79 found
Order:
  1.  9
    Michael Tomasello (2008). Origins of Human Communication. MIT Press.
    In this original and provocative account of the evolutionary origins of human communication, Michael Tomasello connects the fundamentally cooperative structure of human communication (initially discovered by Paul Grice) to the especially ...
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   64 citations  
  2.  64
    Michael Tomasello, Malinda Carpenter, Josep Call, Tanya Behne & Henrike Moll (2005). Understanding and Sharing Intentions: The Origins of Cultural Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):675-691.
    We propose that the crucial difference between human cognition and that of other species is the ability to participate with others in collaborative activities with shared goals and intentions: shared intentionality. Participation in such activities requires not only especially powerful forms of intention reading and cultural learning, but also a unique motivation to share psychological states with others and unique forms of cognitive representation for doing so. The result of participating in these activities is species-unique forms of cultural cognition (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   153 citations  
  3.  48
    Amanda Seed & Michael Tomasello (2010). Primate Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):407-419.
    As the cognitive revolution was slow to come to the study of animal behavior, the vast majority of what we know about primate cognition has been discovered in the last 30 years. Building on the recognition that the physical and social worlds of humans and their living primate relatives pose many of the same evolutionary challenges, programs of research have established that the most basic cognitive skills and mental representations that humans use to navigate those worlds are already possessed by (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   63 citations  
  4.  24
    Josep Call & Michael Tomasello (2008). Does the Chimpanzee Have a Theory of Mind? 30 Years Later. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (5):187-192.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   62 citations  
  5.  12
    Michael Tomasello, Ann Cale Kruger & Hilary Horn Ratner (1993). Cultural Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):495.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   156 citations  
  6.  11
    David Buttelmann, Malinda Carpenter & Michael Tomasello (2009). Eighteen-Month-Old Infants Show False Belief Understanding in an Active Helping Paradigm. Cognition 112 (2):337-342.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   46 citations  
  7.  35
    Marco Fh Schmidt, Hannes Rakoczy & Michael Tomasello (2012). Young Children Enforce Social Norms Selectively Depending on the Violator's Group Affiliation. Cognition 124 (3):325-333.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  8.  12
    Michael Tomasello, Josep Call & Brian Hare (2003). Chimpanzees Understand Psychological States – the Question is Which Ones and to What Extent. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (4):153-156.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   48 citations  
  9. Michael Tomasello & Klaus Zuberbühler (2002). Primate Vocal and Gestural Communication. In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. MIT Press 293--29.
  10. Michael Tomasello & Hannes Rakoczy (2003). What Makes Human Cognition Unique? From Individual to Shared to Collective Intentionality. Mind and Language 18 (2):121-147.
  11.  59
    Richard Moore, Josep Call & Michael Tomasello (2015). Production and Comprehension of Gestures Between Orang-Utans (Pongo Pygmaeus) in a Referential Communication Game. PLoS ONE:pone.0129726.
    Orang-utans played a communication game in two studies testing their ability to produce and comprehend requestive pointing. While the ‘communicator’ could see but not obtain hidden food, the ‘donor’ could release the food to the communicator, but could not see its location for herself. They could coordinate successfully if the communicator pointed to the food, and if the donor comprehended his communicative goal and responded pro-socially. In Study 1, one orang-utan pointed regularly and accurately for peers. However, they responded only (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  2
    Federico Rossano, Hannes Rakoczy & Michael Tomasello (2011). Young Children’s Understanding of Violations of Property Rights. Cognition 121 (2):219-227.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  13.  22
    Juliane Kaminski, Josep Call & Michael Tomasello (2008). Chimpanzees Know What Others Know, but Not What They Believe. Cognition 109 (2):224-234.
  14. Michael Tomasello (2004). Syntax or Semantics? Response to Lidz Et Al. Cognition 93 (2):139-140.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  15.  3
    Michael Tomasello (2000). Do Young Children Have Adult Syntactic Competence? Cognition 74 (3):209-253.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   42 citations  
  16.  35
    Marco F. H. Schmidt, Hannes Rakoczy & Michael Tomasello (forthcoming). Young Children Understand and Defend the Entitlements of Others. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology.
