (...)
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  21. Michael J. Selgelid (2008). Improving Global Health: Counting Reasons Why. Developing World Bioethics 8 (2):115-125.
    This paper examines cumulative ethical and self-interested reasons why wealthy developed nations should be motivated to do more to improve health care in developing countries. Egalitarian and human rights reasons why wealthy nations should do more to improve global health are that doing so would (1) promote equality of opportunity, (2) improve the situation of the worst-off, (3) promote respect of the human right to have one's most basic needs met, and (4) reduce undeserved inequalities in well-being. Utilitarian reasons for (...)
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  22. Michael J. Selgelid (2008). Just Liability and Reciprocity Reasons for Treating Wounded Soldiers. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):19 – 21.
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  23. Michael J. Selgelid (2008). Michael L. Gross, Bioethics and Armed Conflict: Moral Dilemmas of Medicine and War. [REVIEW] Minerva 46 (3):381-384.
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  24. Michael J. Selgelid & Yen-Chang Chen (2008). Specifying the Duty to Treat. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):26 – 27.
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  25. Michael J. Selgelid & Christian Enemark (2008). Infectious Diseases, Security and Ethics: The Case of Hiv/Aids. Bioethics 22 (9):457-465.
    Securitization of infectious diseases may involve suspension of ordinary human rights and liberties. In the event of an epidemic, therefore, it is important to limit the occasions upon which draconian disease control measures are implemented in the name of security. The term 'security', moreover, should not be used too loosely if it is to retain force and meaning in political discourse. It may be argued that the bar for disease securitization should be set high so that it is limited to (...)
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  26. Seumas Miller & Michael J. Selgelid (2007). Ethical and Philosophical Consideration of the Dual-Use Dilemma in the Biological Sciences. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):523-580.
    The dual-use dilemma arises in the context of research in the biological and other sciences as a consequence of the fact that one and the same piece of scientific research sometimes has the potential to be used for bad as well as good purposes. It is an ethical dilemma since it is about promoting good in the context of the potential for also causing harm, e.g., the promotion of health in the context of providing the wherewithal for the killing of (...)
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  27. Michael J. Selgelid (2007). An Argument Against Arguments for Enhancement. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 1 (1).
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  28. Michael J. Selgelid (2007). A Tale of Two Studies: Ethics, Bioterrorism, and the Censorship of Science. Hastings Center Report 37 (3):35-43.
    : Some scientific research should not be published. The risks to national security and public health override the social benefits of disseminating scientific results openly. Unfortunately, scientists themselves are not in a position to know which studies to withhold from public view, as the National Research Council has proposed. Yet neither can government alone be trusted to balance the competing interests at stake.
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  29. Michael J. Selgelid (2007). Ethics and Drug Resistance. Bioethics 21 (4):218–229.
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  30. Michael J. Selgelid (2007). Pathologies of Power: Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor – by Paul Farmer. Developing World Bioethics 7 (2):114–116.
  31. Michael J. Selgelid (2007). The Dual-Use Dilemma-Reply. Hastings Center Report 37 (5):6-7.
     
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  32. Michael J. Selgelid (2006). Commentary: The Ethics of Dangerous Discovery. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (04):444-447.
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  33. Michael J. Selgelid (2005). Universal Norms and Conflicting Values. Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):267-273.
    While UNESCO's Universal Draft Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights highlights appropriate ethical values, its principles are stated in absolute terms and conflict with one another. The Draft Declaration fails to sufficiently address the possibility of conflict between principles, and it provides no real guidance on how to strike a balance between them in cases where conflict occurs. The document's inadequate treatment of conflicting values is revealed by examination of cases where principles aimed at the promotion of autonomy and liberty (...)
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  34. Michael J. Selgelid (2005). Democratic Defense Spending in an Age of Bioterrorism. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (4):49-50.
  35. Michael J. Selgelid (2005). Ethics and Infectious Disease. Bioethics 19 (3):272–289.
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  36. Michael J. Selgelid (2005). Focus on Infectious Disease. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (4):227-228.
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  37. Michael J. Selgelid (2005). Module Four: Standards of Care and Clinical Trials. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):55–72.
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  38. Michael J. Selgelid & Margaret P. Battin (2005). From the Guest Editors. Bioethics 19 (4):iii–vii.
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  39. Michael J. Selgelid (2004). ¿ El aborto para la prevención de las imperfecciones humanas? Aborto eugenésico, incertidumbres Morales Y consecuencias sociales. Daimon 31:115-130.
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  40. Michael J. Selgelid (2004). Ethics, Economics, and Aids in Africa. Developing World Bioethics 4 (1):96–105.
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  41. Michael J. Selgelid (2004). From the Guest Editors. Developing World Bioethics 4 (1):iii–vi.
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  42. Michael J. Selgelid (2003). Ethics and Eugenic Enhancement. Poiesis and Praxis 1 (4):239-261.
    Suppose we accept prenatal diagnosis and the selective abortion of fetuses that test positive for severe genetic disorders to be both morally and socially acceptable. Should we consider prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion (or other genetic interventions such as preimplantation diagnosis, genetic therapy, cloning, etc.) for nontherapeutic purposes to be acceptable as well? On the one hand, the social aims to promote liberty in general, and reproductive liberty in particular, provide reason for thinking that individuals should be free to make (...)
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  43. Michael J. Selgelid (2003). Smallpox Revisited? American Journal of Bioethics 3 (1):5 – 11.
    This article reviews the history of smallpox and ethical issues that arise with its threat as a biological weapon. Smallpox killed more people than any infectious disease in history-and perhaps three times more people in the 20th Century than were killed by all the wars of that period. Following a WHO-sponsored global vaccination campaign, smallpox was officially declared eradicated in 1980. It has since been revealed that the Soviet Union, until its fall in the early 1990s, manufactured tens of tons (...)
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