    Human social life is structured by social norms creating both obligations and entitlements. Recent research has found that young children enforce simple obligations against norm violators by protesting. It is not known, however, whether they understand entitlements in the sense that they will actively object to a second party attempting to interfere in something that a third party is entitled to do — what we call counter-protest. In two studies, we found that 3-year-old children understand when a person is entitled (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  17.  5
    Felix Warneken & Michael Tomasello (2009). Varieties of Altruism in Children and Chimpanzees. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (9):397-402.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  18.  43
    Marco F. H. Schmidt, Hannes Rakoczy & Michael Tomasello (2011). Young Children Attribute Normativity to Novel Actions Without Pedagogy or Normative Language. Developmental Science 14 (3):530-539.
    Young children interpret some acts performed by adults as normatively governed, that is, as capable of being performed either rightly or wrongly. In previous experiments, children have made this interpretation when adults introduced them to novel acts with normative language (e.g. ‘this is the way it goes’), along with pedagogical cues signaling culturally important information, and with social-pragmatic marking that this action is a token of a familiar type. In the current experiment, we exposed children to novel actions (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  19.  5
    Brian Hare, Josep Call & Michael Tomasello (2006). Chimpanzees Deceive a Human Competitor by Hiding. Cognition 101 (3):495-514.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  20.  11
    Ulf Liszkowski, Malinda Carpenter & Michael Tomasello (2008). Twelve-Month-Olds Communicate Helpfully and Appropriately for Knowledgeable and Ignorant Partners. Cognition 108 (3):732-739.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  21.  9
    Carla Krachun, Josep Call & Michael Tomasello (2009). Can Chimpanzees Discriminate Appearance From Reality? Cognition 112 (3):435-450.
  22. Michael Tomasello & Josep Call (1997). Primate Cognition. Oxford University Press Usa.
    In this enlightening exploration of our nearest primate relatives, Michael Tomasello and Josep Call address the current state of our knowledge about the cognitive skills of non-human primates and integrate empirical findings from the beginning of the century to the present.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  23. Michael Tomasello & Josep Call (2006). Do Chimpanzees Know What Others See - or Only What They Are Looking At? In Susan L. Hurley & Matthew Nudds (eds.), Rational Animals? Oxford University Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  24.  1
    Michael Tomasello, Josep Call & Brian Hare (2003). Chimpanzees Versus Humans: It's Not That Simple. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (6):239-240.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  25.  53
    Michael Tomasello & Kirsten Abbot-Smith (2002). A Tale of Two Theories: Response to Fisher. Cognition 83 (2):207-214.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  26.  4
    Brian Hare & Michael Tomasello (2005). Human-Like Social Skills in Dogs? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (9):439-444.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  27.  6
    Michael Tomasello (2000). The Item-Based Nature of Children’s Early Syntactic Development. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (4):156-163.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  28.  4
    Thea Cameron‐Faulkner, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2003). A Construction Based Analysis of Child Directed Speech. Cognitive Science 27 (6):843-873.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  29.  21
    Marco F. H. Schmidt & Michael Tomasello (2012). Young Children Enforce Social Norms. Current Directions in Psychological Science 21 (4):232-236.
    Social norms have played a key role in the evolution of human cooperation, serving to stabilize prosocial and egalitarian behavior despite the self-serving motives of individuals. Young children’s behavior mostly conforms to social norms, as they follow adult behavioral directives and instructions. But it turns out that even preschool children also actively enforce social norms on others, often using generic normative language to do so. This behavior is not easily explained by individualistic motives; it is more likely a result of (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  30.  6
    Hannes Rakoczy & Michael Tomasello (2009). Done Wrong or Said Wrong? Young Children Understand the Normative Directions of Fit of Different Speech Acts. Cognition 113 (2):205-212.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  31.  42
    Michael Tomasello (2009). Universal Grammar is Dead. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):470-471.
    The idea of a biologically evolved, universal grammar with linguistic content is a myth, perpetuated by three spurious explanatory strategies of generative linguists. To make progress in understanding human linguistic competence, cognitive scientists must abandon the idea of an innate universal grammar and instead try to build theories that explain both linguistic universals and diversity and how they emerge.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  32.  39
    Miriam Dittmar, Kirsten Abbot‐Smith, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2014). Familiar Verbs Are Not Always Easier Than Novel Verbs: How German Pre‐School Children Comprehend Active and Passive Sentences. Cognitive Science 38 (1):128-151.
    Many studies show a developmental advantage for transitive sentences with familiar verbs over those with novel verbs. It might be that once familiar verbs become entrenched in particular constructions, they would be more difficult to understand (than would novel verbs) in non-prototypical constructions. We provide support for this hypothesis investigating German children using a forced-choice pointing paradigm with reversed agent-patient roles. We tested active transitive verbs in study 1. The 2-year olds were better with familiar than novel (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33. Richard Moore, Bettina Mueller, Juliane Kaminski & Michael Tomasello (2015). Two-Year-Olds but Not Domestic Dogs (Canis Familiaris) Understand Communicative Intentions Without Language, Gestures, or Gaze. Developmental Science 18 (2):232-242.
    Infants can see someone pointing to one of two buckets and infer that the toy they are seeking is hidden inside. Great apes do not succeed in this task, but, surprisingly, domestic dogs do. However, whether children and dogs understand these communicative acts in the same way is not yet known. To test this possibility, an experimenter did not point, look, or extend any part of her body towards either bucket, but instead lifted and shook one via a centrally pulled (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  1
    Josep Call & Michael Tomasello (1996). The Effect of Humans on the Cognitive Development of Apes. In A. Russon, Kim A. Bard & S. Parkers (eds.), Reaching Into Thought: The Minds of the Great Apes. Cambridge University Press 371--403.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  35.  3
    Susanne Grassmann, Marén Stracke & Michael Tomasello (2009). Two-Year-Olds Exclude Novel Objects as Potential Referents of Novel Words Based on Pragmatics. Cognition 112 (3):488-493.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  36.  24
    Richard Moore, Kristin Liebal & Michael Tomasello (2013). Three-Year-Olds Understand Communicative Intentions Without Language, Gestures, or Gaze. Interaction Studies 14 (1):62-80.
    The communicative interactions of very young children almost always involve language (based on conventions), gesture (based on bodily deixis or iconicity) and directed gaze. In this study, ninety-six children (3;0 years) were asked to determine the location of a hidden toy by understanding a communicative act that contained none of these familiar means. A light-and-sound mechanism placed behind the hiding place and illuminated by a centrally placed switch was used to indicate the location of the toy. After a communicative training (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37.  5
    Katja Liebal, Josep Call, Michael Tomasello & Simone Pika (2004). To Move or Not to Move: How Apes Adjust to the Attentional State of Others. Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 5 (2):199-219.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  38.  23
    Danielle Matthews, Jessica Butcher, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2012). Two- and Four-Year-Olds Learn to Adapt Referring Expressions to Context: Effects of Distracters and Feedback on Referential Communication. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (2):184-210.
    Children often refer to things ambiguously but learn not to from responding to clarification requests. We review and explore this learning process here. In Study 1, eighty-four 2- and 4-year-olds were tested for their ability to request stickers from either (a) a small array with one dissimilar distracter or (b) a large array containing similar distracters. When children made ambiguous requests, they received either general feedback or specific questions about which of two options they wanted. With training, children learned to (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  8
    Michael Tomasello (1998). Reference: Intending That Others Jointly Attend. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 6 (1-2):229-243.
    My approach to reference focuses on naturally occuring processes of communication, and in particular on children's earliest referential activities. I begin by describing three different kinds of child gesture — ritualizations, deictics, and symbolic gestures — and then proceed to examine young children's early word learning. The account focuses on the joint attentional situations in which young children learn their earliest gestures and linguistic symbols and on the social-cognitive and cultural learning processes involved in the different cases.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  40.  4
    Manuel Bohn, Josep Call & Michael Tomasello (2015). Communication About Absent Entities in Great Apes and Human Infants. Cognition 145:63-72.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  7
    Paul Ibbotson, Anna L. Theakston, Elena V. M. Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2012). Semantics of the Transitive Construction: Prototype Effects and Developmental Comparisons. Cognitive Science 36 (7):1268-1288.
    This paper investigates whether an abstract linguistic construction shows the kind of prototype effects characteristic of non-linguistic categories, in both adults and young children. Adapting the prototype-plus-distortion methodology of Franks and Bransford (1971), we found that whereas adults were lured toward false-positive recognition of sentences with prototypical transitive semantics, young children showed no such effect. We examined two main implications of the results. First, it adds a novel data point to a growing body of research in cognitive linguistics and construction (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42. Michael Tomasello (1993). Where's the Person? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):84.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  43.  15
    Barbara Stumper, Colin Bannard, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2011). “Frequent Frames” in German Child-Directed Speech: A Limited Cue to Grammatical Categories. Cognitive Science 35 (6):1190-1205.
    Mintz (2003) found that in English child-directed speech, frequently occurring frames formed by linking the preceding (A) and succeeding (B) word (A_x_B) could accurately predict the syntactic category of the intervening word (x). This has been successfully extended to French (Chemla, Mintz, Bernal, & Christophe, 2009). In this paper, we show that, as for Dutch (Erkelens, 2009), frequent frames in German do not enable such accurate lexical categorization. This can be explained by the characteristics of German including a less restricted (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  35
    Michael Tomasello (1998). Emulation Learning and Cultural Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):703-704.
    Byrne & Russon redefine the process of emulation learning as “goal emulation” and thereby distort its most distinctive characteristic: the criterion that the observer focuses on environmental rather than behavioral processes. The two empirical examples recounted – gorilla plant processing and orangutan manipulation of human artifacts – are hierarchically organized behaviors, but there is very little evidence that they involve imitative learning, program-level or otherwise.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  45.  5
    Michael Tomasello (2002). Some Facts About Primate (Including Human) Communication and Social Learning. In A. Cangelosi & D. Parisi (eds.), Simulating the Evolution of Language. Springer-Verlag 327--340.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  46.  2
    Michael Tomasello, Ann Gale Kruger & Hilary Horn Ratner (1993). Culture, Biology and Human Ontogeny. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):540.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  47.  3
    Michael Tomasello & Nameera Akhtar (2003). What Paradox? A Response to Naigles. Cognition 88 (3):317-323.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  48.  1
    Michael Tomasello (1991). Objects Are Analogous to Words, Not Phonemes or Grammatical Categories. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):575-576.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  49.  44
    Michael Tomasello (2001). Could We Please Lose the Mapping Metaphor, Please? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1119-1120.
    Although Bloom gives more credit to social cognition (mind reading) than do most other theorists of word learning, he does not go far enough. He still relies fundamentally on a learning process of association (or mapping), neglecting the joint attentional and cultural learning skills from which linguistic communication emerges at one year of age.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  20
    Josep Call & Michael Tomasello (2005). What Chimpanzees Know About Seeing, Revisited: An Explanation of the Third Kind. In Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press 45--64.
    Chimpanzees follow the gaze of conspecifics and humans — follow it past distractors and behind barriers, ‘check back’ with humans when gaze following does not yield interesting sights, use gestures appropriately depending on the visual access of their recipient, and select different pieces of food depending on whether their competitor has visual access to them. Taken together, these findings make a strong case for the hypothesis that chimpanzees have some understanding of what other individuals can and cannot see. However, chimpanzees (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 79